It's time to stand up

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by Joe Goodfellow, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. Joe Goodfellow

    Joe Goodfellow Active Member

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    It's time to stand up and say something to the tribes. As a Native American I'm embarrassed how the tribes run there fishery. It's time to say enough and lets make our runs better. So my question is how do you start a group to work with the tribes. If they saw another native heading the group I think they'll listen more. Maybe some one could help me write letters to the tribes? Or set up a protest anything to save our precious runs. It's time to get up and save our runs. Maybe start a non profit to pay the tribes not to gill net. How can we get this started ? As a native it's my meaning to save our Mother Earth so please help before it's to late.
     
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  2. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

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    Hi Joe,

    What Tribe are you a member of? The WA state treaty tribes are each sovereign nations (well, nations within a nation, and it gets more technical from there.). If you're familiar with tribalism, you understand that specific Tribal membership matters. The tribes work together for mutual interests and against one another for Tribal interests. Unless you're one of them, I don't think they'll value your input any more than they do mine.

    The tone of your post infers that tribes running their fisheries wrong and working against the welfare of the runs. You can say whatever you want to the tribes, but if you get a dialogue going I think you'll find that they believe they are already doing what they can to improve their respective salmon and steelhead runs. The tribes are very active in the habitat improvement and restoration arena.

    If you examine the catch and escapement data for almost any of WA state's salmon and steelhead runs, you'll see that harvest, including tribal treaty harvest, is NOT limiting productivity and abundance in the vast majority of the cases. Because river gill nets are visible, they seem to provoke a stronger negative emotional response than does the less directly visible effect of habitat degradation. I don't know why that is, and in your case I can't exactly attribute it to racism.

    Sincerely,

    Salmo g.
     
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  3. Ringlee

    Ringlee Doesn't care how you fish Moderator Staff Member

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  4. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

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    Bass,

    You may not bring much fishing to this forum, but there's no doubting that you're a contributor!

    Sg
     
  5. David Dalan

    David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

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    I don't know. Seems like a pretty balnket statement, you know "the tribes." I mean the Umatilla Indians (CTUIR), have been instrumental in returning Kings and Coho to the Umatilla, Kings to the Walla Walla and some of its tributaries. They are also a party to an agreement that restored summer flows to the Walla Walla (used to run dry from irrigation diversion in the belly of summer).

    The Nez Perce are also working in multiple states on fisheries enhancement projects. Yakamas are doing some cool stuff (recycling kelts, sockeye in lake cle elum) as well.

    The tribes can bring funding, and a legal claim to the resource to bear on efforts to restore populations. I realize there is probably an intent to harvest these restored runs as well. But in many cases they have worked for years and the economic return is nil. Tribal harvested Kings from the Umatilla above Pendleton are worth little or nothing from a $ standpoint. But they seem to have a pretty big value to the folks who get to exercise their rights to fish.

    I don't agree with everything that has been/is being done (native != hatchery), but to suggest that the tribes are a particularly sever part of the problem, for the most part, does not seem to be true.
     
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  6. My sister lives in Pendleton and i came across this video that Dave is talking about. pretty cool to see. when i talked to the guys at blue mountain angles he said that river was a predominately native steelhead river

     
  7. Luke77

    Luke77 I hope she likes whitefish

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    A bit off topic, but it always blows me away at how concerned we are with NOT letting a fish touch the rocks or lifting them out of the water or thrashing around too much cause they'll get brain damage....yet....I watch videos like this where fisheries people throw around, slide, and drop fish like dog toys.
     
  8. cook

    cook Member

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    Well said
     
  9. Only On A Fly

    Only On A Fly Active Member

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    Well put
     

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