EVEN YEAR PINKS

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by mtlhead, Aug 23, 2002.

  1. mtlhead Member

    Posts: 384
    Concrete, WA, USA
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    I read a Quote that Curt Kreamer made about the increasing number of "Even year Pinks" that have been entering our river systems, Specifically the Snohomish system. This was news to me and I can't say that I've noticed this while fishing for Summer Run Steelhead or Silvers. Did anyone else hear this or have you seen the trend he (Kreamer) spoke of?
  2. Preston Active Member

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    Perhaps the apparent increase is due to the improved ocean survival conditions that gave us that gave us the huge (in overall numbers as well as size of individual members) humpy returns of last year. Something certainly seems to be going right for the ugly little buggers. I am certainly no one to be second-guessing Curt Kraemer, but I can recall some even-numbered years in the past when, for instance, Pilchuck Creek seemed to have almost as many pinks in it as it would have in an odd-numbered year.
  3. cuponoodle breakfast gritty

    Posts: 1,655
    Arlington
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    The article I read stated that they spawn much lower in the rivers than their odd year cousins. For example, it said that the even year pinks in the Stillaguamish don't spawn above Silvana. I think it also said the Stilly pinks are likely strays from the Snohomish.
  4. mtlhead Member

    Posts: 384
    Concrete, WA, USA
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    I'm just surprised that there has not been any caught by myself while chasing fish from the beach?
  5. I was fishing for cutts on the lower stilly by the cement plant and up above the bridge there was some salmon rolling I was thinking they were some early silvers but maybe they were humpies, I didn't go up and take a closer look though. Cutt fishing was kinda slow only turned one small one and a couple of short strikers. In years past I have caught and seen a few even year humpies in the Stilly not many but they do show up.
  6. Old Man Just an Old Man

    Posts: 21,631
    Dillon, Mt
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    I might be old---but I'm good.

    How do you access the river below the cement plant. I usually fish down by Silvana or where the Pilchuck runs in. Pink flies???

    Jim
  7. steve New Member

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    I don't know about the Stilly, but I saw a lot of Pinks yesterday while hiking along the Snohomish. Some gear guys in boats were catching and releasing a lot of fish.
  8. mtlhead Member

    Posts: 384
    Concrete, WA, USA
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    Ancient Chineese Secret..... No the farthest down that I've fished from the bank is the hole where the 2 channels of the main Stilly meet below town(behind the concrete plant).There are a couple of spots just above Marine View Dr. but there's not wadin' there. To really fish any lower I think you need to float it down from the tavern in Sylvana or power up from Marine View Dr.
  9. Ahh but Confuscious says there are many ways to wade the stilly if you know where to go. It is possible during low flow years to wade from silvana all the way to warm beach hiway. Even a little grasshopper like me can do it, a tall person has a much better chance of doing this now this year.
  10. ClarkiClarki New Member

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    We caught one a couple of weeks ago while fishing coho in the saltwater. That is the first one I have caught in the salt in an off year. :DUNNO
  11. Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

    Posts: 2,115
    Shoreline, WA, U.S.
    Ratings: +467 / 1
    just remember, throw 'em back

    my uncle just caught a humpy at the tulalip bubble while fishing for kings (he also hooked two kings, only landed one 23lbr, the other one was bigger and came unbuttoned). my geuss was that it (the pink) was headed for the stilly or it was playing the tide before heading into the snohomish. they are a fun fish i cant wait for them to start being an every year event!
  12. dlw New Member

    Posts: 105
    Moscow, ID
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    I guess I'll have to go against the grain on this topic. Pinks every other year is enough. The though of having to put up with them every year scares me. Last year when we had the huge run of pinks, they took over every Puget Sound river system and ruined cutt and silver fishing from September through October. Every time I tried to go cutt fishing, all I could catch was those slimy things. Most of em couldn't fight their way out of a wet paper sack, and around spawning time made the river smell really good :AA.
    I've been looking foward to a humpyless fall, and hearing news of an even year run makes me want to cry. I know some poeple enjoy fishing for them, but I see em as the weeds of the river. If they held and spawned near the tidewater, I guess it wouldn't be all bad. With the way their numbers are increasing though It's hard to say how much their range will increase.
  13. ClarkiClarki New Member

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    I have to completely agree with dlw on this issue. Every other year is enough. They really do seem to displace the src and everything else in the river due to their large numbers. I am looking forward to a humpyless fall as well......
  14. cuponoodle breakfast gritty

    Posts: 1,655
    Arlington
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    Good points. I enjoy fishing for humpies but there are some drawbacks. The biggest in my mind is the crowds that stumble to the river when they hear they can keep a few salmon.
  15. KerryS Ignored Member

    Posts: 6,714
    Sedro Woolley, WA, USA.
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    If you know where to look for searuns during a big humpy year you can have glory days.

