lineX on the bottom of a driftboat?

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Clint F, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. Clint F

    Clint F Fly Fishing Youth

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    Ok my question is, has anyone rowed a driftboat with a linX'ed bottom or a bottom similar to lineX? My thought is that it will be pushed by the water easier than a fiberglass hull. I have rowed fiberglass and aluminum driftboats. What difference is there between these and a lineX'ed bottom?

    Clint
     
  2. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Clint, great question. I saw a guy with some sort of spray on stuff on his pontoons lower halves. I wanted to ask him about it but was too embarassed not knowing if this was common or not. I'm curious to see if those in the know would recommend some sort of coating (smooth or textured) to the underside of a glass, wood or aluminum boat for durability and sound deadening. Again, cool question.
     
  3. Clint F

    Clint F Fly Fishing Youth

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    I am just asking concerning a wooden boat. I love the way my dads aluminum River Wolf rows. Our old fiberglass boat was very touchy when you were rowing (it did not track very well).

    Clint
     
  4. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Active Member

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    I Line-X'd the raised bow section (plywood) and the rear storage compartment bottom (also plywood) of my 19' aluminium CC a few years ago. The compartment holds two batteries and 2 six gal. fuel tanks (ventilated and partitioned). Nothing slides around when I tow or on the water. The bow section maintains the ambient temp. and does not get hot to the touch in the direct sunlight. It does not get slippery like the other spray-on coatings will. I did the rear compartment in black and the bow in a dark grey. The lighter shades of grey will take on a slightly greenish tinge when exposed to the sunlight for an extended period of time. Covering the surface while in storage will greatly impede the discoloration. I had both sides and edges of the plywood sprayed to prevent moiture from entering the wood. So far, they still look as good as new. I am quite pleased with it and would recommend it. Its very easy to maintain requiring only light scrubbing (dried blood,etc) or just a hosing off. I have considered doing the entire floor, but am concerned about the added weight it would add. Hope this helps. I have no affiliation with the product.
     
  5. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Active Member

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    Sorry! I just scanned your post and should have read it more carefully. I think the rough surface would add a good deal of drag/resistance making it difficult to control. JMHO.
     
  6. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    LOL fishdontcare. I do that all the time (not reading all the way). I've tried my best to slow down anymore. But you're right, the lineX on the gunnels, open plywood, etc inside a boat is awesome. I'm tempted once my driftboat is done to have the floors shot with lineX.

    Onto the bottoms. I don't think what you saw was LineX. Was Gluvit, or a similar product. They use it mostly on Aluminum driftboats, but have seen people use it on glass boats (whose bottoms are worn badly). It's a fiberglass mixture that makes the bottoms smooth and makes aluminum glide over rocks. Not stick like they normally have a tendency to do. But using lineX on the bottoms would have the opposite effect. You'll have an extra STICKY bottom. It'll add a tad of drag, but will suck when you get to obstructions. Glass bottoms already glide. On the bottoms of a toon, they may put linex only to help protect it. Doubt they put gluvit it on it. For a wood boat, gluvit is the bomb on the bottoms. Helps seal and protect your bottoms.
     
  7. Zane Wyll

    Zane Wyll Member

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    Clint the wood drifboat I bought from Montana boat builders came with a spray on liner on the whole bottom of the boat. It was sprayed on without the texture so it was smooth. It is very effective for protection and was a very nice rowing boat. My brother now has the boat but it is holding up very well.
     
  8. Clint F

    Clint F Fly Fishing Youth

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    Thanks for the help. If anyone else has any comments I would love to hear them.


    Clint
     
  9. Joshw

    Joshw Tamer of Trouts

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    I am currently working on a wooden boat build and my bottom is graphite mixed with epoxy which is the "old" way to do it. Now it seems the majority of stitch and glue DB builders are putting some type of truck bed liner on the bottoms of there boats. After the first season I'll probably be putting linex on the bottom.


    This is what Jason at Montana Boat Builders had to say about his bottoms...

    "I use Linex over one layer of kevlar and two layers of 6 oz glass. The same layup on the inside without the Linex. The dealer who sprays the stuff for us sprays the bottom as smooth as possible but textures the sides just for uniform appearance. It's not glassy smooth but it's pretty good.

    The whole idea with the Linex is to have a surface that is very abrasion resistant and doesn't need to be resurfaced. Linex is a polyurethane according to the manufacturer but the actual chemical make up is there trade secret so I really don't know what it is. I can tell you that we have had very few dmage reports with it and just two actual repairs that have come in to our shop. But one thing we don't do anymore is flip over boats and redo the bottoms. We have some guide boats with 500 days on them and the same untouched bottom.

    It's not that hard to redo a graphite/glass bottom but it does take some time and effort and the chines take a beating, whether framed or s&G. Since a lot of our customers are not as handy as most of us do-it-yourselfers, the Linex is a good happy medium. I think you could do a plascore bottom with twice or three times the amount of composites and have a very strong bottom. But you will be recoating it every so often and it will be more expensive, and more work.

