generic emerger pattern

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Randy Knapp, Jun 26, 2003.

  1. Randy Knapp Active Member

    Posts: 1,132
    Warm Springs, Virginia, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I need a "go to" emerger pattern to use as a dropper off a dry fly. I would like to have a size 20 or 18 simple to tie pattern that works more often then not. I am not looking for a specific match the hatch type fly but one that generally works most of the time.

    Randy
  2. mat1226 Active Member

    Posts: 409
    Bellingham, WA.
    Ratings: +28 / 0
    I highly recommend the deer hair emerger posted here earlier by ceviche. Month and a half ago or so.

    www.flyfishing-and-flytying.co.uk/patterns/dh_emerger.html

    I have not figured out how to post a link on this site but since seeing this pattern and using it I have fallen in love with its overall effectiveness.

    Don't know if it will fit the bill for a dropper off a dry as I like to tie it so it floats on its own.

    Here is a neat little suggestion to anyone who reads this, tie it with what I call the LaFontaine variation, orange deer hair, killer.

    Mark
  3. Mike Etgen Not Quite A Luddite, But Can See One From Here

    Posts: 1,433
    Port Orchard, Washington, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    RiverFishing

    I'll have to cast my vote with the above mentioned fly (deer hair emerger), too...have tied and used it with more than satisfactory results, and it's reasonably easy to tie, too.
    When I have used it as the floating fly for a dropper rig my strikes have been on the nymph, though...

    Mike
  4. hikepat Patrick

    Posts: 1,804
    Des Moines, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +12 / 0
    I have tied up a emerger very much like the one shown with the exeption that instead of a deer hair wing I tie a parachute wing then after its all tied in good force the hackle upward and wrap the hackle at the base to force it up so that it stands up like the deer hair, I then put in a little head cement to keep the hackle up and make the fly stronger. The results are almost alike. One bonus with this way of tying is I can make the post a high vis so my eyes can see on the water better.
  5. crockett New Member

    Posts: 184
    Kirkland, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I prefer the sparkle dun over all other floating emergers...the trailing shuck of rust sparkle yarn is key. For a wet fly, I like a soft hackle...in yellow or orange. Both are easy ties.

    -Crock
  6. sanjuanmaster1 Guest

    Posts: 0
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    A K.F. FLASHER IN EITHER BLACK, BROWN OR RED WORKS REALLY WELL. IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT A K.F. FLASHER IS, IT'S A THREAD BODY OF THE COLORS MENTIONED A FINE GOLD WIRE RIBBING, A COUPLE STRANDS OF RAINBOW CRYSTAL FLASH TRIMMED SHORT, RIGHT BEHIND THE HEAD, AND A BLACK DUBBING HEAD. GREAT PATTERN
  7. Randy Knapp Active Member

    Posts: 1,132
    Warm Springs, Virginia, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Thanks, guys. Just what I needed.

    Randy


    " When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee" Isaiah 43:2
  8. Nooksack Mac Active Member

    Posts: 1,947
    Bellingham, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +109 / 0
    About 12 years ago I designed a simple, all-purpose emerger that I call the Deerhair Emerging Whatever. Instead of a bug "struggling with its tights," I visualize someone struggling with a pullover sweater: during the moments when the sweater covers and engulfs the wearer's head and arms, the wearer looks like everyone, but nobody in particular. Anyway, that's the concept. This fly has performed in many situations, when insects of all major orders were emerging.
    On a light-wire hook, tie in a shuck consisting of those dun-colored soft fibers that grow at the base of many of the feathers we fly-tiers use; slightly less than shank length. Next, dub a body: your choice of color and texture. Then stack a slim bundle of deer hair. Tie it in about 1/4 shank length behind the eye (just in front of the body), tips forward, ca. one shank length protruding. Divide the tips, pull each half out to the side, 90 degrees from the shank; figure-eight them into place. Now take the deerhair that's to the rear, and make a hump (it's easier to wrap the bundle forward over your bodkin or scissor points). Tie down the deer hair behind the eye and trim the excess. You can add head-dubbing for larger hooks.
    This fly is easier and faster to tie than it was to write the above description. It may not be better than the above Klinkhamer variation, which I'm now eager to try, but it ably serves my needs for an all-purpose emerger.
  9. pintsize New Member

    Posts: 15
    UK.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Randy

    In the UK we use a "Buzzer" suspended off a dry fly, in the US I believe you call them midge.

    Take a look at

    http://www.diptera.co.uk/patterns/flies_b.htm

    There are quite a few pattterns that are very effective over here especially the ice buzzer and the black / gold buzzer.

    Cheers
    Pint
    :thumb
  10. Randy Knapp Active Member

    Posts: 1,132
    Warm Springs, Virginia, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    What a great site! Thanks bunches.

    Randy