finding the spine

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by mike doughty, Jul 31, 2004.

  1. mike doughty Honorary Member

    Posts: 10,189
    the uinta's
    Ratings: +5 / 0
    i have built about a 1/2 dozen rods so far with no problems. what i am wondering is, is it important to match the spine of the butt section of the blank to the spine of the tip section. it is a little harder to determine which spine is bigger on the butt section. i just built a sage rod and marked the biggest spine on the tip and tried to do the same on the butt, but in doing that the logo is upside down on my rod now.:dunno :dunno :dunno
  2. willieboat Member

    Posts: 444
    Lacey, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I'm almost done with building a Sage four piece rod. I noticed that on this one, Sage has placed white dots on the spine area on the top three sections, after doing the spine check, the white dots seem to indicate the spine. On the butt section, you need not be concerned about the spine as it is very strong and thick.
  3. rodboy New Member

    Posts: 8
    woodinville, washington, usa.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    The white dots on a Sage blank are to indicate the straightest line the blank has and the line they want you to place the guides. If the dots land on spine it's by chance. The design of Sage blanks dosn't demand that the guides lay on spline. I've built hundred's and they cast the same on or off spline. I took some pictures of some of our feather inlays. They can be viewed at http://www.msnusers.com/fethastyxfeathers. Feel free to take a look. Rodboy
  4. rodboy New Member

    Posts: 8
    woodinville, washington, usa.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Depending on who you want to believe, some say (Loomis) that spline should be at 3 or 9 o'clook and the guides at 6. General rule of thumb is to place guides on spline but with pre printed logo's like Sage they feel that they are right and since Don Green is the father of graphite fishing rods I think he's right. The butt section is the most important as far as using the spline to it's maximum. The strongest section of the rod and harnessing it's spline for the maximum power available for that blank. It's more important to place the guides exactly on spline for a casting or spinning rod as if you miss the spline the rod will cast left or right of target and torgue when fighting big fish. For the rod builder who only builds one or two in his life I'd suggest work on getting the guies as close to spline as you can but more importantly get them straight. Rodboy
  5. mike doughty Honorary Member

    Posts: 10,189
    the uinta's
    Ratings: +5 / 0
    So your saying that with the sage's spine isn't as important as with others. if i lay the guides to match the white dots then i should be good, right? thanks
  6. rodboy New Member

    Posts: 8
    woodinville, washington, usa.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Exactly correct- set the reel seat where the logo is at 3:00, holding the rod with the reel down that would be on the right side of the blank, it reads correctly over there also. Align all of the dots together and set you guides down that line that aligns with the dots, very simple. When building a blank that dosn't give you those marks, then the whole ball game changes. Sage is one of the easiest to build and definatly one of the very best blanks you can get you hands on. At present we have about 75 blanks in stock both fly and we have a load of non-fly blanks that are rare from Sage. When our new web site is up and running, any day, you'll be able to rummage through the best toy store you've ever seen.