Kayak Advice

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Tacoma Red, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. Tacoma Red

    Tacoma Red Active Member

    I'm thinking about getting a nice fishing kayak for the salt as well as stillwater lakes, and estuaries/rivers. Any advice will be appreciated as I know that there are very experienced and helpful people here. I'd also like to know about dealers and even instructors, books, courses, and of course needed accessories.

    Thanks very much!
     
  2. Tacoma Red

    Tacoma Red Active Member

  3. John Weston

    John Weston Member

    if it was me I would buy or build a fly fishing pram. they are not tippy and you can stand up in them to cast. oh sure you can do that in a kayak that's wide enough but why.
    Outlaw
     
  4. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    If the intended use was just to be in lakes and slower moving water, then a pram would be fine. A pram would also work for some saltwater applications. A pram can take a small gas O/B motor or an electric trolling motor.

    A fishing kayak is a different sort of beast, whose main advantage is portability and ease of launch. If you get one that is too heavy to easily car-top and transport to the water, then you have defeated its main advantage. Paddling is also quieter than rowing.
     
  5. Tacoma Red

    Tacoma Red Active Member

    Any experience out there with a Porta-Bote?
     
  6. Tacoma Red

    Tacoma Red Active Member

  7. John Weston

    John Weston Member

    Jim, I know kayaks are a different beast, I build them. I just got down designing a 8' pram that will be covered in Ballistic nylon and powered my a paddle wheel. very easy to portage and carry. it will be my lake boat. people also make prams that drift in rivers up to class 3. if Tacoma red is thinking a SoT yes that to is doable, I just like prams to fish out of. yes , my next pram will be a drift pram for rivers, lakes and salt.
    Outlaw
     
  8. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Outlaw, my pram is a Don Hill "mini-drifter." I have used it for lake fishing and in the tidal creeks, as well as floating rivers. My 30# thrust trolling motor gets mounted on the squared-off bow. The narrower stern with the anchor bracket then becomes the bow.
    Makes it perfect for powering upstream in the tidal creeks, then rowing back down.
    When I want to row back down, I just have to swap my cushion over to the other seat, tilt the motor up, re-orient my carcass 180 degrees, and grab the oars. It can be taken down class 3 if rowed by an expert. I have kept to the mellower floats, myself.
    Its design characteristics which make it great for rivers and small lakes are all wrong for windy days on big flat water, though.
    I usually avoid the windy days any more, but sometimes it catches ya by surprise.
     

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  9. John Weston

    John Weston Member

    Jim, your right windy days are the pits. I think the Don Hill is as good as anything out there. yes, class 3 rowed by an expert rower, not me I would probably crash and drown so I stay off of stuff like that but I would like to go with someone who knows what they are doing. don't think that I was being rude, I wasn't, just wanted to know why a kayak that's all.
    Outlaw
     
  10. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    I think I just like to be facing in the direction I'm moving. My opinion is that rowing against the current while going downstream is the best way to go down swifter rivers, and padding a yak is better for crossing longer expanses of flat water or poking around in backwaters or paddling upstream or making good time going downstream if not fishing.

    Other than some annoying hull slap if there's a bit of wind chop, the mini-drifter is fine for fishing smaller lakes, but it was meant to run rivers.