Flyfishing from shore for SRC's

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Lucid Dreams of Fish, May 21, 2005.

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How do you flyfish for src's, from the shore

Cast straight out form the beach. 5 vote(s) 11.9%
Cast strictly parallel to the beach. 0 vote(s) 0.0%
Cast both parallel to beach and 45 degres away. 22 vote(s) 52.4%
Cast at directions at a complet random. 15 vote(s) 35.7%
  1. Lucid Dreams of Fish Member

    Posts: 44
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I just got into flyfishing last summer and love it. I mostly fished rivers and lakes, but some people told me to try sea run cutthroats. I finnally did it :thumb: On the first time, I would cast away from the shore. And they will always striked near rod tip, about 10' away. When I gave my fishing report to the fly shop, they sugested, to cast parallel of the shore, and about 45degres out. I now find that I catch a lot more this way and with more line out.
    How many you fish this way, for src's? And wich way do get more trout, and which way is the bigger guys coming from.
  2. wet line New Member

    Posts: 2,313
    Burien, WA, King.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Fishing for cutts from shore I will admit there are many others far more adept than I.

    However I have an idea or two. When casting streamer type things, say a Clouser, I will cast along the shore line pretty much as described either with or against the current and us a fast retrieve. When fishing something like a shrimp pattern or a clam worm type thing I will cast across and down current and let my fly swing with the tide.

    I think Puget Sound Fly Co. is having a beach fishing class coming up very soon. It may be worth a phone call.

    Dave
  3. miyawaki Active Member

    Posts: 3,164
    Kent, Washington, USA.
    Ratings: +732 / 1
    I always wade to my knees and make a first cast downtide within a foot of the waters edge. If that is nine o'clock, then my next casts are at ten and eleven o'clock. I rarely catch any searuns straight out at twelve. I save those casts for coho. I've also noted that some of my largest searuns have come on my closest casts to the beach.

    Leland.
  4. Preston Active Member

    Posts: 2,405
    .
    Ratings: +356 / 0
    Anyone who has fished for sea-run cutthroat from a boat should be familiar with the old dictum "be sure you can see the bottom". Casting from a boat toward the shore or trolling parallel and close to the shore has, from the earliest days of the fishery, been one of the most productive methods. Cutthroat can often be found feeding right at the water's edge. It stands to reason that, when casting from the beach, casting parallel or up to a 45-degree angle to the shore should allow you to cover the best water.
  5. D3Smartie Active Member

    Posts: 1,987
    WA
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    I rarely wade into the water when i am fishing from shore unless i am trying to reach a particular spot. Then i fan my casts out and try to cover the water from about 5 to 10 feet deep. I think this is about the depth that most of te bigger cutties hang out at, although sometime I find them deeper.
    When fishing from my boat i cast right to the shoreline and often will pick up fish with in the first few strips in only a couple feet of water.
  6. fish-on Waters haunt me....

    Posts: 271
    camano island
    Ratings: +29 / 0
    I second D3Smartie,

    I rarely even set foot on the water. The fish I catch are normally in the last 10 feet of my retrieve. I keep the same principle when fishing favorite holes in rivers. I always fish the closest water first.

    John