    I think that people might expect too much from Linex as far as it's slipperyness. It is definately not as slippery as gel coat or epoxy graphite. If you have to try and slide your boat down 2 inches of water, it won't do it. But remember that when you do that with any other surface, you are damaging the surface. Running over rocks in a gel coated boat or epoxy graphite boat, leaves material on the rocks! That's why it slides so well. It's not like it's kryptonite.
    With a plascore and linex bottom, you have saved enough weight that you will be able to go in shallower water than with a full plywood and fiberglass bottom. So there is a little trade off.

    I have heard people say that they think there is more drag in water with Linex too. And there probably is, since it's not as smooth. Although, there is some hydrodynamic advantage to a slightly rough surface according to some experts. So I'm not certain of that. I do know that there isn't a single boat made that can hold back against the current better than a light weight cored and Linex'ed s&g boat. Remember, you are usually in 5mph water or less, so does it really make that big of a difference? I really doubt it. If there is some miracle material that is harder than Linex, does chip and is smooth, you can bet we'll all be using it soon.

    In the end it's just a matter of where you want to spend your money and time. There are pros and cons to every part of your boat construction and everything is a compromise. For my boats, a few hundred bucks of somebody else putting on a nasty chemical once and it's done is good enough for me."

    Josh
     
  10. Clint F

    Clint F Fly Fishing Youth

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    Thanks for the help. Do you guys think the bottom will be strong enough if I sprayed lineX over the plywood for the bottom?

    Clint
     
  11. Joshw

    Joshw Tamer of Trouts

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    Are you building a new boat? Refurbishing an old one? Traditional framed construction or stitch and glue? If you are refurbishing an old one what is currently on the bottom? Linex isn't going to provide any real strength just abrasion resistance.

    Josh
     
  12. Crump

    Crump Member

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    I had my wood boat lineXed about a year ago. The boat had been glassed, and was relatively tough, but over time, I could see that I was going to have to do some reglassing in parts to keep it up to par. The LineX has really helped the wear on the bottom and now I don't hesitate sliding the boat down hills, over gravel bars, etc...

    The addition of the LineX doesn't seem to affect rowing at all, and I would highly recommend it to anyone that has a wood boat.

    My next project is a wooded sled, and I am thinking a combo of LineX and UHMW for the bottom...

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Clint F

    Clint F Fly Fishing Youth

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    Thanks Crump thats what I wanted to hear. I am building a kit from montana boat builders.

    Clint
     
  14. Joshw

    Joshw Tamer of Trouts

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    Any pictures of the progress?

    Josh
     
  15. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    Interesting thread! My '76 Don Hill Classic has an epoxy/graphite over glass bottom and I have been pretty diligent about applying more epoxy/graphite in areas where dings occur, or on the bottom where it scrapes gravel and I start to see the glass showing thru. I don't want to have to replace the whole damn thing so I just try to keep up with the coating to keep the glass intact.

    I may have to at least look into the LineX option next time I feel the need for some maintenance.
     
  16. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Jim, that's gluvit you're using (or an alternate named product). Great stuff and makes the bottom glassy smooth. I know what Josh post was stating about not having to reapply and hitting rocks leaves the coating. But we're in the PNW, where we have glacial rivers and LOTS of rocks. So scraping bottoms is what happens. And dragging boats is a common practice. I know moving my buddies 18' willie with gluvit bottom over rocks was NICE! Was like it was almost on wheels (and I say ALMOST).

    Yeah, you have to reapply, but it's worth the money to me. I'd have to look into the smooth Linex. But with weight in the boat scraping on a rock, I wonder how "smooth" it'll respond going over it. I've only dealt with the lineX in my truck, and it's a BEAR trying to move stuff in and out of it. Protects the bed, but getting stuff in and out of it is a pain to slide. But it's the rough stuff. Maybe I should have it taken out and have smooth reapplied. It's a good 10+ years old and looking pretty rough anyways. But would love to get some actual on river experience of our rivers with the lineX bottoms applied.
     
  17. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    This the stuff... yeah, it's like glass. The boat tracks so nicely and gets thru the skinny water easy.
     

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  18. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    Small hand in the air question.

    "X-linded" is a new term for me ... what is it?
    Fred
     
  19. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Fred, that's having lineX put on or under the boat. It's the bedliner stuff sprayed into trucks.

    Jim, yeah that's it. That graphite resin you toss onto the epoxy really makes that baby glide. My old glass boat is showing her age. I'm in the middle of a major retrofit. Now, if I would leave her torn down and finish her I'd be ok. But I toss her back together enough to fish then put her back in the garage and restrip. LOL. I'm tempted to rehit the bottom with gluvit. Give her some new life.
     
  20. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    I bought my boat a few years ago and haven't had to tear it all the way down (yet). Luckily I've been able to get by with just fixing up the spots that have issues. Hopefully I'll be able to continue with that for some time - little carpentry experience and zero boat building experience makes me a little jittery about really breaking 'er down. Hell, I might pay someone to do it when it comes time to fully replace the bottom.
     

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