KEY PENINSULA ASSISTANCE

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by BARTOLOTTI, May 31, 2001.

  1. BARTOLOTTI

    BARTOLOTTI New Member

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    I AM HITTING THE STILLY IN THE MORNING TOMORROW FOR STEELIES, AND THEN MY WIFE AND FAMILY ARE HEADING TO HOME, WA TO STAY ON THE BEACH. WE ARE GOING TO BE ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE KEY PENINSULA AND I WANT TO FISH FOR SEA RUN CUTTS. I NEVER HAVE; AND FURTHERMORE, I AM NOT AN AVID SALT GUY. WHAT WOULD ONE USE AS FAR AS FLIES? COULD I FISH RIGHT OFF THE POINT OR SHOULD I FISH BY THE MOUTH OF A CREEK? I GO OVER MINISTER CREEK TO GET THERE. TIDES PLAY A ROLE I'M SURE, BUT I DON'T KNOW TO WHAT DEGREE. IF SOMEONE COULD PLEASE HELP, IT WOULD BE MUCH APPRECIATED. THANKS AND GOOD LUCK TO EVERYONE TOMORROW. -GLEN
     
  2. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    I wouldn't get hung up over the stream mouth/beach face issue. In my experience cutts are where you find them. They seem to be quite numerous this year. As to tides, fish moving water either ebb or flow, avoid the slack. Fish points, tidal rips, anything that breaks up the current. Fishing over sea grass, or other algae/vegetation is a good idea too.

    As to flies, the fish seem to be hitting streamers well now. I have also heard reports that some are being taken on poppers.

    Good luck all on opening day.
     
  3. Greg

    Greg Member

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    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON Jun-01-01 AT 02:14 PM (PST)[/font][p]Bartolotti,

    Nearly all my fly fishing is in the salt surrounding the Kitsap Peninsula. I target Silvers and Cutts most of the time. FWIW, my best success for Cutts over the past several years has been, and continues to be as recent as yesterday, with a #8 pink shrimp pattern (Umpqua Shrimp Pink Sparkle Blend for the body, burnt mono eyes tied in at the bend, Pink Crystal Flash pulled over from the bend between the mono eyes and then on to the hook eye leaving two strands out for "feelers" at the bend and then wrapped with fine copper wire; finish with a heavy bead of head cement to imitate a carapace (shell)across the top.

    Folks are currently doing well casting #6 Angel Hair Clousers (white/peacock to imitate small Herring)for Silvers and several guys are doing pretty well on Silvers by casting poppers around the Narrows Bridge area - both are deadly for the Silvers if fished correctly - the action has picked up significantly over the past two weeks.

    I assume you'll be wading. Fishing points will work for you but more important is the bottom structure and contour. Find rocky beaches to fish from and try to drift your fly across holes, depressions, oyster beds, sandbars etc. Cutts like moving water and are most active during the middle of a strong incoming tide especially during the morning hours, but they are around at all periods of the tide. Cutts are found around the Sound although its true you'll find more of them within a mile or two of a good creek or a river's estuary - Minter Creek won't be much help to you on the West side of the Key Peninsuala. If you fish a shrimp pattern such as the one I described above, fish it within about 1-3 feet of the bottom and give it a "twitch, twitch, pause" action. "Twitch" resembles the action you would give to shaking down a thermometer...only about 6" taken in on the strip; "pause" should last somewhere around 10 seconds or so...you're trying to imitate the swimming action of a live shrimp.

    No need to get fancy on the line setup...a WF-5,6 or 7-F or FS will work well along with a 5-7 ft leader and 6# or 8# tippet. Some folks like using a clear mono intermediate sinking line - I know I do. Since switching to one, I've found I like it VERY much.

    Good luck; hope this got to you in time and helped.
     
  4. BARTOLOTTI

    BARTOLOTTI New Member

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    I just got back... no fish; But, this is awesome. Than you very much for the information. I was rushed, split between 4 hours of steelheading and going to the Key Peninsula. I will study and be way more prepared next time. Please keep the tips coming. I know nothing about salt/SRC (until now), anything like this is much appreciated.
    -glen
     
  5. Greg

    Greg Member

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    Glen,

    Better luck on your next trip. Happy to hear you enjoyed the experience none-the-less. Several points I failed to mention in my haste:

    Be sure you rinse your gear thoroughly with fresh running water. That includes inside your reel, your line, the guides and reel seat on your rod as well as the flies in your fly box if you used any that were not tied on salt-specific hooks. A light coat of WD-40 on the reel and guides is a good thing after drying them. If you used a fresh water fly in the salt and returned it to your fresh water fly box, I'll guarantee the next time you open that box most hooks will have begun rusting. :( If you allow salt water to dry on your line, it will leave tiny salt crystals that will act like fine sandpaper on the guides and the line's coating - not a good thing over time. Rinse it, dry it, dress it and you'll be good to go.

    Cutts like cruising the shore and many, if not most, will be found within 50 or so feet of the shoreline. No need to go wading in up to your chest to start casting. Fan a dozen or so casts in a semicircle first before wading in to pick up on the shore-huggers and then wade in only as far as truly necessary to reach a likely lair.

    Cutts also like rips (areas where currents/turbulence and calm waters meet) as they create havoc for small marine life (amphipods, copepods) which serve as appetizers or entrees. A productive tactic (assuming rocky bottom etc. as previously mentioned) is to cast to where the fly will drift into and along a rip.

    I agree, it is an awesome fishery and one that is within very easy reach. A truly exciting experience that can happen (and has happened) during a leisurely day casting for Cutts or resident Silvers is hooking into a sizeable Blackmouth ...Nantucket Sleigh Ride revisited. :7
     

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