Initial oar setup

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by pwoens, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. pwoens

    pwoens Active Member

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    new boat, new oars....what are the steps to setup the distance on the oar stops, distance out, distance from one handle to the other, distance from your chest, ect...

    Jerry?? :clown:

    Im looking to have it somewhat close when I hit the water the first time. I know I will be making adjustments on the water but just curious if there is a process for getting it close on land (or my living room right now) before hitting the water?
     
  2. PT

    PT Physhicist

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    It's pretty much a personal preferance thing. Some people like to have their hands far apart when pulling the oars towards their chest and some like to have their hands close together. I feel that I get the most power with my hands closer together so I set them up so the oar handles are maybe 6" apart from each other.
    Just take a seat in your boat out on the lawn and loosen up the oar stops a bit. Pull on the oars as if you're rowing and figure out where they are the most comfortable and then tighten the oar stops down.
    Not a very clear explanation but at least I know what I'm talking about. :thumb:
    I hope that helps.

    Dave
     
  3. pwoens

    pwoens Active Member

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    hahahaha...ya I guess I should clarified....definately a personaly preference but I just read that the mfg suggest 3-6 inches between the tip of one handle to the tip of another. In the past mine have never been that close and I just thought maybe I had been way off on my oars??? Never seemed to have a problem with them wider, but wanted to see??

    Yes, that did make sense Dave ;) Thanks
     
  4. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!

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    Another way to go would be to set the oars up so that they overlap at the grips by about 6-9 inches.

    Then, after you have bruised the hell out of your fingers and hands a bunch of times you can set them farther apart!

    :cool:
     
  5. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    Hey Bob. Where do you get all of this useless information from. It takes a nut to think this all up. ;)

    Jim
     
  6. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!

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    Once upon a time this "nut" had very sore hands for a day.
    Cold over there this morning huh Jim ;)
     
  7. tomc

    tomc Member

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    Would you mind telling us what are you rowing?
     
  8. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    With these small boats, it's pretty tough. But you want your oars so they at your pull, you have the handles near your ribcage. You want optimum oar stroke. So as you pull back, your arms should be square with your shoulders, and as you do your pull your thumbs should just tap your ribcage. This will give you optimum pull, and at same time save your bacon if you ever stick an oar. Which will happen eventually. If you want a measurement, the oars should roughly be shoulder width apart. What this does is gets your arms doing the work. When you put the handles to close together, your back is doing more of the work actually (very bad to do). Your oarstroke is literally stopped by your chest, so of course your back comes into play.
     
  9. pwoens

    pwoens Active Member

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    I'll have my old man try this avenue....I think I'll stick to my old ways :clown: ;) :p

    Outcast PAC 9000

    This will make the tips of the oar handles roughly 16 inches apart. This is where mine have been in the past but the mfg says 3-6 inches, and thats what made me pop the question cause 3-6 inches seems awfully close...which would not be the most optimal angle/position/leverage?? Thats closer to Bob's recommendation.
     
  10. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, chances are the manufacturer never used the boats as much as they've said. On my old outcast, I actually modified the frame so I could put the oartower out a bit more. Plus, if you looke at most serious rowers, you won't see their oars that far in. What you can do, is try it out for a day and check each position out. You'll find you can row longer and at more peace with your body if they are almost shoulder width apart. Plus, like I said, the moment you stick an oar, you will regret having them adjusted anywhere near your chest.
     
  11. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    In your typical oar stroke you are using two sets of large muscles and numerous stabilizing ones. The major ones are your lats and biceps. You want to balance them so both can work together. With the oars closer together you use more bicep, apart you use more lats. Since you're liable to notice body reaction more than oar performance I'd head for a balance... :ray1:

    But then you're a young buck and have those big cannons, so you won't care... :rofl:
     
  12. pwoens

    pwoens Active Member

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    ya, whatever...im gettin phat and old, all at the same time :clown: Just talking about rowing is making me tired
     
  13. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!

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    Im glad Jerry weighed in on this issue so heavily... :eek:

    Seriously Pat, He is right; you have to set them up with adequate clearance and balance, and to protect yourself from getting harpooned by an oar when you inevitably stick an oar on the bottom, rocks etc.
     
  14. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast Active Member

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    And in my case, it's the perfect position for my thumbs to catch in the flaps of my rain jacket. I keep them set there though as it's still the most comfortable.
     
  15. Johnnyb

    Johnnyb Guest

    you guys have been focusing on the distance between the ends of the oars, and the relationship of those ends to the body... So what about the position - fore and aft - of the oarlocks to the body. My Southforks have three possible positions for the oars, and I am still trying to figure out what makes the most sense. Right now, I am thinking that there may be a need to for the variable positions based on how it feels to be rowing peacefully on a lake vs. more actively on moving water. Any thoughts on this?
     
  16. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    John, that is a tough one, and one I really don't have a real answer for. BUT, I do know when I had my first "fitted" frames built by an actual whitewater frame builder (not just someone who knows how to weld) he had me sit down, and adjusted the actual hole of the oar towers so that when I was sitting with my back straight up, that with my elbows at my ribcage and my arms bent forward at 90 degrees, that the oars would meet my hands and be perpendicular to the frame. Ok, if this sounds confusing, I can probably do a photoshop diagram of one. Basically when you are in mid stroke, your back is straight, you've brought the oars from an outstretched position to where your elbows are next to your ribs and the oars are sitting perpindicular to the frame, that's where you want the seat vs. oar towers to be. Easier to show then explain, but hopefully that helps. Basically once you've pulled the oar grips to your ribs, the oars should be facing a bit downstream, with your elbows at your side and your arms out naturally, they should be sitting straight out from the boat (not upstream or downstream any).
     
  17. Johnnyb

    Johnnyb Guest

    Actually, Jerry, I understand your description clearly, and it makes perfect sense to me. Either you are more articulate and descriptive that you may have thought - or I am not as dumb as I thought (If I'm betting, I'm choosing the former). I'll give your rule of thumb a try. Thanks alot.
     
  18. nympher54

    nympher54 New Member

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    JohnnyB

    Will you using oar rites on your raft? It will make a little difference as to the position of the oar stops...