How do you cook your steaks?

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by IveofIone, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. FLGator Member

    Posts: 646
    PNW
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Another option...instead of finishing/basting with butter try bacon grease. Have a bud who used to work at a local steak house and he said this was one of their "secrets".
  2. The Dude Member

    Posts: 59
    SW WA
    Ratings: +7 / 0
    Jerry, I am hungry now. How about cornmeal pancakes and sausage gravy ..........
  3. Jerry Daschofsky Moderator

    Posts: 7,814
    Graham, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +701 / 5
    Have made corn cakes quite a bit. Having family from Nebraska helps. LOL. But ate quite a few of them when we'd go back to the family farm there. Still make them, but they are an acquired taste for some.
  4. zeroforhire New Member

    Posts: 10
    Snohomish, WA
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  5. Mark Walker Active Member

    Posts: 2,775
    So. Cal.
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  6. Trapper Badovinac Author, Writer, Photographer

    Posts: 471
    Helena, Montana
    Ratings: +618 / 0
    I agree with his assessment that "grill marks" and "only flip once" shouldn't be hard and fast gospel truths.

    I end up grilling steaks on a grill that sits on my firepan. I keep one side of the pan hotter than the other side in order to get steaks from "rare" to "medium-rare" and to have a place to "rest" them after they are done, but I want to keep them warm. (I REALLY can't get myself to grill a good ribeye to "well done" or even "medium well". )

    The grill marks are great for photos:

    [IMG]

    but I too think the best results come without the marks.

    I use tongs and not a fork to flip them, but I do flip fairly often because I have to move the steaks around to get 12 steaks all done right and at the same time.

    So, mine now come out looking like this:

    [IMG]

    No grill marks, but really good taste.

    Trapper
  7. jersey livin' the dream

    Posts: 237
    sonoma county
    Ratings: +74 / 0
    tried something new this summer, just a simple S&P, powdered garlic and onion rub, very light. Grill as usual, but placed the meat in the "marinade" while resting in a plate.

    The marinades were pretty acidic; strong vinegars and lemon zest, but they really turned out well. It was a nice change. Once done resting, added olive oil, some honey and other goodies to the marinade whipped into a simple salad dressing and its hammer time.
  8. Jerry Daschofsky Moderator

    Posts: 7,814
    Graham, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +701 / 5
    I agree, have a VERY hard time serving a ribeye well done. Luckily for me, I smoke most of mine and the end pieces usually are bit more "well" to "medium well". So save those off to the side for the few who want a bit more well done steak.

    I need to pick up another fire pan. Should've bought the one off Butch after the demos a few years back. Nice to have them.
  9. tinman207 Active Member

    Posts: 187
    Ratings: +157 / 0
    Check out caveman style....placing the steak right on some blazing hot lump....it's awesome when done right. Lately I have been doing them super hot....placing the grill grate on top of the chimney charcoal starter, and when the coals are blasting, put the steak on and cook it above the chimney starter. It makes an outstanding sear with some char, but can leave the steak nice and rare.
  10. ImperialStoutRunsThruMe Member

    Posts: 79
    Central Oregon / Maupin, OR
    Ratings: +12 / 0
    If I'm cooking a steak on a campout for only myself, I do it different than when I'm cooking for 2 or more. I buy a nice 1" to 1 1/4" t-bone with plenty of marbling and fat. Season it with a little oil, salt, pepper, and garlic. Cook it over a medium wood fire on a grill and pour a little Bud or Tecate beer on it occasionally as it slowly cooks. When the fatty edges are done, it's done. The tricky part is not letting it cook too fast or too slow. Dunno how to explain it better than that - when it looks right to me, I take it off the fire, fix my baked potato, spoon some simmering ranch style beans onto my plate, and dig in.