Electric motor on pontoon?

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by BillFromBothell, Apr 23, 2007.

  1. BillFromBothell

    BillFromBothell New Member

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    I just got a new pontoon boat for fishing the Bitterroot and maybe the Yak this summer. I got an Outcast Discovery 9'. I'm thinking of trying it on the local lakes for trout. I don't mind rowing, in fact I prefer it, but I have a small electric trolling motor that hasn't been used in years that I would like to try out. It's a regular stern mount clamp-on type.

    My question is, how does one run the motor in the back while sitting facing forward on the pontoon boat? Do you have to be a contortionist to work the controls and steer? Or am I thinking of doing this the wrong way?
     
  2. craigatkins

    craigatkins New Member

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    Good question, I just bought a new 9' pontoon and bought a small 36 lbs. thrust Minn Kota to hook up on it. I set it up and it kind of sits right over my right shoulder. I figure I can row to the area that I will fish in and then use it to troll in my favorite lake spots. good luck, I will be monitoring this thread for advice.
     
  3. tythetier

    tythetier Fish Slayer

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    THE CONTORTIONIST IDEA IS NOT TOO FAR OUT. YOU DO HAVE TO REACH BACK TO STEER AND THROTTLE IT UP OR DOWN. TRY TO GET THE MOTOR UP AS HIGH AS YOU CAN (OR TO FIND THAT COMFORTABLE SPOT). I DONT MIND ROWING EITHER, BUT YOU HAUL A$$ WITH A TROLLING MOTOR. I WILL LASH ONTO MY BUDDIES TOON AND WE WILL CRUISE TWO WIDE AND STILL MOVE PRETTY GOOD.

    HOPE THIS HELPS

    TY
     
  4. DeanHosh

    DeanHosh New Member

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    You might want to check out http://www.batterystuff.com

    They have a nice selection of glass matte batteries. These batteries can be placed on their sides because they don't contain liquids.

    As alternative, I got a 2.5 Hp 4 stroke. Weighs in at 29 pounds. Internal tank for about 40 mins of travel. I will carry an extra 32 oz for backup. That should get me pretty far.

    I don't know, but a trolling motor and batteries might be getting up there in weight. Also a 1/2 charged battery weighs the same as a fully charged one. Plus you will need a charger and need to go out with a full charge.

    But then again a remote control on the trolling motor could be really cool. Just need a jump suit and hit the Bass Master circuit.

    I plan on using my toon in the San Juans so I needed the extra power.

    Dean
     
  5. Gary C. Brown

    Gary C. Brown Les Paul Lover

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    I was out at Kapowsin scaring fish yesterday, and saw a guy that had a pontoon with a electric trolling motor and he was doing just fine. Looked a little heavy in the back but he had no problems.
    Give it a shot.
     
  6. Pat M

    Pat M Chasing Tiger Trout

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    To answer your question the best way is on your motor just under the head there is a set screw. If you take the screw out and turn the head 180 degrees and put the set screw back through the shaft. Now you can be pulled backwards and the handle will be right behind you.

    To answer you second question is once your on the lake use your fins as a rudder. Alittle practice and you'll be running circle around your buddies. It actually took me a day before I got the hang of using the fins to stear. I dont even take my oars with me anymore. Thats only if your talking about using the only on a lake. Oh one other thing is I just use the Caddis Fins and they work just fine.
     
  7. Josh Brower

    Josh Brower AKA Salmon, Trout, Steelheader

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    get a piece of pvc and put it around the handle and clamp it on. that works well.
     
  8. Snake

    Snake tryin' not to get too comfortable

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    iagree

    An extended handle helps.

    So does a seat that swivels, so you can ride sideways, and more easily reach the motor handle. You can find seat swivels that fit toon boat seats for around $20-$25.

    The newer Minn Kotas have accessories that allow foot mount, or even remote-controlled (off of a wrist-mounted unit) steering! If/when I upgrade, I might check those out. And get a jump suit and some sweet shades. And change my user name to "Bass Masterson". Well, probably not......

