Flies for stillwater

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Chef, Dec 7, 2010.

  1. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    I read of a pattern that was nothing more than a wrapped hook with wool, tied off, covered 3/4 of the way with head cement and rolled in sand and left to dry. That sounds pretty simple to me. But I have never tried it. Maybe I will while I am trying to cure my (*&^%$## CABIN FEVER!
     
  2. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    Sheep creek caddis, from the photo.
    Body- brown chenille (possibly two tone variety)
    Legs- brown hackle
    Antennae- mallard flank, woodduck, or teal (any/all would work)
    Pretty easy tie. Fish deep, these critters will be found on the bottom. May want to weight your fly during construction.
     
  3. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    http://stevenojai.tripod.com/sheepcrk.htm

    Hook: 1-2xl nymph or scud sz 8-12
    Hackle: brown, orange, or rust, 2-3 turns
    Body: dark olive chenille, small for sz 10-12 and medium for bigger (could also try peacock herl or sparkle chenille)
    Wing: mallard flank

    I've had the most success using the "original" colors of brown hackle, dark olive body and natural gray/white wing. Lots of room to experiment, though. I typically hang 'em under an indicator as a trailer behind a weighted leech or chironomid and fish around weed beds and dropoffs. I've also caught fish stripping them near the bottom 6-12' deep. Other folks have had good success tying them on a scud hook and fishing them off a floater with a long leader in very shallow water when fish are rooting around for scuds.
     
  4. Chef

    Chef New Member

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    thanks. I like the fly. I like the hackle at the back.
     
  5. BFK

    BFK Member

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    A must have for my box for lowland lakes are the Offut Lake Special, the Pink Lady Bucktail, and the Pink Lady Nymph. They represent three life stages of a midge that seems to hatch late April through early May. Having said that, I've never seen midges with that color, but they do work well.

    The Offut Lake Special and Pink Lady Bucktail were patterns given to me by Rufus Kiser (or Kyzer), an old time tyer and teacher 40 years ago. The Pink Lady Nymph was listed in one of the past editions of the Flies of The Northwest by the IEFFC, and it was responsible for landing the largest native rainbow I've hooked in a westside lake on a fly.
     
  6. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    According to my copy of the Inland Empire Fly Fishing Club's publication of 1981, captioned FLIES OF THE NORTHWEST, page 32 shows the fly.
    Pink Lady Nymph
    Hook 12 1x long
    Tail 15-30 stands gray bucktail
    Trim head.
    Body, pink floss
    Originated by Jim Pautzke, Sumner
    For coastal lowland lakes. Used for an emerging pupa of large red bodied chironomid.

    I have no way to post the picture.
     
  7. BFK

    BFK Member

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    I can probably post pix tomorrow, assuming I get some work done today--and figure out how to post photos. The three flies aren't what the names would lead you to think. The Offut Lake Special is not the one Keith Hixson posted some time ago in another thread, and the bucktail isn't a streamer type but rather a wet fly with a sparse deer hair wing. It bears a resemblance to a Black Pennel except for the wing and body color. The nymph is that one from the IEFFC, and it's an excellent fly, IMO.
     
  8. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    From the picture in the book it looks to be a simple fly to tie and to fish. Sometimes simple = success. I was once fishing in an local lake with a fellow that had just bought a new fly rod and reel and line and leader and fly that day. He had never been fishing with a fly rod before. The fellow in the store sold him a carrot nymph and told him to go troll it in the lake. He knocked them dead. I happen to forget my sinking line and all I had was a floating line. I did not do as well. Really didn't do as well.
     
  9. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    TP, Thanks for providing the link on the original sheep creek special. The red and the yellow versions probably make great high country patterns. I'm gonna tie some up and try them out next summer in the Alpines.
     
  10. wet line

    wet line New Member

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    And I bet you thought this would be a simple question Chef! So far about 50 different flies have been listed and then add size and color variations it probably pushes conservatively more than 100 different flies. Considering you probably want at least 3 or 4 of each in your boxes you have a lot or tying to do in the next few months.

    Your local shop is going to welcome your business.

    Dave
     
  11. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    Why does it sound like fly fishing is complicated. Most flies that are out there will work in both still water and skinny water. Even Chronomids will work in Skinny water. If they are small enough that is. Zebra nymphs come to mind.
     
  12. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    Jim, you're correct about many of the fly designs crossing over.
    It's not flyfishing that's complicated, it's flyfisherman.
     
  13. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Yeah, but that is what makes it so interesting.
    Some great people are flyfishers. I have met quite a few.

    But you have to admit that the OLIVE BUGGER is one of the
    best flies around. LOL

    Chef, put a few in your fly box with a selection of sizes.
    Maybe a few black buggers and of course, the brown bugger.

    That alone, should fill a small fly box.
     
  14. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    So true. I've branched out into a lot of fun styles of flies but I still put a lot of fish in the net with olive buggers.
     
  15. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    My 5 year old daugher put an 18" trout in the net with an olive bugger. She still talks about that trip often and knows when the weather is nice she wants to head out again. Her 7 year old sister was jealous about staying home for that trip.
     
  16. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    My personal preference for lake fishing is
    Parachute Adams for a dry.
    Wooly bugger for a wet fly
    I plan to try some scuds this summer
    and some chronnies. I have never fished either.
    Shame on me.

    My fishing partner and myself tie and fish what he calls a brown bomber.
    It is a red glass bead head, brown body with brown palmer hackle and a brown marabou tail
    Ugly thang. I think it scares the fish into jumping into the net.
     
  17. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    I've had my best luck trolling on lakes with a Yellow Bugger. Plus this will also work in Skinny water.
     
  18. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    One of my problems is that I have so many fly boxes filled with flys that I sometimes don't know what I have. I have tried to seperate them out by putting all of one type in one box and all of a different type in another etc. I usually wind up looking for one and I can't find it.

    I think I will limit my selection to a few flies that have worked in the past and when I get to the water, I
    left that one bug, that would make all of the difference, at home.

    I thought that I could separate them all out by bug but that just adds to the number of fly boxes I need and I can't find anything now. I usually take one or two boxes with flies that I think I will need and fish them. When I get to the lake or river, I will mostly fish one or two flies and that is it.

    Maybe my old brain is just jello. Anybody got a good system that works for them. I really don't need
    to carry seven fly boxes with me.
     
  19. BFK

    BFK Member

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    I've got the same problem-- too many flies (so why am I tying more?) in too many boxes. However, as part of my resolution to do more lake fishing this year, I'm working hard on it. My current thought is to build a large box, or a series of large boxes, in the fashion of the bvig ones they use in the UK. I figure that if I can put all lake flies in one or two big boxes, saltwater stuff in another, then I'll be in good shape.

    That's my theory, anyway. I'm also trying to condense my fly tying supplies, but that's another big issue. Don't know how to handle that at all.
     
  20. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Now the trick would be to get the bugs to comply. All of the bug=fly combinations in one box would only be permitted to live in a lake environment, and all of the bug=fly combinations in another box for river drifts.

    You know that just might work. Now if I could only get the bugs to cooperate.
    They would have to control their color and size too.
     

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