Filoplume Mayfly SBS

Discussion in 'Fly Tying Step by Step' started by ScottP, Dec 5, 2012.

  1. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    Another breathable (the filoplume really comes to life in water) nymph, like the Feather Duster; found this one while poking through Randall Kaufmann's great Fly Tyer's Nymph Manual. It was a very sad day when Kaufmann's Streamborn closed an their catalogs stopped coming; always regretted that I never got to visit the shops.


    hook - Tiemco 200R #12
    thread - Uni 8/0 camel/UTC 70 brown (I'll explain)
    tail/abdomen - marabou
    rib - copper wire x-small
    thorax - filoplume/aftershaft
    wingcase -peacock herl



    mash barb and attach thread and wire 1 hook eye width back from eye; keep tag end of wire on far side of hook bend

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    wrap wire back to point above hook barb

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    measure a marabou feather (abdomen length)

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    tie down; keep marabou fibers on top of hook and wrap up to thorax

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    tie in another marabou feather (on smaller hooks, you could do tail & body with 1 feather) by the tips

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    gather marabou

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    and wrap body to thorax (helps build thorax up a bit for the filoplume)

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    counterwrap wire rib up through thorax, helicopter and tie off

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    tie in some peacock herl for wingcase (original pattern calls for sword fibers but they're a bit flimsy for me)

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    prepare a filoplume/aftershaft feather (I cut away the bottom; shaft is a bit too thick to spin properly)

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    as I was preparing to put the filoplume in the split thread, I realized I was using Uni 8/0; great thread for a lot of tying but not one that lends itself readily to splitting. Half hitch and clip off the Uni, re-load the bobbin with the UTC (Danville 6/0 would work great, too) and we're back in action. Split the thread

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    insert the filoplume

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    spin the bobbin, trapping the filoplume and creating a "chenille" (much easier than trying to tie and wrap these very delicate feathers)

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    moisten fingers and stroke chenille back while wrapping forward (5 shots and I couldn't get 1 to focus)

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    thorax complete

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    pull peacock herl forward to form wingcase; tie off and trim

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    whip finish, SHHAN

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    Any stray fibers in the thorax can be plucked; you can also shorten/thin out the thorax with a few well placed tugs if you're of a mind.



    Regards,
    Scott
     
    Jackd likes this.
  2. zen leecher aka bill w

    zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

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    Good step by step instruction. I believe Gene Armstrong initiated this as he used to play with a lot of filoplume. The patterns were incorporated into the Kaufmann's book after Gene died.
     
  3. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Geez, I wonder what was up with that? He waited until the guy died? Weird.
     
  4. zen leecher aka bill w

    zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

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    Gene died suddenly. He was working on the patterns in the early 80's and died somewhere in 85 or 86. You probably know Gene worked part time in the Bellevue Kaufmann's. Gene gave me copies of other filoplume flies he was working on and they really wiggle in water. My assumption on the addition to the book is a revised edition was published and the flies were added on that enlarged edition.
     
  5. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    I knew he got credit for the Filoplume Damsel:

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    didn't know about the mayfly, although that makes sense. Thanks for providing the history.

    Regards,
    Scott
     
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    The theory of the fluffy feathers "breathing" in the water hasn't panned out for me. It seems logical but evidently I must be inadvertently applying fish repellent to the patterns when I use filoplume because I've yet to catch a trout on such a pattern.
     
  7. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Forgive my ignorance, but I can't quite picture what feather you are exactly using for the filoplume. Is it like the little fuzzy feather that hides behind the pheasant rump feather that I normally use for careys and such?
     
    Patrick Gould likes this.
  8. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    Gary,

    That's it.

    Regards,
    Scott
     
  9. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Thanks Scott!
     
  10. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    And all this time I've been throwing them away because I thought they were useless.....not anymore!

    Sent from my SGH-T679 using Tapatalk 2
     
  11. Coomba

    Coomba New Member

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    Scott,
    Your SBS are great. Thank you for your effort.
     

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