Hybrid Chironomid Pupa

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Sinkline, Apr 7, 2014.

  1. Sinkline

    Sinkline Active Member

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    I've always admired the sleek design of the typical English Buzzer patterns. One thing about Buzzer patterns I've always wondered about was why tyers of those beautiful seemingly realistic designs stopped the abdomen short of the wing buds??? Typical Englich Buzzer design stops the abdomen short, and creates an extended thorax. The wing buds are carried along-side the thorax, and not the abdomen on Buzzer patterns. Of course, i am sure the fish could care less but still, the wing buds on a natural are carried along-side the segmented abdomen, not the thorax.

    I decided to tie some 'buds on a typical metal bead style Chironomid pupa pattern to see how it looked and was pretty happy with the appearance. The proportions of the fly are more in line with the proportions of natural pupa and the pattern can be tied to incorporate any, and all the features associated with either style of tie. What I tied here is just a very basic pattern just to show the buds incorporated into a metal bead pattern. The possibilities for realistic ties are endless!

    Again, I'm sure the fish could care less so long as size, color, and shape meet their taste, but it's still fun to mess around with pattern design changes.



    Randy


    Hook: TFS 2305 #12
    Gills: Uni Stretch, White
    Bead/Thorax: 7/64 Brass, Chrome/Black
    Abdomen: UTC 70, Brown
    Rib: UTC Wire, SM, Olive
    Wing Buds: Stillwater Solutions, Midge Stretch Flex, Summer Duck

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Irafly

    Irafly Active Member

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    It is funny how we will look at every aspect of a pattern and analyze it (how many wraps, color of thread, proportions) and yet we continue to avoid noticing that pesky sharp pointing thing hanging out of our patterns. If the fish cared that much about wing buds then I imagine the hook might throw them off a pit as well. But as for selling fisherman... I'm tying one up!
     
  3. Sinkline

    Sinkline Active Member

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    I hear ya Ira. I was at the vice yesterday tying one-off patterns, color combinations, etc. in hopes of hitting on something new that jumped out at me. I thought this was interesting and decide to share it. I'm too lazy to tie 'buds on my patterns when a rust brown thread collar under the bead serves the same purpose.

    I've caught fish under the bobber on a bare hook just to prove it would work. :)


    Randy

    This is my typical pattern.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    I once pointed out on a thread on a different website that we fly tiers are obsessed with small details of a pattern and yet, as Ira mentioned, the trout ignore the metal part of the pattern.

    Someone posted that there is an indication that fish look for a reason to eat a pattern, not a reason not to eat it.

    That makes sense. Why else would they ignore the hook eye, the cable (to them) tied to the hook eye, the metal hook bend and sharp point?

    We could try cutting off the hook bend and spear and fish it to see if we get more strikes then a pattern that includes the hook bend and spear but we'd still have the hook eye and cable attached at the head.

    It is possible with dry flies. I've heard of a fly tier who tied patterns on tooth picks and cut the wood section short so only the body, wing and hackle were presented to the trout. He wanted to see if it made a difference in the strikes. He claimed it did.

    Well, unless someone comes up with an invisible hook eye, bend and spear, we're kind'a stuck with using hooks so we can catch the fish.

    Fortunately, we are not dealing with rocket science brain surgeons and they do seem to ignore the deadly part of the pattern. Personally, I'd be a bit suspicious of a T-bone steak with a large hook sticking out of one side...


    405005351.jpg
     
    triploidjunkie likes this.
  5. Sinkline

    Sinkline Active Member

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    Gene you are so correct. Just last week my teen fishing friend and I were tubing super clear water where you can often see the fish headed toward your pattern and actually anticipate the strike. Brandon, took it a step farther and started hand-lining his leader over the edge of his tube while watching the fish react to the pattern. I was anchored very close and Brandon was sharing every detail with me. The fish would often swim right up to the pattern, stop, and just look at it. Then, they would swim away, turn, and rush the pattern and eat it! At one point during Brandon's experiment he lowered his blood worm down and a whitefish swam up to it instantly and stopped just looking at the fly. Brandon twitched the pattern and another, larger fish came like a streak from a ways away and slammed the fly while the original Great White just sat looking at the pattern! Greed??? Get to the food before the competition???


    Randy
     
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    One reason I use two patterns when fishing stillwaters is to give the impression of one critter chasing another one.

    Deke Meyer and I decided to call it the chase factor.

    One day while fishing for crappie, we were both using two WBs. One a light color and the other dark. We compared notes and found that the crappie were consistently taking the upper pattern. So, as an experiment, we switched patterns so the original lower pattern was tied in as the upper pattern. Again, the fish always took the upper pattern.

    Our theory was that the fish thought that the upper pattern must be worth eating because something was following it. So, the fish grabbed the upper pattern.

    Of course this doesn't always work and fish will take one specific pattern when you're using two different ones no matter if it is tied in as the upper fly or not. So our theory isn't worth crap.

    Still.... I normally use two patterns when fishing subsurface. If nothing else, it gives the fish a multiple choice :)
     

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