cutthroat boats

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by hendersonbaylocal, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. Mark Moore Just a Member

    Posts: 734
    Vancouver, Wa.
    Ratings: +66 / 0
    Definitely appropriate work for a person of youth and vigor...great motivation for a college education.:ray1:
  2. Bob Triggs Your Preferred Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide

    Posts: 3,979
    Olympic Peninsula
    Ratings: +647 / 0
    "Adjustability" may be as simple as installing several oarlock holes for a range of options. Seen it done many times. Once you find an average optimum location you can also drill out holes fore and aft of that location as needed. It could give you an option for standing rowing, kneeling rowing, or turning around to row seated on the thwarts in the other direction. many old time rowboat men would have a plank handy to place across the rails athwartship and then they could slide that anywhere along the length of the boat to row from where they wanted to. A very handy feature when you have aload aboard, people or cargo etc.

    I would suggest a great book on all of this: "Boats, Oars and Rowing" by the late Captain Pete Culler. It is excellent. Also see the new compilation of his work called "Pete Culler on Boats"
    Captn Pete was a traditionalist, but if you pay attention you will see how this was all based on simplicity and functionaltiy. The old ways really do work.
  3. Zissou Intern New Member

    Posts: 45
    Fidalgo Island
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Ryan, what a great project you have undertaken. You'll be earning a many kharma points for the upgrades and refit of this craft.

    Milt, your boat is a beauty!

    Bob, I think I still owe you lunch and you owe me a casting lesson.

    -Keith
  4. Bob Triggs Your Preferred Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide

    Posts: 3,979
    Olympic Peninsula
    Ratings: +647 / 0
    Where the hell have you been???!!!!
  5. Tod Fossetta Sorry, I'm not set up for that.

    BEAUTIFUL! There's nothing like classic lines and good wood to bring a certain feel to your piscatorial pursuits.
  6. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    In the midst of stripping the hull. The bottom planks are actually in pretty good shape.
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  7. Milt Roe Member

    Posts: 396
    Taco Ma
    Ratings: +14 / 0
    Cool how they lay up the grain opposite like that on the bottom planks. Must make the wood swell together better. I wonder why the cross-planked bottom came to be so common - Must have been more work that way, but if so there must have been a good reason to do it that way.

    I have my eye on a fixer skiff. We'll see if I can get it from the curent owner - Strips bent around steamed oak, but she sits at high tide getting farther and farther from being fixable each day.

    Looking good - Keep the pics coming.
  8. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
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    Sounds like an interesting boat. It's strip planked?

    I heard that they lay the planks like that so if they cup at all, it's towards the chine, not away from it. On some good advice, I decided I'm gonna pull off all the planks and route a caulking seam onto the edges to I can caulk her with cotton and it should be dry (in theory) without having to let her swell up. We will see.
  9. dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

    Posts: 4,097
    Near the Fjord
    Ratings: +563 / 0
    Milt and HendersonBayLocal:

    I was wondering what size of motor you might intend to put on your boats? My second question, is how do you determine whether to use a long-shaft or short shaft motor? Do the cut-outs on the transom determine that you put a short-shaft on it...so to speak? Anyones help is appreciated.
  10. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
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    Larry,

    I don't think Milt has an outboard. Oar power only!

    I have an old 9.9 Nissan that came with the boat. I'll probably stick with that for now. It's a standard shaft. I'm no expert, but I think you basically just want the cavitation plate near level with the bottom of the boat.
  11. Milt Roe Member

    Posts: 396
    Taco Ma
    Ratings: +14 / 0
    My hull wouldn't plane well with a motor - too much rocker along the keel line so that it rows efficiently. So a small outboard for trolling would be all that I would use. I was thinking of putting an electric motor on there for trolling, but so far I like rowing the boat so much i haven't tried it. A 5 hp motor would be overkill for my boat.

    Generally, an outboard on planing hull should have the cavitation plate right on the surface of the water when running at speed. But that's getting down to the nitty gritty of maximizing efficency. Short-shaft motors would get you pretty close on a small skiff. Also could consider proper propeller pitch if you really want to get it dialed in. But I doubt you are looking to maximize high-end speed so any old motor would probably function just fine. We I was a kid, we used to run 12 ft aluminum skiffs with a 6 hp Johnson all day long. With more than 2 people and gear, we sometimes had trouble getting up on a plane. A 10 hp on that kind of boat would handle any reasonable load.
  12. Milt Roe Member

    Posts: 396
    Taco Ma
    Ratings: +14 / 0
    HBL - If you are going to take those planks off, you might think about caulking with 5200 when they are good and dry. I'm pretty sure cotton will leak until ther planks swell. If you want a dry boat and you are keeping it on the trailer, it probably won't stay wet enough to keep tight. I had good luck sealing everything with epoxy first, then caulking with 5200. Doesn't leak a drop. Lots of different ways to tackle the problem, (and plenty of people to tell you what the right way to do it is) so consider the options, decide what you think will work best for your situation, and go for it.
  13. Milt Roe Member

    Posts: 396
    Taco Ma
    Ratings: +14 / 0
    HBL - More unsolicited advise, but... Another idea that might be perfect for you - Rout a groove in between the planks and insert a flat 3/16 thick x 1/2 wide wood spline in between the middle of the butting edge of the planks. This helps seal up the bottom and allows for shrinkage and swelling to occur without allowing (much) water to travel through the plank seams. Water has to run into around the spline and throiugh the grooves to get into the boat. When wet, the seam is tight, when dry it reduces leakage. You will see this on-line sometimes as a solution to reducing leakage and also for firming up the hull with a boat is stored out of the water most of the time.

    OK - I'll keep quiet now.
  14. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
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    Thanks Milt. I found out yesterday that all the planks are glued to the chines and keel with 5200 or something similar. They are not coming off any time soon.

    Oh well, I think I'll just leave it as it was.
  15. Milt Roe Member

    Posts: 396
    Taco Ma
    Ratings: +14 / 0
    Well, I guess that makes the decision simple. You could always go back later and deal with the bottom planks from the exterior of the hull if you have a problem. Was it leaking much before?

    Chum fry will start showing up in a month - better get to work!
  16. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
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    First coat of primer on...

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  17. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
  18. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,399
    Kitsap Peninsula
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    That's nice!
  19. Mark Moore Just a Member

    Posts: 734
    Vancouver, Wa.
    Ratings: +66 / 0
  20. Greg Armstrong Active Member

    Posts: 1,024
    Pugetropolis
    Ratings: +342 / 0
    Great looking skiff! You brought her back to life, good job!