Lincoln Park SRC (???) success

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by SteelieD, Dec 28, 2006.

  1. Eric Tarcha

    Eric Tarcha gear whore

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    I hit Lincoln Park yesterday and had a great afternoon. Was there for only 2 hours and hooked around 12 fish, landed 10....all resi Coho and Kings (10-18 in). What great fun on a 5 weight! They hit any baitfish pattern I threw out there.

    Great Day!

    Eric :beer1:
     
  2. Salmon fisher

    Salmon fisher Member

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    Hi everybody. I’m thinking about fishing browns point or Lincoln park tomorrow. I know we’ve been having some high tides lately, so I was wondering if both places are fishable at the high.

    Thanks for your help

    Peter
     
  3. SteelieD

    SteelieD Non Member

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    Awesome, everyone's nailin 'em!

    Peter, I don't know Brown's but Lincoln can be tougher at high tide just because of the fact that you're liable to hook a walker on the path! Low is much easier. Be sure to fish a moving tide.

    Check here for tide times if you haven't already...
    http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/tides/WA/Seattle/

    Be sure to let us know how you did!

    BTW - snowboarding at Snoqualmie was great today! Sunny and beautiful!

    Happy new year!!!
     
  4. Dan Massaro

    Dan Massaro Member

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    Peter,
    I fished brown at high tide today. I lost probaly 3 flies to sloppy backcasts, but if you can find a fairly high spot (large boulders all over the point) you can get your line above the rocks behind you. The best fishing for me was really right before the high tide. I hope this all helps you make your decision. Good Luck.
     
  5. RedFive

    RedFive Member

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    Well, since we're talking about how good the beach fishing's been lately...

    Caught this bad boy a couple of days ago in the salt.

    Big surprise on a 6 weight. :)

    Sorry about the image size. How do I do the thumbnail thing?

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Eric Tarcha

    Eric Tarcha gear whore

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    HOLY SMOKE!! Nice.
     
  7. TomB

    TomB Active Member

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    guys- the first two fish are both chinook without a question...notice the spots on the lower lobe of the caudal fin...coho dont have spots there. Also...IMPORTANT- salmon and cutts are much more vulnerable to injury due to handling while in the salt (ever notice the scales coming off?) for this reason, they should be handled with care....please leave wild threatened chinook in the water
     
  8. Willie Bodger

    Willie Bodger Still, nothing clever to say...

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    Intersting. I would have thought they were more hardy in the salt as they would not be in full-spawn mode yet. There's always something to learn. For this reason I prefer to LDR all fish under 5 lbs... :D
     
  9. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    First fish resident coho, second fish little blackmouth (also, notice the difference in smell between the two. The blackmouth has its own distinct odor).
     
  10. Lex

    Lex Active Member

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    iagree with Richard
     
  11. Willie Bodger

    Willie Bodger Still, nothing clever to say...

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    Hmm... funny, I don't smell any difference between the two... ;)
     
  12. RedFive

    RedFive Member

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    Blackmouth smell kind of like metal and apples and coho are just metal.

    Weird, I know, but it's true. I confirmed it again a few days ago.
     
  13. Roger Stephens

    Roger Stephens Active Member

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    My sense of smell puts a blackmouth's aroma as somewhat like that of a herring but not quite as strong while a coho has a mild or almost non-existent aroma in comparison.

    Roger
     
  14. SteelieD

    SteelieD Non Member

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    OK - bear with me here (again, a salt/salmon newb).

    A Coho is a silver, right?

    And a Chinook is also know as a King or Blackmouth?

    Is there some info on the local timing of salmon runs that I can read?

    I'm learning alot here and I'm alot more fired up about fishing the salt than I thought I might be. Pretty cool. Thanks!
     
  15. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    You got it.

    coho = silver
    rezzie=resident coho/silvers that don't head out to the ocean and chill out in the sound for part of the year
    blackmouth=resident king that does pretty much the same thing

    Correct me if I'm wrong guys.
     
  16. RedFive

    RedFive Member

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    Pick up a copy of 'The Estuary Fly Fisher,' by Steve Raymond to learn a little bit more about residents and a little less about blackmouth.

    In a nutshell, "resident" salmon are indeed those that don't head out to the ocean. In the book I mentioned, the author says something like an estimated 3% of each class year of coho and chinook residualize. Of course, the rezzie coho population is buffered by the late-release program mentioned earlier so that figure might be a little higher.

    My question is: is there a blackmouth (resident chinook) program? I noticed a few that I caught this past weekend were missing their adipose fin. Are those fish that just decided to residualize or are they late release?
     
  17. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

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    It is really important to be able to accurately identify the fish you catch.
    Good Fishing,
    Les Johnson
     
  18. Will Atlas

    Will Atlas Guest

    I hate to harp on it, but I agree with Thomas. Those guys are the future spawners of Puget Sounds rivers and streams. Salmon and Cutts are definately more delicate in the salt and deserve our respect. Try and keep them in the water. I dont see any reason to toss an 8" juvenile salmon on the rocks to photograph it.
    Peace,
    Will
     
  19. Roger Stephens

    Roger Stephens Active Member

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    Redfive:

    From the early 1970's to the early 1980's Frank Hawes of the Washington dept. of Fisheries was instrumental in running a delayed release program for chinook salmon using Percival Cove in Capitol Lake in Olympia as the rearing site. During that period there was a excellent winter fisheries for blackmouth in south Puget Sound. The program was discontinued because of water qaulity concerns, cormorant predation of chinook smolt,and noise concerns to scare away cormoronts. Until the late 1990's WDFW also had a delayed release program(a decade or so approx. 100,000 fish) for chinook from net pens in Tanglewood Cove in Hale Passage. I believe it was discontinue due to cost concern.

    The delayed release chinook program provided a quality fisheries similar to the delayed release coho program except fish numbers caught was not as high due lower levels of released chinook smolt. It was a very popular fisheries for gear fishermen.

    The WDFW might construct a new hatchery on the lower Deschutes River near Olympia. A proposed part of the hatchery would be a delayed release program for chinook. It will be interesting to see if it is ever built.

    Other than that I don't know of any delayed release program at present for chinook. Maybe someone else has some more information.

    Roger
     
  20. Canoe Rider

    Canoe Rider Member

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    My thought is all fish to be released should be left in the water. But sometimes no choice to bring out to release the hook. Just try to be careful.

    My guess is C&R fishing in the Sound still has the lowest impact on populations compared to other human uses.
     

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