Crater Lake Area

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by elroostere, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. I'll be camping for a few days in the Crater Lake area with the in-laws in a couple of weeks and was wondering if there are any opportunities to wet a line around there this time of year? I know the Williamson and Upper Rogue are close but I know very little about them as I've never been to the area before. If anyone has any recommendations/suggestions, I'd sure appreciate it. Also, are there any fly shops in the area that I could contact?

    Thanks!

    Rob
     
  2. Man are you in luck.
    Go to Diamond lake, the outlet creek (Lake creek) I think.
    Hike and fish down stream.
    I haven't fished it in years, there were big RB's and Browns back in the day.
    There is a nice fly shop in Medford, I think you could do a inter net search Medford fly shop.
    Also the Holy water at the tail of Lost ck dam. Dry flies should be good this time of year.
    Lucky boy, good time of year to fish in southern Oregon. Summer run steel and salmon up to Lost ck dam.
     
  3. Hike into the Crater and fish the lake there are some larger rainbows in the lake and if you can get on the boat and ride over to Wizard Island, I would do it. They can leave you there to fish and the next boat can pick you up. I hve wanted to get back there, but have not had a chance. I caught a 20 inch bow there back in my gear days and lots of kokanee from the bank. There were everywhere swimming in schools. All of th little creeks that dump in the nearby drainages have small brokkies in them (I was told).
     
  4. don't do the williamson if you're looking to fish only for a few hours, you gotta be pro, or have a guide.....don't learn that river without help, like i did.....the learning curve is astronomical and you will have fly line wrapped in every tree from chiloquin to klamath lake.....go with a guide or leave it alone....most of the public fishing access offers little opportunity for fish.....

    i'd be willing to put money down that this is one of the most difficult western rivers to fish consistently/successfully...
     
  5. When I moved from KFalls a couple of years ago there were two quality shops in town.

    Parker's Rod and Gun Rack is a classic no-frills old school small town sporting goods store. Good selection of local flys tied by well known local tyers. Good source for hooking up with top guides if you want to try the the Williamson (heed the advice above about that river).

    The Ledge is a bit more upscale but also run by quality folks. A bit more targeted at a more affluent crowd looking for EXTREAM SPORTS experiences - rock climbing, kyaking, high tech gear, etc. Good selection of flys too, and some connections to guides I am sure. Very strong empahasis at this shop on customer service. They had access to some private water at one time that would make for a quality day if you are looking for that kind of thing.

    Can't go wrong with either shop in my experience.

    There is another shop in the area that underwhelmed me every time I went there. Their strongest inventory items seemed to be ego and unwarrented high self esteem.

    Diamond Lake was nuked this spring. Tuiy chubs had the ecosystem way, way out of whack. Second time since the fifties that they had to whack the lake. Somebody just could not help bringing some bait minnows with them and letting the spares go at the end of the day.

    Not sure if it has been replanted and is fishable. Might want to check before you make the long drive there.

    FWIW,

    DD

    (Glad this is an internet posting and not a spelling test!)
     
  6. Union Creek for browns and bows and maybe a few brooks. Get's hit hard by campers and RV'ers but that little creek has some beautiful small to large fish in it. There are some sections that are clearly spring fed but it's also a mountain/freestone stream- kind of like the Metolius.

    - Annie Creek is good too and right next to Crater Lake. It may be a little cloudy or turbid but don't let that bother you.

    I don't know how well Lake Creek out of Diamond is going to fish since the rotenone'd the lake. I heard that ever since the algae bloom of '01 or '02 and the subsequent die-off, Lake Creek hasn't been the same since. I've also learned there are some good-sized beaver ponds below Diamond Lake that hold some good-sized fish so...

    Rogue River Holy Water, or any of the Rogue River tribs or forks in the CL area would be worth fishing.

    Also, if you are hell-bent on hitting the Williamson- hit the Sprague River which flows into it. A bit easier to fish and quite a bit easier to access. One of the most beautiful rivers I've ever been on IMHO.
     
  7. If you head out the south entrance/exit of the park you'll soon come to Fort Klamath, a small ranching town, the Wood River flows through that area before joining upper Agency Lake. There are many access points on the Wood, but you'll simply need to scout them out from forest srevice roads. The wood has RB's but is most noted for it's big Browns ( first fish I ever caught in Oregon was a large brown from the Wood) You will also see many irrigation ditches which are fed primiarly by atesian springs, if you can locate access at bridge crossings, or get permission from the property owner, these ditches also have quite a few nice RB's however the water is crystal clear! but grass hopper imitations would be a very good choice in the wood or those ditches right now.

    If you go out the north entrance/exit to the park then head back south towards Klamath Falls, you will soon come to a roadside attraction known as the Loggers Museum. There is good access to Spring Creek here, but plenty of tourists may hinder your efforts :beathead: the creek flows under hwy 97 and then into the Sprague River, roll casts will be best used in this spot, but the creek is narrow and I have caught some good RB's in there, try nymphs and dry's. Directly across the hwy from the museum is a park where you can gain access to the upper Sprague, which is wider and should offer some quality dry fly action if you can wade it.

    I lived in Klamath Falls for 16 years and made many memorable forays into these waters. Because of the size of these streams and creeks, waders are not necessarly needed, BUT, if you do need to wade they would help, because these waters are cold!

    Good fishing, be sure to give us a report when you get back.

    LB
     
  8. Hey, I really appreciate all of the tips and suggestions. I'll check things out and post a report when I return. Thanks again,

    -Rob
     

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