Diy mow tips recs?

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Evan Virnoche, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. what would be your reccomendation as a baseline double taper line for making mow tips? i have the echo tr 8 13'6 paired with a skagit max 575. Looking to tinker around with a do it myself gig to learn how to weld lines and what not. i will be running t-14, and eventually make t8 tips further down the road for my other rod application

    Do you want to go heavy on the tip section or lighter?

    9 wt floater?
    10 wt floater?
    11wt floater?
    12 wt floater?
     
  2. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

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    12 wt for T-14. That's what Ed Ward made his out of.

    Sg
     
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  3. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    The trick to making tips is to keep the overall length and grain weight of all of yout tips the same. This is accomplished by varying the length and weight of both the floating portion and sinking portion of the tip. There is no set weight for either. You change each component of the tip to attain the desired grain weight and length for the tip's intended purpose.
     
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  4. g_smolt

    g_smolt Recreational User

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    The belly section of a 12wt singlehand floater will usually be between 14-16gr/ft, depending upon manufacturer / taper. Get a grain scale and start hackin'.
     
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  5. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    In the Old Testament era of modern spey casting, before MOW tips and T-designated lines, some of us were already hackin' 'n splicin'. There weren't any mathmatical formulas. If a tip would turn over the leader and fly, it was a success. They weren't all Ultra Super Double Fast sinkers; light and medium sink tips have their place, too. I figured that a sink tip consisting of sections of progressively denser materials would sink in something close to a straight line from the floating belly to the leader.

    Checking my heavy duty tip wallet (mostly used on 9-12 spey lines), here are a few examples:

    15 foot, 129 grains: 5' butt from the belly of a DT10S Cortland 333 Type 2,
    10' tapered tip of ST9S Orvis extra dense.

    15 foot, 128.5 grains: 4' butt from same DT10S 333 Type 2,
    3 1/2' of belly from Cortland DT9S 333 Type 3,
    7 1/2' of ST9S Scientific Anglers Type 4 (formerly known as Hi Speed Hi-D).
     
  6. Wayne Kohan

    Wayne Kohan fish-ician

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  7. Hey wayne that link actually got me interested in it
     
  8. Jason Chadick

    Jason Chadick A Fish, A Fish, A Fishy, Oh...

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    If you're interested in saving a little bit of scrilla, you can get skagit cheaters in the clearance bin at most shops/websites because not a lot of people use them anymore. The really heavy cheaters weigh around 14-16grains per foot, and in a pack will have a number of lengths. A couple of years ago I found a set for $4, and made a variety of t-14 tips with them using hollow braid, nail-knots, and aquaseal (ala Skagit Master 1) for a total cost of about $35. Might be cheaper than buying a whole fly line just to chop up.
     

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