home made stripping basket idea share

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Ben Guss, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. Ben Guss

    Ben Guss Member

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    Hi all,

    So after my latest home made/diy stripping basket broke due to transverse my local beach like a monkey, I’m back to the drawing board on building another stripping basket.
    I’ve found the following link which is not bad:

    But I thought I’d check with you all to see what has been the successful tips.

    I’m also interested in how people are drilling/ cutting the plastic in a fashion that is not so prone to cracking.

    Thanks for the help!
    Ben
     
  2. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Softer plastics (like the Rubbermaid dishpan) are not so likely to crack. I make a webbing belt and thread it though three "belt loops", one on either side and one in the front. I drill holes at the top and bottom of these slots I cut for the webbing belt which reduces the likelihood of the slot tearing or cracking. My homemade stripping basket is probably over ten years old with no apparent problems.
     
  3. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    Great ideas all. If you plan on beach fishing this year or in future years and don't want to pay and arm and a leg for a basket, I'd try one of these designs. It's always a good idea to ahve one for salt water applications.
     
  4. Jordan Simpson

    Jordan Simpson Active Member

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    I usually get baskets that are pre-holed along the sides or even all on the bottoms, such as this one:

    If you can find a basket that has a perforated bottom, get some zap-straps/zip-ties, and just use those for the pegs/line organizers.
     
  5. Ben Guss

    Ben Guss Member

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    Good ideas!

    Any more?

    thanks!
     
  6. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Call Peninsula Outfitters and get a LinKurv stripping basket! Homemade ones have been okay, but I really like the shape, fit and finish of this one.
     
  7. Spey Dog

    Spey Dog New Member

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    I got so tired of trying keep them getting busted so ended up paying the arm and leg for the orvis tub. Know that it was well spent money after 2 years of hard use.
     
  8. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

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    I used plastic corn-on-the-cob holders for the pegs. I tried cable ties, and the line would sometimes hang up in them.

    Tom
     
  9. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    I've used an Orvis basket for about six years now. The only casualty was the buckle when I shut it in the door of my truck. Dumb Ass! a quick trip to JoAnn Fabrics , five minutes on a sewing machine and I was back in business. But, I think I''l make a couple of these up for my nephews to have for the summer beach fishing. I'm not quite ready to invest in the Orvis baskets for them as yet.
     
  10. Josh Smestad

    Josh Smestad aka Mtnwkr

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  11. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    That is awesome. Rubber non skid grips for the stool make for good rod protection when you rest it for unhooking all the SRC and Resident Coho that will be caught. Those plugs in the bottom look like blue non retractable Bic ball point pen caps, awesome!
     
  12. Loren Jensen

    Loren Jensen Active Member

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    made mine out of a plastic detergent bucket. i like it a lot. key to not splitting is to run high rpm and little pressure. i used a jigsaw to cut the face of it out, and a knife to smooth the edges. worked like a charm. took me all of 15 minutes and no money.
     
  13. Spey Dog

    Spey Dog New Member

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    I like Ikea Step stool! pretty cool. Have to keep an eye for one.
     
  14. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    I stopped at the Tacoma Narrows the other day and looked at a guy's basket while he was rigging up. He used very large electrical wire nuts for the pegs. Good idea. I stopped and looked at them at Home Depot. They are $16 for a pack of 10 or they come in packs of two. I think I might throw one together.
     
  15. Tony

    Tony Left handed Gemini.

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    josh you dog I bought one of those last summer at ikea with the same sort of idea in mind I really liked the curve, nice job
     
  16. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Your Preferred Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide

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    Simple Rubbermaid Dishpan; I drill a hole 3/8" diameter about 1 inch below and at the ends of each upper corner lip (This gives you a hole at each corner at the top face of the long sides.) I then heat up an old (3/8" shank diameter) Phillips Head screwdriver and then work the hot tool shank gently, briefly into the drilled holes, so as to create a melted lip of plastic around the edges of the pre drilled holes. This way the holes are less likely to ever tear. Then I use a 30" bungee cord with plastic coated hooks. Hook into one corner, bring around your back, hook into other corner, go fishing. The holes should be such that the plastic coated bungee hooks can slip in and out easily and quickly with no clips or retainers added. The basket should be a little loose and sloppy, tipped down and forward, not tight. Simple. Cheap. And very effective.

