Fishin' Deep

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by bakerite, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. bakerite

    bakerite Active Member

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    I went to my local reservoir today and yesterday with moderate success.....It's full of planters from late spring that are running about 8 to 10 inches long. If I fish the margins I catch them all day long and maybe a couple of the two or three year old fish. Fishing the 10 to 15 foot depth, I catch a couple of these 14 to 18 inch fish each hour fishing buggers or crayfish imitations on a type 5 line. Today I was out by the point I like to fish around and checked out the deeper water. It drops to 35 feet just a few feet out from where I have been catching fish. My fish finder started marking lots of fish in this area.....not the usual three or four strays I see in a day. I tried fishing chironimids straight down with my sinking line and a split shot......no love. I'm in a tube and there was a fair amount of wind so it's a little hard to stay still. I also tried letting out all my line + some backing and slow trolling. Does anyone have advice on trying to fish real deep?
     
  2. Irafly

    Irafly Active Member

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    An anchor, and a full sink fished vertical, or an indicator set exactly where you saw the fish on the electronics.
     
  3. IveofIone

    IveofIone Active Member

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    +1 on the Rio Deep 7
     
  4. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

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    With the above high-powered recommendations, I suppose that I'll have to get one.
     
  5. triploidjunkie

    triploidjunkie Active Member

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    I used to use a rio deep seven for years until this summer when it finally wore out. There is a three hundred grain fifty foot sink tip on my bank robber that gets deep faaast. Too fast sometimes if there isn't current. Works great on omak lake and rufus when it's cold and the fish go deep. I'm definitely going to get another deep seven for my six weight.
     
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  6. triploidjunkie

    triploidjunkie Active Member

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    +1 on the anchor. Especially when breezy. I never use flippers in my toon, but don't leave shore without my anchor.
     
  7. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    +1
     
  8. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    I use an old teeny 300 grain sink tip for deep fishing and speed trolling. my friend also bought a 400 grain sink tip. these sink tips have a dark 26 to 30 ft. tip and then a much lighter floating running line so figuring out how to get to the depth you want is much easier - for me at least - I use the 300 grain on my 10' 6 wt. mid flex 8.0 rod and it throws it just fine. then I can also fish deep holes in rivers for steelhead with the same line on a 8 wt.

    I have to say I do not like heavy sinking lines where the 90 ft. of line sinks. to much belly sink most of the time and missed takes beings they pull on the belly instead of the rod. heavy sink tips still do this but much less and can be used for steelhead in deep fast water. and they sink fast to vertical - then knowing where your 26 ft. (or how ever long the head is) mark of brighter line is, makes it much easier if you ask me. "just my preference" and they can be found for cheap if you look around.
     
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  9. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    Good point. My deep fishing and vertical line is a SA Streamer Express. It has a 27.5' Type 5 head and a bright red intermediate sink running line.
     
  10. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    well bakerite wish I was over that way to tag team the fishies! I do not use split shot when going vertical I use a heavy sink tip and weighted chiro's at least 3 ft. apart if not 4 to 5 ft. apart with the thought that sometimes the fish do not like flies to close to each other (from what I have found "sometimes") and split shot to close would spook them also in clear water. but I think you wold me the lake had some green to it - like I said wish I was over that way, but A friend wont leave me along about going after fall chinook at the coast gear fishing. the things us fisherman have to do!
     
  11. bakerite

    bakerite Active Member

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    Thanks a to all. I have until next Tuesday (closing day) this year to figure this out. So I may be able to make a couple of trips if the weather is OK. I am mapping the lake and am looking forward to next Spring when the new plants are a couple of inches bigger and there are more defined hatches. I'll be getting a couple of new lines. Has anyone used one of the Albright fast sinking lines, they are reasonably priced and come in a variety of weights (by grains). The other thing I wonder about on this lake is how the dropping water levels effect the bugs (at this time the acreage is less than half of what it is in the Spring)....I have not noticed strong hatches here very often, some calibatis and caddis. Most of the bottom is mud and I would think any organism that is in the mud (chironimids) would perish when the level of the lake goes down. Comments?
     
  12. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    If I remember you said it has a tan chiro hatch? remember that tan chiro I was fishing that derek would not change from! he wouldn't change because it works so good at imitating both the tan traveling caddis and the tan chiro's. I would just tie it smaller for the lake you mention like on a size 14 scud hook! one pattern with white bead and one with tungsten dark bead and see witch one they want. if any hatch survives I would say it would be the chiro's but I have seen traveling tan caddis in the snow in dec. on the west side! But the chiro's seem to like deeper water. just some thoughts for you!
     
  13. bakerite

    bakerite Active Member

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    Good thoughts Mark, in Pilcher it would make sense that all the chiro's would be living in the water that is there at this time of year.....so it will be twenty feet deeper in the Spring.....I know they can migrate but the hatches would start in the deep water. I'll be trying some different stuff this weekend, and buying a new line.
     

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