Drift boat bottom needs help

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by HWKSCRK, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. I have a hyde boat that has some good nicks in the chines. I know that hyde does what they call a tune-up on the bottom, I am not sure what that all entails, but I also am not excited about hauling the boat for 10 hours for repair. Would like to find a shop in the seattle area that could handle this. I called a local fiberglass repair shop but did not get a good feeling. If anyone has any experience, or suggestions that would be much appreciated.
     
  2. they will come and pick it up you need to go and bring it back for me I feel better having the manufacturer do the tune up, the materials will be the same as original. besides think of the places you can fish on the way back might as well huh since your there . thats my 2cents
    john
     
  3. I think now Hyde on the website has that listed on what they do. Chine work, trailer work, general clean up. This is pretty much what they do when a boat comes in from trade and put back on the market. It isn't cheap, 500.00 or so. This is the exact reason I went with the G4 coating. Matt Hyde tried to get me to have it done on purchase, but I passed. 6 months later I had it go back to have it done. The stuff is really amazing. I have whacked rocks hard, and when back on the trailer, you couldn't tell where it even was touched.

    No matter what you decide, call Hyde and see what they offer and such. And if you can afford the G4, get it. You won't look back...

    Greg
     
  4. Hawks Creek,

    That's what you get for taking your boat down the Yakima at less than 900cfs.

    I suppose I should pay for half the repairs!
     
  5. Call Hyde, ask for Rich, see when they have a truck in the NW, meet the truck, load the boat, pay the bill, get the boat back, easy as that! You won't regret the work.

    SAK
    Hyde Pro Staff
    www.XstreamAnglers.Com
    www.HydeOutdoors.Com
     
  6. Why not just do it yourself? You're going to whack the thing up again anyway. Get a can of gel coat, read up on using it on the net, and do the work youself on a weekend for about $20 between the gel coat and sandpaper. The only work is the sanding and polishing and I guess you can polish under power if you really want. If you decide to buy a buffer to save the elbow grease you're still way ahead of the $500 and you get to keep the tools. Otherwise, besides the gel coat, all you need is a sanding block, sandpaper, rubbing compound and a lambswool poishing pad.

    Here are a couple links showing how simple the repairs are to do:

    http://www.fiberglass-repair.com/rshop3.html

    http://atlantickayaktours.com/Pages/ExpertCenter/Repairs/Gel-Repair/Gel-Coat-Repair-1.shtml

    And that is for a "perfect" repair. My standards aren't that high! I just get it filled back with gel-coat and looking halfway decent. Who cares if the final job isn't "perfect" when you're done it's just the bottom of a drift boat. I can't see spending $500-$700 for a repair that does very little to affect performance that you're just going to have to do again in a couple years.. Worst case scenario you screw it up and you have Hyde do it for you. I don't think that will happen but it shows you have nothing to lose.

    Just my $0.02.
     
  7. Thanks everyone for the sugestions. I am not to worried about the bottom as much as the chines. Will contact hyde and get a little more info, and yes since you offered to pay itchy I will take it in cold Coronas next trip.:beer2:
     
  8. Anyone think of using kevlar for your glass fiber? Could that be what G4 is all about?
     
  9. Give the guys down at Fiberlay a call, They have all the epoxy, fiberglass, gel coats, fabrics and additives you will need, and they are local.

    If you don't want to do it yourself I'm sure they could recomend a couple of local shops.

    fiberlay.com
     
  10. Bottom..chines..whatever it ain't rocket science to repair it if the repair is to the fiberglass the process is the same and it won't affect performance at all if the repair isn't 100% factory, not to mention you're just gonna bang up your boat again next year. If you've got $500 + transport costs burning a hole in your pocket and 2-4 weeks of time for your boat to be away, go for it, you won't be disappointed with the work they do. All I'm saying is you can do it for yourself in a weekend and save a ton of time and money. Look at it this way...if you do it yourself instead of paying $500-$700 every 2 years for repairs, in twelve years you will save yourself at least $3,000. To me, that's a lot of money, enough to pay for a hell of a lot of fishing trips.

    Good luck whichever way you decide to go.
     

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