fishing for meat

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by martyg, Mar 29, 2006.

  1. alpinetrout

    alpinetrout Banned or Parked

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    In Australia, I learned a technique for deflating bloated swim blatters by taking your fillet knife and making a clean puncture right behind the pectoral fin, under the edge of a row of scales. If necessary, you could give the fish a gentle squeeze to help the excess air out. It sounds brutal, but it works great and reportedly doesn't cause any major damage to the fish when done carefully, usually healing within a few days. The guy who showed me has a doctorate in fisheries biology, so I'm taking his word for it. The technique was developed in Florida to help deal with release of undersized bottomfish such as grouper.
     
  2. ceviche

    ceviche Active Member

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    iagree Same goes for Rockfish in general. Some of you might want to propose retroactive abortion upon your teenagers, but most rockfish of any decent size are as old. Be kind to both.

    :thumb: Beware of bottomfish!
     
  3. polepole

    polepole New Member

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    There has been some promising techniques employed in CA in which they use a upside down weighted milkcrate to deliver inflated rockfish back down to the depths. While I haven't used this technique, I HAVE used a barbless jig head to hook a rockfish in the lip and sink it back down. Tie the line to the bend in the hook and after you sink the rockfish back down, give it a tug and the hook will come out and the fish will swim free. Give this a try.

    -Allen
     
  4. MauiJim

    MauiJim ka lawai'a

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    A hypodermic syringe achieves the same effect (though often not handy in the field, unless you're doing research- I don't have one on me when I fish!), it's used when releasing the deepwater snapper in Hawaii-- opakapaka, anyone? :thumb:

    And Crazysalmon- it would be better if it was just scare tactics by bringing up toxins and long life spans-- except that the research backs it! Anything that grows up in Puget Sound (or Lake Washington, etc for that matter) probably shouldn't be eaten by women of childbearing age. There are some 'hot' fish cruising the beaches/depths... high human density + long-lived fishes = better to get fish from the Strait or Alaska :beer2:
     
  5. mr trout

    mr trout Trevor Hutton

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    You gotta have a syringe with you when you fish! How else do you puff the worms up to float 'em off the bottom?


    (Actually, that is my brother's favorite way of fishing, and dang it...it works...)
     
  6. Anil

    Anil Active Member

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    No. They are still a slow growing fish with a population that is a small fraction of their historical numbers. Keeping fish is not something that I have any moral or ethical opposition to. Like many fly fishermen, fish that I pursue have a higher ‘sport’ than table value to me. I would rather release a fish with questionable or low population numbers in the hope that I (or others) might catch and release it again in the future.
    In my relatively short life, I’ve seen a few Lingcod ‘hotspots’ decline, apparently through over-harvest. One I can think of in particular, held good numbers of large fish. The friend, who showed me this spot, would often keep his legal limit of fish. After several years of this, he was surprised and disappointed that the size and number of fish had declined. I was considerably less surprised.
    There are many fish that I have no problem keeping for the table. This is a decision that we must all make for ourselves.
     
  7. polepole

    polepole New Member

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    Cool Anil,

    I hope you didn't take my posting as confronting you in any way. When I read your quote of my post, it kinda sounded that way to me. It wasn't meant to be.

    Out of curiousity, what fish are on your list of "able to keep"?

    Regarding lingcod overfishing, I've seen the California ling populations rebound quite a bit in the past few years over a relatively short period of time. Much of his I can only attribute to the 20 fathom fishing restriction. Well, that and the closure of the season during the spring season. Indeed, sometimes there are so many underlings (<24") that they are pesky.

    Why do we open up the ling fishery in the sound in the month of May. Isn't it still the tail end of the spawn?

    -Allen
     
  8. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Well, I for one like to eat fish. Unfortunately this is something that increasingly presents challenges from ethical, conservation, and health standpoints.

    My "ground rules" on keeping fish for the table are as follows:

    1) Can I really use and appreciate this fish on my table?

    2) Are there any stock conservation concerns with keeping this fish?

    3) Is this a species I can purchase without supporting detrimental fish-farming or non-selective commercial fishing techniques?

    4) Are there any health concerns with eating this fish based on the species, size, and location of catch?

    5) Is this a marked hatchery fish that may present a genetic threat to native fish in a mixed-stock fishery?



    Of course, it goes without saying that these rules are in addition to angling regulations and catch limits.

    ------------------------------
     
  9. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

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    Nice set of ground rules, SilverFly. I agree with all of them, except that I bend #3, as the black rockfish I catch off the jetty here (mainly in the Spring) are alot fresher than the ones I get in the market. I only fish out there about once a week on average, and only keep a max of 6 fish (usually less...last time I kept one), as I don't want to have to fillet more than that!

    I remember back in the early 80's when I lived on the West side of Bainbridge Island, I would still catch True Cod, when jigging. In the Spring there were always scads of boats just South of the Agate Passage bridge going after them. Later, after I moved to the coast, I heard their stocks really got depleted and the fishery there collapsed.
    Does anyone know if their population is coming back?

    Jimbo
     
  10. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    Jim -
    While the occassional true cod is now caught in Puget Sound the population has not really bounced back at all. The fishery in the Agate Pass area was targeting the spawnig aggregations of the population resulting in the collapse of the fishery. It has been popular to "blame" the trawl (draggers) fishery for the collapse of the population but it is impossible to ignore the intense sport fishing on those spawning aggregations as a significant contributing factor

    The groundfish experts I have talked with tell me that Puget Sound is at the southern edge of the species distribution and it may well be decades (if ever) before the population rebounds to previous levels. They think it may take a special set of envirnomental conditions for a successful spawn and survival of the young to occur and at current abundances it may take several fsih generations with those conditions for some sort of recovery.

    Tight lines
    Curt
     
  11. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

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    Thanks Curt.
    Now that's a lesson! I would just fish the drop-off in front of the beach cabin I was renting at Crystal Springs. I would go out in my beater touring kayak, which I kept pulled up on the beach, and fish until I had one or two rockfish or cod, so I was always eating fresh fish...never caught enough at any one time to have to freeze them. My landlady "owned" the beach, too, and I'd get steamer clams whenever I wanted. The point got washed so heavily by the tide that "red tide" was never a problem. There were coho, blackmouth, and searun cutts there at times as well.

    Jimbo
     
  12. Anil

    Anil Active Member

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    “Silverfly”: Nice set of ground rules.
    Allen: No offense taken. I just didn’t want people to think that I was some sort of catch and release fanatic, which I am not. The truth is that I would much rather catch fish than eat them. So the decision to release fish is easier for me. Here is a list of the fish that I do keep: Hatchery Steelhead and Salmon, Wild Salmon and trout with healthy populations, and Albacore. Occasionally I will also keep a couple Black Rockfish from the coast or straits.
    Anil
     
  13. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Jim and Anil,

    Thanks, they work well for me. I understand what "fresh" rockfish really means (my mouth is watering just typing that). Yeah, #3 pretty much eliminates most fin-fish bought at the seafood counter, although I do buy some occassional rockfish fillets or halibut when I get a craving. Hopefully I won't have to visit the store for a while after my trip to Tofino this August :D .

    The only other rule I might add is taking non-native fish that displace or otherwise threaten native species. An example might be smallmouth bass in the Columbia. I did eat one I caught last year when steelhead fishing and it was delicious, but not sure I'd make a habit out of it due to rule #4.