Intruder Recipe Component

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by slippery_whippet, Dec 23, 2007.

  1. slippery_whippet

    slippery_whippet Member

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    I am trying to work out the recipe for a white intruder and cannot figure out the webby, mottled material used along with the ostrich plumes on the collar. At first it looked like guinea feathers, but these are much longer and webbier. I have also considered lady Amherst, but that is quite it either. Anyone have an idea what this material is? I have seen it on a number of intruder patterns in many colors, like royal blue mixed with purple ostrich, etc. Hope someone can clue me in. Thanks in advance.
    BTW, I'm not talking about the long slender grizzly hackles either, figured that much out already.
     
  2. Scott Behn

    Scott Behn Active Member

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    You are refering to the Rhea feathers I believe...

    :thumb:
     
  3. slippery_whippet

    slippery_whippet Member

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    It isn't rhea feathers, actually I think what I'm after is lady Amherst tail feathers (as opposed to the cape feathers). These look to be much longer and webbier. Has anyone used these?
     
  4. Chris DeLeone

    Chris DeLeone Active Member

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    Yes I get the full feather - they come in many colors - natural/white, black, purple/black, orange/black, red/black and pink/black. I have gotten them at Creekside in Issaquah. They are around $20.00.
    They are easy to tie in and look good -
    PM me and I can send you a photo or two of them so you know what they look like.
     
  5. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    Don't keep us in suspense, sharing is good.
     
  6. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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  7. Chris DeLeone

    Chris DeLeone Active Member

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    Here are the photos we discussed - they are Lady Amherst Center tail and I just tie in sections like turkey quills.

    DeLe
     

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  8. slippery_whippet

    slippery_whippet Member

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    Very nice Chris,
    That is definitely the ticket, thanks again for your help and edification.
    :thumb:
     
  9. Salmon Chaser

    Salmon Chaser Wannabe Spey God

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    Been using them on tubes and marabous for a few years now. Not the best pic but it's the first i found to use
    They take cool aid very well so one natural plume will do you for several colours.
    Salmon Chaser
     
  10. 1morecast

    1morecast Active Member

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    They also make great wings!!
     

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  11. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    In the original recipe I do believe it's actually dyed Ringneck Pheasant feathers not amhearst. Think I can dig up the pattern if anyone needs it.
     
  12. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Ok, I dug it up. Can't remember where I got this at. I do know I've carried this through 5 computers. So it's been around awhile. I love intruders, BUT I don't technically tie them. I'll explain. I guess I've tweeked it to work for me. Replaced a few parts, added a couple more, etc. I tie mine on tubes. It works for me, and was inspired by the original intruder (which I used to tie mine exactly like below).

    The Intruder:

    By Ed Ward

    Hook:
    The fly itself is tied on a size 2/0 Mustad 36890 salmon that has been straightened out and cut off. The trailer hook is a Daichii 2451-size 2 for steelhead that average under eight pounds, size 1 for those that run eight to 16 pounds. Sand smooth the part of the hook shank you have cut.

    Ribbing:
    Tie in a loop of 25-pound-test monofilament a quarter-inch up from the end of the shank. Tie in oval gold tinsel and take two wraps in back of the mono loop, one wrap in front.

    Rear Hackle:
    Tie in a long, soft, black hackle and take three wraps.

    Feelers:
    Tie in nine strands of dyed-orange ostrich plume, on each side of hook shank. Tie in dyed-orange ringneck pheasant tail and take three of four turns.

    Body:
    Tie in a long, skinny badger hackle and leave hanging. Tie in burnt-orange chenille and wrap forward tightly to within a half-inch of eye of the hook. Wind the badger hackle forward through chenille, ending with three successive turns at thee point where the chenille terminates. Spin a small clump of black deer hair and trim butts flush with the shank. Tie in orange ringneck pheasant tail and take three or four turns.

    Shell:
    Tie in two cree hackles on each side of the shank for “wings”. Tie in dyed-orange winea hackle and take four or five turns.

    Head:
    Tie in a small ball of black chenille. Tie in lead eyes. Whip finish. Cover head with Aquaseal thinned with Cotol.

    Tying Note 1:
    Ringneck pheasant tails are split down the stem with a single-edge razor, do they can be wrapped as a hackle. Soaking the tail for 10 minutes in warm water can aid in the splitting-and-wrapping process.

    Tying Note 2:
    Other species of pheasant produce differing appearances; Amherst is particularly striking.

    Rigging the Intruder:
    Pass your leader through the eye of the hook, then through the monofilament loop, then through a quarter-inch-long piece of 16-gauge electrical wire from which the wire core has been removed. Tie the leader to the trailer hook with Lefty Kreh’s nonslip loop knot. Push the electrical insulation up onto the end of the hook shank and pull slowly on the leader to draw the knot snugly into the other end of the insulation, making sure that everything pulls together with the hook point riding up.

    Ed prefers to tie the Intruder on straightened Mustad hook shanks. He shared with us that, for the innovative anadromous tier, the pattern can also be tied on tubes or Waddington shanks; this would eliminate the need for his clever monofilament loop, which you’ll learn about in this edition of Inside The Ultimate Fly Box. One more thought Ed asked us to share with you: Please do not tie the Intruder on single hooks larger than size 1/0. Single hooks larger than this, he reminds us can be harmful to wild steelhead, every one of which should be released alive and unharmed.
     
  13. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    No problem believing 'through 5 computers' when I read the following:

    "Pass your leader through the eye of the hook, then through the monofilament loop, then through a quarter-inch-long piece of 16-gauge electrical wire from which the wire core has been removed. Tie the leader to the trailer hook with Lefty Kreh’s nonslip loop knot. Push the electrical insulation up onto the end of the hook shank and pull slowly on the leader to draw the knot snugly into the other end of the insulation, making sure that everything pulls together with the hook point riding up."

    Man, that dates it back somewhere in the 70's? (Id not older)

    Edit: Jerry, forgot to add. Did you 'survive' Christmas in you delivery truck?
     
  14. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, barely survived. Was the worst Christmas on record (or could say the most successful if you're the boss lol). Hit record deliveries in our center, and had a reverse happen. Normally we peak the week before Christmas and slowly taper down to Christmas eve. Well, we kept peaking daily up until Christmas eve, each day being heavier then the previous. So was pretty amazing.
     
  15. slippery_whippet

    slippery_whippet Member

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    Thanks Jerry :)
    Nice to have the original recipe for comparison!
     

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