Greener Day's

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by freestoneangler, Apr 20, 2014.

  1. My wife and I decided to take a drive up Green River Valley Rd this morning and let Ruby (our 8 month old yellow lab) stretch her legs and take a swim. The Green is my home river since we moved to WA in 1986. I'm guessing I've driven that road a few hundred times getting to/from our prime fishing access sites; Flaming Geyser Park, Whitney Bridge, Metzler's, Pumpkin Patch, O' Grady's, Nealey Bridge and the like. My long time fishing friend use to swing by and p/u darn near every weekend during the winter and summer seasons.

    Stopping at Hwy 18, we noted the river was flowing at a good clip and had a nice off-green color to it...almost Hoh like. The first changed we noted was that the Green River Valley Meat Market has been repainted a grass green color -- which seems appropriate enough. They were closed today, saving me from buying a bag of their to die for smoked beef jerky. Along the way, I kept pointing out where our old access sites were. With the exception of Metzler state access site, all now with No Trespassing signs and locked or eliminated gates. I recalled the cold, damp frosty morning's; walking in at dark so we could get to some of the sections before the boats made their way down from Whitney. I also remember a healthy fishery where it was a better than 50/50 chance you would have a fish or two on the rod any given day. Of course that was not fly-fishing and way before the long rods became the rage. Mostly just corkie's and scented yarn.

    After Ruby's inaugural Green River splash and a decent hike, we headed back. Along the way I couldn't help but recall all the great days fishing this river... and some sadness about how hard the fishery has fallen. Having been involved with TU, WDFW and Muckleshoot efforts to help the fishery; involving the wild capture brood stock, wild capture & release above HH, and running the rearing ponds in the park itself (we named it Dick Brice memorial ponds in recognition of our friends efforts to make a fishery better....and whose life was cut way too short), it is a bit deflating. One year of "good numbers data", getting hopes high, would subsequently be quenched by startling, scratch your head results. Did we do the right thing? Should we have left them completely alone? Why couldn't we get the tribe to agree to revised net schedules? Was our fate sealed by ocean conditions and factors unknown to us and way out of our control? At the time, those "in the know" seem to believe it was the right approach.

    The Green still has a fishery and, considering its location in Puget Sound, that is amazing in itself. But, I recall Greener Day's and only wish the efforts we made, like those who preceded us, could have turned things around. Mostly I wish these fish had no commercial value... man would that ever change things! Oh well, nothing wrong with wishful dreaming.
     
    Tyler Sadowski and Rob Hardman like this.

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