    Side-mounted motors seem to be more finicky to steer in a straight line. If you can mount it in the center, your toon will track better.

    I was on Spring Lake yesterday, trying out my new float tube, and wishing I had my toon. It's easier to get longer casts when I'm farther up off the water, it seems. And there was a guy slowly trolling around with a fly rod (on a toon with a motor) who was gettin' into fish, and making it look real casual.....
     
  9. Tony Mull

    Tony Mull Member

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    I see guys in BC do this all the time. Just keep the motor pushing you straight ahead and use one oar to steer, much as you would guide a canoe. You only have to turn to adjust speed. One fellow had a kill switch for starting and stopping, I fished near him for hours and never saw him turn around till he started to head in and then he kicked up the speed. I have used my old 15lb diehard circa 1980 with a long handle and it was not too satisfactory, the setup mentioned above appeared to work much better.
     
  10. Brian P

    Brian P Member

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    I put a swivel mount under my seat and sit sideways on the pontoon boat. I get a lot of flack from my buddies as I am WAY to comfortable but its awesome. Kick your feet up, sit back, and enjoy the ride. It is pretty easy to keep it going in a straight line with little movements on the motor handle. Another bonus is when the water temp is really cold you can sit at an angle with your feet out of the water. Works great if the fishing is slow and you want to take a nap too. :D
    Just my $.02.

    Brian
     
  11. Gorgefly

    Gorgefly Member

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    If you really get lazy try this.....I used to fish with a guy who had a series of cables rigged to his electric motor so he could steer with pedals he created! I still prefer a hybrid tube/pontoon so that my hands are always free.
     
  12. craigatkins

    craigatkins New Member

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    Costco has a 8 1/2 ft. pontoon boat with plenty of storage pouches, motor mount and batter tray, nice oars, all for 299.00. I used it at Wallowa lake in early april and it worked great. I was primarily just trolling with gear for Kokanee but stopped and tried out the 4 wt. and it was much easier than out of a tube.
     
  13. Jason Baker

    Jason Baker Member

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    Americans are growing more obese by the day. Row, row, row that flab away.....
     
  14. Jason

    Jason Trout Bum

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  15. Josh Brower

    Josh Brower AKA Salmon, Trout, Steelheader

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    that is awesome!
     
  16. Shaggy

    Shaggy Northern Neighbor

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    Back when Pontoons were a new and novel thing, I built one for myself. I took and old electric motor, decapitated it, installed the motor in the back and mounted the head with all the controls up front on a pivot. I rigged up a simple cable steering system and ended up with a very servicable craft.

    A few observations:

    99% of the time I kept the motor pushing straight backwards and used flippers on my feet to steer. It was incredibly effective and provided effortless, hands free control, even in extremely windy conditions.

    The main benifit of having the motor head mounted up front was the ease of on/off and speed control. In the past few years I have helped a few friends mount motors on their store-bought pontoons, but now instead of going through the bother of decapitating the motor and rigging up cable steering, we just wire in a simple on/off switch on the positive battery cable up front where it is easy to get at without contorting. For most motors a simple 115V household light switch will handle the load, but if you want you can go and buy a switch more suited for the task, and a DPDT (double pole, double throw) switch can be wired up to give you directional control on non-maximizer style motors (do your homework first on that last idea though!)

    Most of a days fishing can be accomplished without adjusting speed or direction, but on/off is nice to have at hand. Cheap belly boat fins on your feet will give you all the direction control you'll need, and even provide a fair bit of speed control. I've always found oars to be a bit of a bother due to needing both hands to use, and occaisionally getting flylines looped around them. Flippers will provide good back-up power should you kill you battery.

    The idea listed a few posts up about flipping the motor head around on the shaft is a good one, I've done that a few times too as it puts the speed control at easier reach for if/when you do want it.

    jon
     

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