Furling chenille?

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by ZugBug, Jan 19, 2004.

  1. ZugBug Member

    Posts: 213
    Castle Rock, Colorado
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Tight Loops- You got some splainin' to do.

    Let's see some pics of your work Bob was raving about eh? Maybe a quick tutorial?

    Thanks,
    ZB
  2. Surf_Candy Member

    Posts: 804
    Bainbridge Island, WA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    sounds like a pattern Greg uses for SRC's and resident coho - ask Greg for his chartreuse worm pattern...

    Surf
  3. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    I can't spend a lot of time with it right now. But for the idea, imagine doing this with a 4" piece of chinelle on a small 3407/34007 hook, say an 8 or so:

    http://www.angelfire.com/wa/salmonid/articulation.html

    I like Glimmer chinelle, as it has a dyed core. The pattern Bob is raving about was Pink Glimmer for a furled tail and body, with a rust Krystal Flash wing, and a red GP rump feather for the collar.

    I use tungsten beads to give a black eye, and to get a good sink.
  4. Greg Member

    Posts: 316
    Gig Harbor, WA, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    Tightloops,

    When you get the chance please post a photo or scan of your fly; very interested in seeing the results of this technique as you've applied it.

    I remain a bit confused, however. In the "Fabulous Fly" thread Bob Lawless said "...He described how he made the body which eluded me, but I could see clearly each of the bones and spine in that little bait fish..." In your reply you said "...Simply, I call it The Cutthroat Worm, as I designed it for cutts in the salt." Is it a worm or a baitfish pattern? Are you two talking about the same fly?

    My guess is you tied a Polychaete pattern representative of Phylodocid (e.g. genus Hemipodus or Nereis) which have numerous well developed legs which may have been mistaken by him as being "bones and spine." The give away is when you said it could be tied as a "...pink worm for steelhead."

    The fly that I tie and that Surf Candy referred to above is representative of a tube worm with a lot of longish tentacles (Thelepus) that is found in the South Sound and Hood Canal. This particular worm will leave its tube when disturbed and become available as a snack to fish cruising in the area. It may be the same Polychaete that Kerr's "Jim Dandy" (aka "Snot Dart") was patterned after though I have no way of knowing that.

    Greg

    Greg
  5. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    Actually it does not look like Thelepus at all.

    The body is unique as the glimmer allows for a spine and some "flesh" around it. Its not imitative, but suggestive of worms and bait fish.

    And I will shoot some shots tonight. Including a series on furling chenille. Its not hard.

    Rob
  6. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    There is a series of images about furling in my member gallery, and one shot of the furling around I have done. The black leech was the first, the Pink Worm was second, and the cutthroat flies and minnows were third.

    I am still trying to figure out how to make a decent minnow. It needs a tail, but I am having trouble getting Krystal flash or flashabou to stay in the furl. Any thoughts I would love to hear, and I would love to see what you guys do with furled chenille.

    Chris needs to approve them, so be patient with the guy.

    Rob
  7. ZugBug Member

    Posts: 213
    Castle Rock, Colorado
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Rob- Thanks for sharing. Those look great! I am going to putter around with this technique.

    ZB
  8. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    Please do, and see what you come up with. I think its a great fly, because of how it moves in the water.

    One thing, I noticed last night that the chenille shrinks when it dries out, creating a stiff fly. I am hoping that it will soften up when it hits the water again.

    Rob
  9. Greg Member

    Posts: 316
    Gig Harbor, WA, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    Very, very nice! Could be very productive for SRC in the right colors. Have you experienced much success in the salt with it yet?

    Suggestion for keeping Krystal Flash in the furl (braid): dip your fingers into Softex and then run the Krystal Flash through them coating with a light application before tying into the furl. Since the Softex contains Toluene, you may want to put a latex glove on that hand first and thoroughly wash if it gets on your skin; or not if you've been around enough chemistry in your life not to care. A thin coat of Softex applied in this manner shouldn't affect action, may provide a slight "dulling" of translucency because of opaqueness but it should provide sufficient adherence to prevent it from slipping out.

    Nice! Thanks for sharing it.
  10. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    Let's Talk toluene....

    Latex gloves are nothing to toluene, you need something real, like Nytril gloves to keep the stuff out of your body. Nytril gloves are made in a grade for lab use that look like purple latex gloves. Nytril is cool in that only 3 known solvents can penetrate them.

    I used to work on Hazardous Waste clean up, but I don't any longer, I still however deal with the same lab, so I am lucky to get a supply for work free of charge.

    The nearest stuff I have found for home use are called "solvent gloves" and look like industrial strength dish gloves.

    Now saying this, I really like to use Veniard's Cellire Varnish for head cement, and that has plenty of toluene in it, so I rot my brain out anyway....

    Rob
  11. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    I have only fished it once in the salt, last weekend, and its the one in the upper left that got the strike. Oh, and I tied it last weekend for the first time.

    I have tried the pink worm, and the black leech for steelhead, but lets not talk numbers, as I can't seem to hook a winter steelie for anything.
  12. Greg Member

    Posts: 316
    Gig Harbor, WA, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    Let's Talk toluene....

    So, you're saying you need an Organovapor respirator when you tie?
  13. rockfish Member

    Posts: 730
    Manchester, Wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    wheres a picture of the fly? cant find it in the gallery




    catch and release wild sculpins
  14. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
  15. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    Let's Talk toluene....

    Well, if one wants to be completely safe. Heck, at least its not benzene....

    Rob
  16. rockfish Member

    Posts: 730
    Manchester, Wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    chartruese or white or yellow would be great src patterns, those are great lookin flies, I bet the flounders would eat them up.


    catch and release wild sculpins
  17. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    So then do them up, and tell us how they fish!

    And what is this sig: "catch and release wild sculpins" you striking out on the targeted species, or are you slumming these days?
  18. rockfish Member

    Posts: 730
    Manchester, Wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I'm always slummin, and I was trying to put humor in it. everybody loves it when you've been casting for hours with nuthin to show for it and then set the hook into a big bullhead, then I gently release the bullhead and say to myself "aw ya whats up now"



    catch and release wild sculpins:beer1