Favorite easy dry fly patterns

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by troutaholic, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. SG New Member

    Posts: 6
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I live in sweden so I don't know wich insects to imitate.
    Is it much ants swarming in the summer? Caddis swarms, or mayflyinvation...

    Becouse i only fish in Scandinavia I don't know any good flies for you, but if you show me some insects maybee I can rekommend some swedish patterns with american colors.

    "Sorry for my worthless english"
    // Simon Kjaeldgaard Greising
  2. troutaholic Member

    Posts: 289
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Thanks Spey! I've gotten great responses on the dry flies but none on the chironomids except for yours :) I'm going to tie some of your pattern up this week! I've seen some other small fly patterns (like the original RS2) that require a straight eye hook. Why is that necessary? Is it for better hooking qualities or a more lifelike shape of the fly? Thanks again for the great recipe and detailed instructions... :beer1
  3. troutaholic Member

    Posts: 289
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Hey Simon thanks for your reply. Here in the Northwest, we don't typically see alot of mayfly hatches (at least I don't on the rivers that I fish- except maybe the Yakima). What I see alot of though are small dark caddis flies (about size 14-18). I think they may also be called "sedges". They're almost always around, and then occasionally I see a mini "hatch" of somewhat larger caddis flies a little larger (12-16) and a little lighter in color. I guess this is why out here we use alot of attractor patterns, chironomids, and terrestrials. What patterns do you use in Scandanavia that might work? By the way, I spent some time years ago in northern Norway- such beautiful country, I 've always wanted to return :D ...
  4. SG New Member

    Posts: 6
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Ok. Then I got some patterns for you.
    First of all you have the superpupa.

    Hook: Dryfly size of your choice.
    Tyingthread: Colour that is similiar to the head of the imitated insect.
    Body: 2/3 In your case dark flyrite. 1/3 (The colour on the frontbody of the insect your'e imitating.
    Bodyhackle: Use similiar colour as the legs on the insect to be imitated.
    The hackle should be hakled all over the body with the fibres facing slightly forwards.
    After tying the fly, cut the hacklefibres over and under the fly, so that the hackle only sticks out on the sides.

    This fly is very popular in Scandinavia and it can be tied in millions of colourcombinations.

    Good luck!:professor
  5. gotchasr Member

    Posts: 333
    Kirkland, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    If you are looking for an easy chironomid pattern, there is nothing easier than a snowcone. White enamel bead head, wire rib, and a thread body tapered to the bead. Tie it on a Tiemco 200R, or equivalent. Very, very effective.
  6. troutaholic Member

    Posts: 289
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    What colors/sizes do you find to be most effective?
  7. SG New Member

    Posts: 6
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    >What colors/sizes do you find to be most effective?

    In sweden, yellow/black, olive/yellow olive/brown is common colorcombos.
    Sizes between 14-18. 16 is a good size.
    Make sure that the hackle isn't to long.
    Good quality hackle is required.
  8. Curtis King Fish Magnet

    Posts: 219
    Richland, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Hey trouty,
    The reason I use straight eye hooks, right or wrong, is related to the chironomid and how it hatches. Next time you are on the water and you see them hatching, look closely below the surface for rising larve. My observations indicate that they swim (float) STRAIGHT up from the bottom. A curved eye hook can cause the bug to rise in a zig-zag pattern when drawn throught the water. To best mimic their pattern, I use straight eye hooks and a loose loop to tie them on. That way they stay STRAIGHT up even as you draw them through the water.

    :beer2
  9. troutaholic Member

    Posts: 289
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Thanks Spey! I'll check out the naturals the next time I can....
  10. gotchasr Member

    Posts: 333
    Kirkland, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I don't know if the size/color question was directed at me, but the colors I use most are black and olive. However, you should probably also have some brown and red. Sizes...well, that depend in part on where you plan on fishing. As a general rule I tend to carry sizes 10-22.:p , but if you want something more reasonable I'd say sizes 12-18 would cover just about any situation.
  11. darik guy without a clever handle

    Posts: 125
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    hey 'holic.
    The dries I use almost exclusively for searching are a sz 14 Parachute Adams, sz 12 Olive EHC, and a sz 8 Yellow Stimulator (especially summer/fall). I think it's just a matter of personal preference more than the fish's selectivity.

    Here's a good midge emerger pattern, maybe someone can help me remember what it is or where it came from. Seems like I got most of the idea from a pattern discussed on this group last year.

    Standard dry hook, sz 18 or so.
    Body of stripped peacock herl (keep it thin), small thorax of Black fine dry dubbing, and a deer hair wing. The wingcase is tied in tips facing backward between the body and thorax, and then pulled forward over the thorax and secured with a few thread wraps. There's about 1/8" or so of deer hair flared out at the top of the fly, which floats really low in the film.
    It's a great pattern, I caught a few large rainbows taking emerging chironomids at Lenice last spring with it. Kudos to whoever originally found/invented it.
  12. troutaholic Member

    Posts: 289
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Sounds like a great pattern Darik! I've been mostly getting sinking chironomid patterns and I've been hoping for one that I could fish just under the surface, especially under a foam line. Last year nearly all my larger trout were caught fishing through a foam line but I couldn't get my nymphs to stay in an emerging kinda float (they eventually just sank!) and I could sometimes see chironomids emerging! I can't wait to tie some up!
    :thumb
  13. pwoens Active Member

    Posts: 2,570
    Spokane, Washington, USA.
    Ratings: +5 / 0
    The Madam X or Ugly Rudemous. Both are simple to tie yet they are the most affective patterns I own.

    ~Patrick ><>
  14. troutaholic Member

    Posts: 289
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Thanks Patrick! Love that name- "Ugly Rudemous" you don't happen to know where I could find the pattern? I'm hoping to head over to the Yak for this weekend with some new experimental flies :)
    Charlie
  15. Flip The dumb kid

    Posts: 806
    Lk Stevens WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    try an ice cronnie, ill try to get a picture of one here sometime real soon. very simple tie, and it fishes very well. for dries, my personal favorite i only saw mentioned once, the humpie. want somthing deadly? tie it with a green body. dont know what it is but i have had great success with it