Fly-Fishing Terms, December Story

Discussion in 'Arts and Literature' started by GAT, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Fly-Fishing Terms
    by Gene Trump

    There seems to be some confusion over the meaning of certain fly angling terms. It would seem now is a good time to set the record straight. For those who have trouble comprehending complex fly-fishing jargon the following definitions should clear up most of the misunderstandings. You may wish to keep a copy of this list in your vest for future reference.

    Fly-Fishing: A sport that originated in the attempts to catch mayflies with very small bait on very small tackle. Unfortunately, the strikes were almost impossible to detect. Roy L. Coachman revolutionized the sport when he was attempting to release a Pale Morning Dun he just caught and a large rainbow (see "Large Fish") attacked the fly and hooked itself on the tackle. With a little fur and feathers Roy discovered he could catch fish instead of mayflies and the sport has never been the same since.

    Fly Rod: A device something like a lightning rod. When waved in the air it attracts all sorts of fly
    insects -- particularly mosquitos and yellowjackets.

    Line: An explanation made by a fly-fisher.

    Reel: The activity you frantically partake in when you notice a large black dog swimming across your drift.

    Mending the Line: The splicing of your fly line after failing to reel fast enough to avoid hooking the large black dog.

    Turning over of the Line: Returning the spliced fly line you had borrowed from your fishing buddy (see "Fishing Buddy", past tense).

    Fishing Buddy: This person is a genuine wonder. You wonder where he is. You wonder if he can swim. You wonder how you are going to get home because he has the keys to the truck.

    Snake Guide: A guide on the Deschutes River in Oregon.

    Cast: A plastic device worn on the arm after attempting to avoid the snake the Deschutes Guide helped you find.

    Reel Seat: As opposed to a Bogus Seat, this is the part of your body you were attempting to protect from the Deschutes snake.

    False Cast: Very common around lounge areas of ski resorts.

    Roll Cast: Worn by Pop 'N Fresh due to being whacked on the kitchen counter once too often.

    Back Cast: Not to be confused with the above. In this activity you attempt to snag the foliage directly behind you while fly-fishing.

    Large Fish: Any fish caught by an angler. Not relative to the actual size.

    Perfect Cast: Ignore this term. It doesn't exist.

    Buggy Whipping: The attempt to remove the artificial fly from the end of the tippet by whipping it off.

    Waders: Large, rubber overalls (illegal in some states) used for holding water.

    Drying Patch: A spot of ground you go to when you wish to remove the Waders.

    Tying Vise: Not as bad as tobacco or alcohol but just as expensive.

    Whip Finisher: Buggy Whipping off your last parachute Adams when the trout will take nothing else.

    Wind Knots: A strict rule imposed by the co-inhabitants of a tent whereby the consumption of chili is absolutely forbidden.

    Fly: What you were attempting to do when you acquired the Cast while protecting your Reel Seat from the now famous Deschutes snake.
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