Fly lines in different climates.

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by lx-88, Oct 20, 2011.

  1. lx-88

    lx-88 Member

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    I know that lines are designed for specific temperature ranges and could become stiff or limp when taken out of that range. I also know that sun block kills lines. The question is if I'm going to do permanent damage to my Rio Switch line by fishing it in hot salt water when I go to Florida this winter to see family. I don't want to buy a new line for a short one week trip and maybe only a day on the water. Obviously I'll clean my gear, including the line.
     
  2. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

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    Before there were fly lines created specifically for tropical fishing, anglers used the same ole fly lines used in the temperate climates. I used a Cortland 444 peach line on my first tropical flats fishing trip with no problems and have used it subsequently here, Montana, and Alaska. I think a major advantage of the tropical finish lines is that they don't lose their body when laying on the deck of a flats boat when you're casting from the deck and stripping in line. If you're wading, then that issue goes away.

    Sg
     
  3. lx-88

    lx-88 Member

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    Thanks Salmo, that's what I figured but it's nice to hear someone concur with it.
     

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