    Why I dont use line seperators, drain holes etc; With the drain holes in the bottom I cant work on a fly reel in the dish pan and not lose a screw or small part, dirt and water drip out into the car or truck or travel bag. It takes less than one second to tip the pan flip the incidental water out. If you get a big enough wash of water into your basket that you would be endangered by the sudden weight then no drain hole size will be adequate initially. All you have to do is grab the basket and pull it toward yourself and the water will drain out fast. Big deal. Likewise the bungee cord will stretch and protect you from a sudden pull on the basket should you fall into surf or current. If you dont drill holes in the basket you can use it to transport your wet waders and boots anywhere- car, plane , bagge etc with no mess. (Nice to have a garbage bag along on trips too.) And best of all; if you are fishing on the flats somewhere, and you have a sandwich and thermos along, you can put all of that down there in your nice dry basket and have a little picnic table with no salt water wash popping up into the little holes in the basket and ruining your lunch. If you wade on the shallower Striped Bass flats at night on the east coast this means a lot at 2 in the morning as you may be a long walk from shore. And I find it helpful here too all of the time, for all kinds of little things, like splicing a line or just fussing with your flybox on a windy day. The plain,unadulterated Rubbermaid Dishpan is a marvel of simplicity and utility. Those little line seperators have a way of tangling lines as often as not. Once you learn how to handle line properly the tangle thing is not an issue, and if you dont then no amount of gimmicks or gizmos are going to resolve the problem. It helps to gently stretch one's line at the beginning and sometimes during the fishing day a few times too. When you are all done you can use the dishpan for storage between seasons, or you might even use it to wash your camp dishes. I bought tweo Rubbermaid dishpans for $5 at a Kmart about 15 years ago. I was going to go looking for a bungee cord when I found one alongside the road when I was on my way to the beach that night. I still have the baskets and the bungee cord.
     
  17. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

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    I agree with Bob that drain holes aren't really necessary. I much prefer fixed, hard pegs over flexible cable ties.

    From a functional standpoint, the best basket I ever made was about 24" deep. I never had line spilling over the top, and there were far fewer line tangles. The disadvantages were inconvenience associated with the size, and my wife said I looked like a beggar when I was wearing it. So I went back to a dishpan. I've heard that deep buckets or trash cans make great stripping baskets for fishing from a boat.

    I wear the basket as high on my stomach as possible. When I wear the basket lower, I get more tangles and the line doesn't shoot as well. You wouldn't think a few inches would make that much difference, but for me it does.

    Tom
     
  18. Kerfwappie

    Kerfwappie Member

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    Here are a couple of baskets I've built. The green ones are dollar store tote baskets and cost the least. I think I have maybe $4 into each. The basket's a buck... I'm not sure what I paid for the silicone baby bottle nipples, maybe $3. What I like about this model is it is very light, doesn't stick way out there like the dishpans do, and it drains fast. The only hang up is sometimes my fly line gets caught in the slot under the nipples. This could be resolved by making a washer to insert and help fill the slot in the nipple that holds it in the bottom of the basket. I just haven't taken the time yet to do this.

    The other basket is self explanatory. It also works great. I found this basket on the side of the road several years back and used it to carry tools in until I saw a picture of Bob Popovics using one as a stripping basket. Very good drainage and it pays out the line well, but it's out there.

    I use a wading belt but bungees work.

    Eric
     
  19. Ben Guss

    Ben Guss Member

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    Great info!
    Thanks for the help on this one!
     
  20. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    Just get the one from LL Bean for $13
     

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