East fork lewis

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by james h., Jun 2, 2014.

  1. james h.

    james h. New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    1
    How's the steelhead on the east fork of the lewis? I've heard it's pretty slow does any one know when it starts to pick up? Mabey it had Idk but any info would be good thanks.
     
  2. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Messages:
    7,888
    Media:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1,974
    Location:
    Your City ,State
    I haven't heard any recent reports, but as far as I know, the EFL doesn't ever "pick up" any more. Those days are gone. Summer steelhead smolt plants have decreased from more than 70,000 to around 15,000. Take that and couple it with a reduction in smolt to adult return rates and you have, well, you have a river that I don't get many fishing reports about any more.

    Sg
     
    Flyborg likes this.
  3. james h.

    james h. New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ya it seems to be losing fish populations but just wondering because I live real close.

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk
     
  4. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2007
    Messages:
    1,266
    Likes Received:
    541
    Location:
    Vancouver WA


    our local Bio suggests that the river has around 1000 wild summer steelhead which is far better than it was just a short time ago ( while the massive stocking regime was in place) funny thing is that the wild fish are returning more adults than the hatchery plants did... less hatchery fish = better fishing.. the problem? the entire portion of the river that is open to public access has had it's habitat destroyed and no longer holds the fish.. bad habitat = bad fishing.. so where are all these wild fish??? above the destroyed habitat in the upper watershed waiting for fall rains at which time they will move farther still up into the creeks to do their thing.. if you want to catch one of them you need to put in your time. fish several times a week and one of those times you'll find them as they are passing through. you cannot however go out a couple times a season and expect to have a chance.

    what's a better option for you? hmm there are none we have thoroughly screwed the pooch with our local rivers.. maybe try the South Toutle they still plant it with run destroying smolts..
     
    Phil Fravel likes this.
  5. james h.

    james h. New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    1
    It really is a shame:( You are right though, I gotta put in more time if I'm hoping to catch a stealie. That all makes a lot of sense thanks for the info Rob!

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk
     
  6. ctcooney

    ctcooney New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2012
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    2
    I can confirm that this is 100% true :) But there are some very nice stretches to not catch a fish on. Also, if you do go out in the next couple of months watch out for smolts as they are aggressive as hell and will attack pretty much any fly you put near them.
     
  7. james h.

    james h. New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ya I realized that last weekend. I hooked
    3 of em hahah

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk
     
  8. rmflyrods

    rmflyrods Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Camas, WA
    So true. I fish a close-by river the same way. Fish it a few times a week, in the same 3 or 4 spots and you'll occasionally get a fish that passing through. People often ask why I'm there instead one of the popular destinations. I quickly find out they tried once or twice and when nothing happened, they give up. The upshot is, the river is mostly empty except for a few stubborn locals in the know.
     

Share This Page