For all the Pass lake guys

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Daryle Holmstrom, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. PT

    PT Physhicist

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    Why the olive tie instead of a more natural brown? Just curious.
     
  2. JRSly

    JRSly Oncorhynchus clarki clarki

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    They are very opportunistic, I agree.

    I kind of agree.

    I agree, browns are dominantly piscivorous, so are cutthroat and larger rainbows.

    Dan, it isn’t that I disagree with you, I just agree for different reasons than you presented. All trout are opportunistic, but between rainbows, cutthroat and browns, rainbows are the most. The morphology of a fish can tell a lot, and I bring this up because it is useful when looking at what fish eat. Look at the difference between relative mouth size of our rainbows, cutthroat and brown trout. They will be in increasing size in that order. It all comes down to prey type and availability. A large rainbow, and in some cases even browns aren’t going to go in search for small trout/sculpin/crayfish if there is a bunch of aquatic insects available with minimum effort. Why waste the energy searching, and chasing a larger prey if you can get a larger net gain in energy by eating something else. Yes, the best food for fish is fish, so if it is available they will munch on fish, but there are a lot of factors working together here. Larger fish eat a lot of sculpins (and crayfish when available) because that is the easiest to catch and the most dominant prey, with the greatest net gain in energy. It is a lot easier to catch a sculpin than it is a trout. If you see a sculpin in a stream you can often just bend over and pick it up with a little practice (I have done a lot of field work with sculpins), this is a lot harder to do with little trout.

    Sly
     
  3. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    Yes but think about how many more bows are caught on chiros than browns, and then how many browns you catch on baitfish/crawfish patterns. Also you have to remember that fish in lakes cruise, so they have to move anyway. After fishing rivers in montana I know that certain fish will not eat nymphs and that some fish will only be caught with streamers. For instance, on the upper madison around three dollar bridge where it is a 75/25 rainbow to brown ration, but when I streamer fish it I almost never catch rainbows, maybe 1 for every 15 browns. The rainbows you do catch are often large, and they have lots of teeth look more aggressive than you average rainbow. Big trout have little problem catching baitfish, as they have a bass like suction system that inhales what ever they want to a certain extent. All rivers are different though, and one river can have fish with total different feeding habits than a river just one valley over.
     
  4. JRSly

    JRSly Oncorhynchus clarki clarki

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    Dan, I don't think you read my whole post, either that or you just don't understand. Just now you basically said the same thing I did in the post before, please re-read it before you disagree with what I have to say. I wasn't disagreeing with you, I was just pointing out that "large rainbow, and in some cases even browns aren’t going to go in search for small trout/sculpin/crayfish if there is a bunch of aquatic insects available with minimum effort." Now if a prey of fish is easily caught and available larger trout (browns, cutthroat and rainbows), like I pointed out in the earlier post (and you did in yours with the example on the upper Madison) will choose that because like I said before "the best food for fish is fish, so if it is available they will munch on fish." Again, I am just repeating what I already said, so please re-read my earlier post. You are just restating what I just said in different words.

    Also, if you are agreeing now that rainbows will eat aquatic insects, then why did you argue with cascadekiller earlier? Yes the diet of larger browns and cutthroat might be more fish based, but he didn’t say he was talking about them, for all you know he could have been talking about normal rainbows. The fact is that trout are opportunistic. Browns and cutthroat tend to be more piscivorous, but if there isn’t fish around they will eat aquatic insects, even your upper Madison browns would if there wasn’t any baby fish.

    Sly
     
  5. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    No doubt, I understand you fully, and I didnt really disagree with you. I was just adding on for the most part...
     
  6. Islander

    Islander Steve

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    Crayfish change color depending upon their surroundings. In clear water situations, you should try to match the color of the bottom. Grey, brown and olive are common. In darker water, black, dark green and dark brown are more likely to work. The crayfish underbelly cannot be altered by it's surroundings. Often the bellies are white or orange in color. I have some tied in several colors and fish what works at the time. Something I carried over from all those years buzzing around the Delta in my Ranger 373 ripping the lips off bass. That and "catch and release". :beer2:
     
  7. Mingo

    Mingo the Menehune stole my beer

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    No kidding.............here's my uncle "Barnacle Bill" Bocephus with a beauty from Pass taken several years ago, plus another shot of the same critter trying to steal his boat. They're sneaky............beware!!!!!!






    :clown:
     
  8. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast Active Member

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    Well, this thread got my attention. With the rivers blown out and my new 'toon looking me in the eye, I tied up a bunch of crawdad patterns based loosely on some I found in a catalog. It's been a few years since I've fished Pass, but I will be there soon.
     
  9. Chet L

    Chet L New Member

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    Crawfish, Mud Bugs,, whatever, Coat them thoroughly with Old Bay Seasoning, steam them over beer, serve them with a tub of ice filed with Deschutes Brewery 'Mirror Pond'. Fabulous
     

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