Just another one of those despicable hatchery fish.

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Paul Huffman, Jan 25, 2003.

  1. Paul Huffman

    Paul Huffman Lagging economic indicator

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  2. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    Sheesh, guided gillnetting?


    Sorry, couldn't help myself . . .:rofl
     
  3. mtlhead

    mtlhead Member

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    Just a question, but why does that "Hatchery" fish still have it's adipose fin?:dunno
     
  4. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    The Quinaults don't clip most of their fish. Budget issues I've heard...
     
  5. hikepat

    hikepat Patrick

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    Is there a way to tell a fish is hatchery if the fin has not been clipped? The missing fin is the way I have always used to work out to keep a fish or not. I never keep wild fish but I will keep a few hatchery fish each year. How do they tell which fish to keep the eggs and sperm from and which fish are wild so to let them go back to the river to bread on their own? Or do they just figure all in the river are hatchery?:dunno
     
  6. dlw

    dlw New Member

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    I don't claim to be the best at guessing the weight of a fish, but I would say that one is at least 15lbs, probably in the low 20's. Hatchery fish of this size are very rare, which makes me belive this is probably a nate. The dorsal fin looks kind of deformed though so mabey its a hatchery fish. Since they don't clip em though there is probably no way to be sure. Dosen't seem like a very good method of protecting the few wild ones left.
     
  7. fly15

    fly15 New Member

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    Why would you clip the fins on your hatchery fish when your gill netting, it doesn't matter if it's a hatchery fish or a native once it's been caught in a net. They don't descriminate, the tribes keep hatchery fish and natives alike it doesn't matter to them. Plus once a fish is been in a gill net for a while the chances of it survivng even if they attempted to release the natives is next to nothing. It's not like catching one with sport fishing gear were you have the option of releasing native steelhead. All native steelhead should be released regardless of how well they are doing in a particular watershed. Just my .02 cents.

    fly15
     
  8. mcronariver

    mcronariver New Member

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    Yeah, I'm not too thrilled about commercial harvest of Steelhead either. You made some good points, I thought they had it all figured out--guess not?

    Mcronariver
     
  9. Paul Huffman

    Paul Huffman Lagging economic indicator

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  10. mtlhead

    mtlhead Member

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    Can the scales be examined on the bank to properly identify the fish, or is it a more intrusive method, requiring taking scale samples and veiwing them under a microscope? I don't take but maybe 1 fish per year, but it would be nice to be able to identify the fish before the release.:dunno
     
  11. dlw

    dlw New Member

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    Yeah, I guess it doesn't matter since everything in the nets is killed anyways, wild or not. Either way a dead 20lb. native is a significant loss on a stream where there may only be a few in the entire run. I would think that if hatchery fish were clipped though they could tell when the wild ones were coming in so they could limit or stop their netting. Seems like not clipping them is a convenient way to cover up the netting of wild ones.
     
  12. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    The thrill is not in the kill---But to let them go.

    When did you ever catch a fish,as long as we have been fishing together I yet to see you catch anything,except a few sea runs. You seem to do all your catching??? when I'm not around. Could I be saying something????. Maybe I am a jinx.

    Jim
     

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