    Without giving up when and where I will only say to look for cutts in those places where they can get away from the hustle and bustle of the humpy.

    Last year was a record hump year and we killed the silvers.
  16. Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

    Posts: 2,115
    Shoreline, WA, U.S.
    Ratings: +467 / 1
    just remember, throw 'em back

    i agree with KerryS. SRC's and Dollies (although illegal) can be caught in great numbers even while the river is chock full of humpies. i would try to bounce an egg pattern along the bottom as last year a TON of SRC's, dollies, and baby steelies went ape for some discarded humpy eggs. i threw them in after i kept a bright humpy for the barby last year on the stilly. as soon as the eggs hit the water fish came out of the woodwork and they ate every last one of those eggs. maybe i'm weird but i could never get enough of a 5lb humpy bucking around on the end of a 4 weight. just my $.02
  17. nicoldrysdale New Member

    Posts: 53
    victoria, bc, canada.
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    hey dlw,

    I've fished pinks and coho off the beach on Vancouver Island for the last ten years.

    (There's some fishermen who are constantly lettin' you know how many fish they catch - generally to impress; i'm usually first in the queue to slag them - it's only in defense of the pink that i mention numbers at all).
    In the last two months i've hooked into more than a hundred coho off the beach; i've got some experience with their fighting qualities.

    Pinks also have the reputation up here that they are poor fighters and are easy to catch (invariably this opinion is held by fishermen who fish from boats). On August 10, there was a wall of fish 30' deep for 500 yards on either side of an estuary on the east coast of Vancouver Island.
    I sat on a log for 2 hours and watched 47 flyfishermen have a shot at them. Of the 47 anglers, only one was catching fish. The 46 others didn't think pinks were that easy to catch. I recently mentioned on another thread that a few weeks ago a fly fisherman, new to the sport (with a very dodgy cast), caught in the region of 20 coho in a float tube in one day.

    I'm not the only guy up here who admires the pink. In fact, a couple of days ago i was discussing this same topic with a friend who is considered by many as one of the best fly fisherman in B.C.; he's an exec. at Islander reels, he writes numerous articles and has just returned from fishing for tarpon and permit in Florida. The only reason I mention the latter ( which he wouldn't) is simlpy for the purpose of establishing that his opinion on the fighting qualities of a fish warrants consideration.
    He greatly admires the pink and concurred that it was the most underated fish on the west coast and concurred that, pound for pound, it put up a harder and smarter fight than coho.

    This defense of the pink is not to establish it as a better fish than the coho - not at all; however, I think this salmon deserves more respect than it currently gets.

    Personally, i feel fortunate to have the privelege of fly fishing for it.

    Dl, maybe it's not so much that the pinks up here are a better strain than the ones down there in Washington but, rather, that our coho up here are wimps compared to yours. :WINK

    cheers
    nic
  18. Preston Active Member

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    Hear, hear! Pinks don't get no respect, but caught in saltwater they are hard, if not spectacular, fighers giving a very good account of themselves on a 5- or 6-weight outfit. Killed, cleaned and iced quickly they can be excellent fare on the barbecue as well.
  19. SeaClarki New Member

    Posts: 45
    Seattle, Wa.
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    nic,

    I think I know exactly what river mouth you talk about, I was up there from seattle and fished that afternoon on the 10th. That school of fish was amazing! Funny thing was, with the wind, I don't think the fishers next too me even relized you could see the fish as they would give me a funny look when I said I could. As for the pinks fighting abbilites, I was very impressed. I was fishing an 8 wt to combat the wind and still had a blast with the pinks. One thing i noticed was that the fishing completely died off when the tide was rising near dark, I fished late and failed to catch anything. I too noticed That relatively few people were catching fish during the day, seemed like only a handfull were having consistent success. Trip was sure a nice break from my recently unsuccessful steelhead fishing down here in Wa.lol :HAPPY
  20. dlw New Member

    Posts: 105
    Moscow, ID
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    I would have to agree that when they are fresh they put up a good fight although I've never had one make a reel burning run and have never seen one jump durring a battle. Coho on the other hand jump, spin, run and tail dance, even after they are old and turn color. After humpies are in freshwater a week or so their fight really goes downhill. This is when they become an annoyance. In the middle to upper reaches of a river they clog up every hole and spawn across every tailout, making wading very difficult.
    I wouldn't consider them underated at all, well at least not in Puget Sound. During September of an odd year the rivers are packed full of snaggers and fishermen. Even fly fishing for them is getting popular. I often enjoy fly fishing for them, but after catching 20 or so it gets a little boring and I go back to fishing for cutts.