Fishing the lakes

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by fsbii, May 28, 2002.

  1. fsbii

    fsbii New Member

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    Until June 1st i am concentrating on lakes in the area. Located in issaquah, i have tried a number of lakes, but most recently has been Rattlesnake lake and Pine lake. I am somewhat new to fly fishing the lakes, spending more time on the running water, so i have some questions. Rattlesnake lake the other day was fishing well with slow moving green wooly-bugger. Non-stop action, all be it they were 10 inch cuts, and a couple fat bows. This was my first time up there, and i was wondering if anyone has any suggestions on how i could step up and catch some bigger fish out there? Big fan of dry flies as well.

    Pine Lake on the other hand, i have fished more with a lure. I know there are some good sized bows and browns out there, having caught them throughout my childhood. But how would i go about hooking these on the fly rod? I threw a couple dry flies out there last year but results were nothing to talk about over a cold.

    Am i fishing decent lakes, any other killer lakes i need to try? Any info would be more than appreciated, i respect everyones advice, thanks.
     
  2. fly15

    fly15 New Member

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    If you want to get into some bigger trout you better head east to the tons of lakes over there with the average trout around 16-20" inches
    some of the lakes I will list here but there are tons more(Dryfalls, lenore, lenice, merry, nunnally, rocky for creek,big twin lake,and countless others). If your not ready to venture east yet I would go to either pass lake or cady lake they have better than average trout in them compared to the put and take lakes don't get me wrong the put and take lakes have some big fish but not the numbers of big fish as in fly only or selective gear rules lakes.Up untill this year my biggest trout on fly was about 16" inches and I changed that with a 22" inch brown from pass then a 25" lahontan cutt from lenore than two 26" incers from rocky ford creek. Put yourself on some of these quality waters and you will see the difference in the size of fish.
    GOOD LUCK. :THUMBSUP

    "LOVE'M AND LEAVE'M" C&R

    fly15
     
  3. ray helaers

    ray helaers New Member

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    Re fly15's suggestions. He's right about all of it. But when choosing between westside/eastside lakes, keep this in mind. From my house in downtown Seattle, Pass lake is about an hour and a half, just south of Anacortes, and Lenice is about 2 1/2, a little east of Vantage. By my rough calculation, that puts them both about two hours from you in Issaquah. Pass is nice, but it's not Lenice, which by any standard is one of the best trout fisheries in the West. Cady is at the end of a maze of dirt roads (not to mention a ferry ride) and I'll bet it's close to two hours from you. It's very good, worth fishing, but hardly closer than many places "way out east of the mountains."

    Don't forget that when most of us say "eastern" Washington, we really mean central, and the west side of the state is just about as big as the central, and in Issaquah, you kind of live in the middle.

    But by the way, Rattlesnake is not a bad lake to have in the backyard. It has a lot of small fish, but plenty of decent ones, and a few good ones now that they've started planting it with triploids. A Wooly bugger is never a bad choice, but as the fish become acclimated to the lake over the next few weeks, try using a more realistic food imitation, like a damsel or dragon nymph, or a chironomid to match anything you see emerging. You might bypass the suicidal little guys, and fool one of the "smarter" fish that have become naturalized to the lake's native food sources.
     
  4. fsbii

    fsbii New Member

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    Wow, thanks for the info. Yeha i figured i was hooking the diehard cutthroats that weren't to worried about what i was throwing at them. I found cady lake, but where are pass and lenice lakes?
     
  5. o mykiss

    o mykiss Active Member

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    I went to Rattlesnake a couple of weekends ago. I started fishing chironomids. Tried some really little olive ones, then little black, then little red. A couple of bites but no real takes. Then I put on a big black one (must be about a size 12 hook, scud style) with pink floss rib (which ends up looking kind of brown against the black thread body) and a few very short wisps of light brown marabou sticking out of the eye end of the hook. Wham, big fish hits the fly so hard it not only breaks me off but the force of the strike knocks the indicator (a corky, held in place with a toothpick) loose from the leader and it just floats away. Reel up, put on another indicator, and another of these ugly chironies on. Wham, another big fish. It thrashes around some and then spits the hook. Bummer. I keep fishing. Get into some smaller ones but can't get anything to stay on. Eventually reel up and look at the hook. It's bent out at about a 90 degree angle. Doh! No wonder. Last big fish must have bent the hook. I bent it back in place with the forceps. Catch one about a 10 incher. I also picked up a small one on a black midge emerger with a greenish flashabout rib and white foam on the back. Tried this fly because there were some really little (like size 20) creamy olive bugs hatching during late morning and bringing a lot of fish to the surface, and this was the only thing close to green I had (they actually looked white from a distance but when you picked them up you could see they were a creamy olive). There are some decent sized fish in the lake, from what I can tell. I saw gear folks trolling and pulling in some decent sized fish (unfortunately, usually killing them).
     
  6. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    I really like to fish local lakes, just to get away from the crowds, and to be able to sleep in, fish and get home early.

    Pine, Rattlesnake, Beaver, Cottage are the lakes I can name and let you live. Others are not mentionable unless you would prefer not to live any longer, you will have to open a map, scratch your head, and get lost to find these.

    As to how to fish lakes, I would recommend a few books and videos:

    "Morris and Chan on Fly Fishing Trout Lakes"
    by Skip Morris and Brian Chan

    "Fly Patterns for Stillwaters"
    by Phil Rowley

    "Flyfishing Strategies for Stillwaters" book and videos
    by Brian Chan

    Then there is seeing either Chan or Rowley in a seminar is another great thing.
     
  7. Tom Merrill

    Tom Merrill Member

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    Go to RESOURCES on this site and then click on Map Server. On the left hand side, you can click on Eastern Washington Lakes. Several of the mentioned lakes are on that list. It links to maps of the lakes that you can zoom out on to find their general area. Lenice is south of George off I-90. Dry Falls is north of Moses Lake heading north past Soap Lake. Happy Fishing!

    I personally have enjoyed all these lakes and highly recommend them.

    -Tom
     
  8. bugbitten

    bugbitten New Member

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    Fished Lenice the first time in March and again mid-May for the first and second time of my life. My prior experience has been river only so I'm learning the lakes but it's not too bad, especially with advice from this forum and flyshops. The fish are big and a float tube is highly recommended. You cross the vantage bridge and turn right and then the next exit a right to Beverly and the dam. You go under a train tressel and take a left to Beverly and the lake parking is on the right. Lenice is the last one and most recognizable as a parking lot. You'll see cars at about 2 spots before Lenice. Worth the trip for me from Gig Harbor so you've got almost an hour jump on me. I;m going next week or the week after again. Watch for rattle snakes on the way down (about a 1/4 mile walk from parking lot) as we walked right into one last time. Beware of wind, I had hi winds both times but if you go to the left end there is shelter so don;'t get too discouraged. Good luck,Ken
     

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