I want to start building rods...

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by Nick Riggs, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. Nick Riggs I've been known to fish from time to time...

    Posts: 482
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    I really want to start making my own rods, but I haven't a clue where to start. I can manage all the materials (thread, blanks, guides, etc...) but I really don't know where to start when it comes to equipment. I've seen pictures of rod wrapping tools (Roper's) and I can build one myself, but is there anything else that I need to get?
  2. Dylan D Member

    Posts: 323
    West Seattle
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    You'll hear this advice a lot - take a class. I did, and it speeds up the process immensely.
  3. Nick Riggs I've been known to fish from time to time...

    Posts: 482
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    Thanks, I never would have thought of that.
  4. Joshw Tamer of Trouts

    Posts: 432
    Bozeman, MT
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    All About the Fly in Monroe has rod building classes. I took one at the shop and had a great time, learned a lot of cool stuff and have now built 5 rods.

    Josh
  5. mike doughty Honorary Member

    Posts: 10,189
    the uinta's
    Ratings: +5 / 0
    i learned from a video tape and haven't had really any problems, except a couple minor ones, but nobodies perfect. if you're not sure what all to buy then just order a rod building kit. i order from cabelas a lot because they are reasonably priced and offer quite a bit. the kits come with a couple of different colr threads, winding checks, guides, hook keepers, reel seat, cork handle and a basic building chart. i can't remember if tip tops come with the kits or not though. they're pretty easy to build, but if i was starting now i would probably take some sort of class.
  6. Scott Behn Active Member

    Posts: 1,201
    Lk Stevens, Wa.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Take a class...

    :cool:
  7. James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

    Posts: 2,785
    Tacoma
    Ratings: +88 / 0
    Order of preference :

    1) Take a class

    2) Take a class

    3) Take a class

    4) Work with someone who's built a rod before

    5) Get a book

    6) Just start doing it

    I did a combo of 5 and 6, and I can tell you, that unless you are a pig headed son of a bitch, it's not worth it. So if you can't take a class, then try to find someone who can at least provide some guidance. The biggest problems you'll have; are fear of doing something wrong, and epoxy. Neither are as big as deal as you would think, and having someone re-iterate that to you while you make mistakes is *very* important.

    But in general the class will be FAR more valuable to you than getting good equipment. Save your pennies, wrap in a cardboard box with a thread bobbin, do anything to get to a class!

    Also, start with something cheap. I can guarantee that there is no way your first rod will be a thing of beauty (though the pride won't be any less!).

    If you need more info, please feel free to PM me.

    Finally, where the heck is Stanwood at?

    -- Cheers
    -- James
  8. Christian Brewer Super Slacker

    Posts: 354
    Slacking in Mill Creek
    Ratings: +17 / 0
    Stanwood is near Camano Island. You should give Greg's a visit in Lake Stevens. They are also great people and very helpful. I couldn't make it in during the times that he was giving his rod building classes, so he worked with me on my schedule.

    http://www.gregscustomrods.com/index.htm

    Christian
  9. Nick Riggs I've been known to fish from time to time...

    Posts: 482
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    I'm going to take a class as soon as possible, thanks for the advice.
  10. East Fork Active Member

    Posts: 1,200
    Vancouver, WA
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Even if you are going to take a class, think about buying a low end kit from say Cabela's and having some fun with it.
  11. martinrjensen BambooBoy

    Posts: 108
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I can't argue with a class, but I think this is one thing that you could do following instructions from a book. You really don't need much in tools but you do need some way to rotate the rod after you cover the wraps with epoxy. the real cheap way, the way I first started was to have a shoe box and I put it on the mantle and cut notches in it. When I put the epoxy on the wraps, (I put it on in one coat) I then turned on a movie (on TV, a DVD will work) and rotated the rod 180 degrees every few minutes. Of course I wouldn’t do this today, I would just put it in my homemade barbecue rotisserie motor but the fact remains I used this method successfully for a few years.
    martin