Corned Beef

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by bitterroot, Dec 28, 2012.

  1. Robert Engleheart Robert

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    Thanks, that looks delicious
  2. Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Care to share your corned beef brine recipe? I may just have to copy cat what you did, except I can't use rye bread because of this damn gluten allergy.
  3. bitterroot Love vintage graphite!

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  4. Patrick Gould Active Member

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    Ellensburg, WA
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    I usually just forgo the bread anyway :) (although the bread in bitteroot's pic looks terrific, and I expect is homemade)

    BTW: Follow bitterroot's linke to ruhlman's blog. While I was browsing it I noticed that there a several links to gluten free blogs.
  5. Robert Engleheart Robert

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    Patrick, after reading your post I've decided to try my hand at it. Do you cook (smoke) it to a certain internal temperature?
  6. Patrick Gould Active Member

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    Ellensburg, WA
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    About 170 should do it, but 165 is fine. You can do the entire thing in the smoker or wrap it in foil and transfer it to the oven to finish. I'm not sure what type of smoker you're using, but if it's charcoal you should expect to tend it more than in the summer. The wet cure brines the meat so it's pretty hard to dry out. The goal is to make the inter-muscular fat soft and springy. If you cook it beyond that point it might just fall apart. Don't worry, it'll still taste good. Slicing is important. Always slice it against the grain of the meat. If you slice it with the grain you'll get a tough, stringy mouthful.
  7. Robert Engleheart Robert

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    Lemoore, CA
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    Thanks, I'm using charcoal. Also using a tri-tip as I can't get brisket other than than sorry mess they sell in a bag @ St. Paddy's Day. Next cow my son-in-law has butchered I'll ask him to get some brisket (grass fed shorthorn or angus).
  8. Patrick Gould Active Member

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    That just might work. I wonder if you can get some California red oak like they use in Santa Maria? That's my favorite smoking wood.
  9. Robert Engleheart Robert

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    By the truckload ;)
  10. Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Robert, If you can have choice of the beef cuts ask for the plate. It was traditionally what pastrami was made from, but now it is very common to use brisket. The plate is generally not a very desired cut so you might more likely to get it, plus I actually like it better
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  11. Patrick Gould Active Member

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    That's a great idea Gary. Most of the cheap cuts are getting popular and more expensive, but I bet plate is still pretty cheap.
  12. Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Just know that you won't find it in the grocery store. You will likely need to go to a specialty butcher shop or to a ranch. I would think it would be a cheaper cut, although you may find less of it as the hanger steak and flank steak are becoming more popular.
  13. Patrick Gould Active Member

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    I know it has some relation to hanger, but flank also?
  14. Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Yeah, they are all from the same general section. You can still take off the flank and have an intact plate though. I'll be calling Bill (the Butcher) soon to see if I can get the plate for my first pastrami creation.
  15. bitterroot Love vintage graphite!

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    Boneless short ribs is another good option. That will be my next.
  16. Gary Knowels Active Member

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    BNLS short ribs are from the same section too! That is a damn tasty part of animal.
    I did some checking in Seattle and its tough to come by plate. I found 3 sources, however, the price is prohibitive at $8-10/lb. The Seattle butcher shops are very high end so that is to be expected. Outside of Seattle or with a ranch/butcher connection it may be an affordable way to go.
  17. Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

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    You guys are making me hungry. I'm hoping that if I stare at bitterroot's pic of his sandwich long enough, my hunger will go away.:confused:

    Nope...not yet...although I almost bit a chunk out of my iMac's screen.
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  18. Robert Engleheart Robert

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    Gary, thanks I'll check into that. What I've found is that here, plate or brisket has to be sourced from a custom cutter. Everyone is crazy about tri-tips and it's often on sale, so that's what I just put in the brine yesterday. My son-in-law and Grandsons are breeding and showing cattle in 4H. Mostly A.I. but we've just had the 1st baby from a natural insemination that turned out to be a bull calf, followed by two more AI's that were bulls, they just got turned into steers and will be going as market beef at the County fair this Sept.
    willy  tulare fair 2012.jpg
    This was last year's Market steer; 1250 lbs. and graded Prime.
    With 3 this year, we'll probably get one to eat and I'll see about getting Plate and/or Brisket.
  19. Robert Engleheart Robert

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    I just put 2 tri-tips in the brine yesterday, do you rinse them before smoking?
  20. bitterroot Love vintage graphite!

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    I made corned beef so no smoking was needed, but if I was gonna do pastrami I would rinse them thoroughly and pat dry before adding the seasoning and smoking.
    Patrick Gould likes this.