Cosmetic Alteration

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by Mike Etgen, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. Mike Etgen

    Mike Etgen Not Quite A Luddite, But Can See One From Here

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    New River Mike

    I've got a used, custom-built rod that I purchased from a fellow WFF member last summer. I've put it to use, like it a great deal, and definitely plan on keeping it.

    The "problem?"

    It has the name of the original owner on it, plus the usual information about the brand of the blank and the weight. This information is located on the blank just above where the grip meets the blank. It is underneath the epoxy.

    I'd like to get this strangers' name off my rod! Seriously, I'm asking if there might be a method whereby I can remove or mask that writing and then re-do it with my own name and the additional info.

    I should add that I've never built a rod so have no rod-building or finishing materials. One fellow member has suggested that I might be able to re-wrap that portion of the rod but the conversation hasn't gotten any further, and I know there's plenty of ideas out there.

    Any suggestions?

    :dunno
     
  2. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    Hey Mike,
    There are really only two choices, removal or cover up. Removal requires that you strip the epoxy that covers the inscription. Coverup would require a thread wrap and epoxy over that. Is there any thread under the inscription? It would make removing the epoxy easier...

    Are you asking for how to do this or for someone to do it for you?

    Roper,

    Good things come to those who wade...
     
  3. Mike Etgen

    Mike Etgen Not Quite A Luddite, But Can See One From Here

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    New River Mike

    I sent you a reply by email. I also scanned a five dollar bill and attached it as inducement to you to do this for me.

    (Just kidding about the five dollar bill. That would be counterfeiting, and John Ashcroft or one of his toadies may be monitoring this site for possible terrorist activity.)

    :rofl
     
  4. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    A feather or decal could cover it, too.

    Thread wraps are the most conservative of the approaches, but used to keep the blank in good condition.
     
  5. Mike Etgen

    Mike Etgen Not Quite A Luddite, But Can See One From Here

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    New River Mike

    I never thought about a decal, but that sounds intriguing.
    Once applied, would there be a way to "seal" it so it wouldn't peel away at some point in time?
    Or are the good ones so "bullet-proof" that it wouldn't be an issue?

    And, keeping in mind that you're talking to someone unfamiliar with rod manufacturing, I'm assuming that the thread wrapping would offer the least risk to the blank? And that you'd epoxy the wrap?

    Thanks for the ideas and any follow-up...

    :thumb
     
  6. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    One should epoxy the decal, and the wrap. And the epoxy should dry with the blank turning. And only a few of us have a rod drying motor, although Roper probably is the only one with a spiffy one.

    And yes, the thread is the best way to cover it while absolutely preserving the integrity of the blank. But right now, I am currently sanding an old fiberglass blank to remove the ancient epoxy (which is hard like a rock). The problem with graphite is the walls are extremely thin.

    And I bet Roper or I could do it for you for little or nothing, depending on the hassle you wanted us to put into it.

    Rob
     
  7. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    Hey TL, I was just thinking (I know, since when?) about how to remove the old epoxy. If there's a big build up, one could chuck the section in a lathe and turn the bulk off with a scraper. Hmmm, I think I'll try that on some of my old scrap test rods.

    Roper,

    Good things come to those who wade...
     
  8. Mike Etgen

    Mike Etgen Not Quite A Luddite, But Can See One From Here

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    New River Mike

    Meanwhile, I'll be shopping around for a suitable decal or label that we'll protect with the fresh new epoxy...
    Is that a plan or what?


    ;)

    PS..Please be sure to vote in the poll I set up in your "forgiveness" post!
     
  9. Flip

    Flip The dumb kid

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    greg has some pretty cool decals as well as a dozen or so rod turners, you can do it there free ( just decal cost) and that would look good.

    tom
     
  10. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    Man, I have been working on getting some epoxy off an old (70s?) Fenwick Boat Rod. I finally gave up, and clear coated it. It looks brand new, except for the color difference where the windings were, and those will be covered by my new windings.

    What I did was use 240 and 320 grit paper liberally to get the epoxy off, but man, was it a pain! I suspect that Fenwick was using something akin to Duro's 5 Ton Epoxy, and not LS Supreme.

    Stuff like LS Supreme seems to come off with a little heat and scraping. But if I were working on Mike's rod, I would be real careful about erring to the conservative.

    Rob
     
  11. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    That sounds really scary. I would chuck it up and use some 400-3200 grit emery cloth. I can just see the scraper, 'oops, there goes the rod!'.

    Better safe than sorry.

    Rob
     
  12. Mike Etgen

    Mike Etgen Not Quite A Luddite, But Can See One From Here

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    New River Mike

    Who's Greg, and where do I find him?

    :dunno

    Was gonna send an email but no profile info was available.
     
  13. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    Greg's Custom Rods in Lake Stevens, he also has a web site with and online catalog.

    Roper,

    Good things come to those who wade...