Lochsa Special SBS

Discussion in 'Fly Tying Step by Step / Video' started by ScottP, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. ScottP Active Member

    Posts: 590
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    Waiting for my plane in the Bozeman airport a few years ago, I picked up a copy of Flyfishing and Tying Journal and came across an excellent article written by Al and Gretchen Beatty about the Lochsa River. In the article was a picture of this fly - sorta kinda H&L Variant/Wulff (also very similar to Charlie Craven's GTH Variant) which looked like a fun one to tie. Although I didn't get to the Lochsa the following summer, I did use this fly on a number of streams on the East side of those mountains and the fish seemed interested. Not a hard fly to tie, just a matter of watching proportions and maintaining thread control.

    hook - Dai Riki 320 #12
    thread - UTC 70 chartreuse
    tail - moose body hair
    abdomen - Uni Stretch chartreuse
    thorax - peacock herl
    wing - calf body hair
    hackle - brown

    Part 1


    mash barb and attach thread at 75% mark

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    clean, stack and measure a clump of calf body hair (shank length)

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    tie in with 2 firm wraps

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    and continue back with firm wraps

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    trim butts at an angle (I was a bit steep here)

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    brush with a little Sally and move thread back to point above barb

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    clean, stack and measure a clump of moose body hair (shank length)

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    tie down and wrap forward (firmly) to wing butts

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    trim tail butts and smooth over with tying thread

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    tie in Uni Stretch

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    wrap forward to 50% mark; tie off

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    move thread in front of wing and create thread dam

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    crease with thumbnail to force fibers up and back

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    divide wing with 3 wraps from front to back

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    repeat with 3 wraps from back to front

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    post near wing; 5 wraps up post and 1 behind wings to lock in place

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    repeat for far wing; brush wing base with a little Sally

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    return thread to 40% mark

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    tie in a couple peacock herls and twist with tying thread to create chenille

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    wrap forward to 50% mark and tie off

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    prepare a hackle and tie in between wings

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    wrap hackle, 4 turns behind, 7 in front (thanks Mr. Whiting); half hitch x2, trim and SHHAN

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    I've also tied it in orange (always been a good color for cutts for me) and with foam back for additional floatation, but I've tied this one as close to the Beatty's recipe as possible.

    Regards,
    Scott
    Richard Olmstead, Jackd and GAT like this.
  2. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 3,983
    Willamette Valley, OR
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    The last time we fished the Lochsa, years and years and years ago, a Yellow Humpy was the fly of choice so I can see why that one would work quite well.
  3. Richard Olmstead BigDog

    Posts: 2,483
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    About 10 years ago, on a visit to the North Fork Clearwater, I met a fly fisherman from Portland who gave me a fly that a friend of his tied specifically for the North Fork. He called it "Dave's Deluxe" aka the "North Fork Special." It has a calf tail 'wing' that isn't split, a deer or elk tail, and a yellow dubbed body. He tied it with an oversized hackle to ride high in the bouncy water.

    Dave\'s Deluxe NFork special.jpg

    ... and it catches fish
    Dave\'s Deluxe.jpg

    The two forks (North Fork and Lochsa) are so similar that the Lochsa Special is, no doubt imitating the same thing. He tied it on a size 10 dry fly hook and I wondered what the hell it was supposed to imitate, but I didn't worry too much about that, because the cutts loved it. Then one year I was there in mid-July and hit a Green Drake hatch. Then I realized what it was supposed to be! I'm sure the Lochsa Special, which is more of a lime green like the bugs are, is for the same hatch, but the nice thing is that those fish will hit it long after the big Green Drakes are gone.

    Dick
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  4. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 3,983
    Willamette Valley, OR
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    Considering the luck I've had using a Yellow Humpy on rivers and some lakes, both of the patterns should work equally as well. I can't tie a Humpy worth a damn but I think I can manage those flies.

    (I'm completely inept when it comes to tying flies that include deer hair. I was born deer hair challenged.)
  5. ScottP Active Member

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  6. Richard Olmstead BigDog

    Posts: 2,483
    Seattle, WA
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    Scott -

    My version of the Dave's Deluxe has a mixed brown/grizzly hackle (oversized, but trimmed a bit on the bottom) and I use the tag end of the tying thread to rib the abdomen, giving them a segmented look (green drakes have pronounced dark joints between the segments) an making them a little more durable.

    D

    Dave\'s Deluxe RGO variant.jpg
  7. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 3,983
    Willamette Valley, OR
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    Scott, still a lot of work for a dry fly pattern... think I'll go with the patterns shown in the thread... besides, what good is the deer hair shellback used with a Humpy? The fish don't see it. I've always wondered about that.
  8. Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Seattle, WA
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    I assumed the shell back was for extra flotation on rough water.
  9. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 3,983
    Willamette Valley, OR
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    I haven't noticed that they float any better than a Royal Wulff in rough water. Of course, the assumption by who ever originated the Humpy what that the extra hair added to flotation but was it ever tested to see if it really does?

    I doubt if it floats any better than a Tied Down Caddis that also has a deer hair tail and shellback. And I can't say a Tied Down Caddis floats any longer than a Elk Hair Caddis.

    Time for another scientific (kind'a) test of the patterns! :D
  10. ScottP Active Member

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    Gene,

    I think the hump is for floatation, too. I tie Humpies just to prove to myself I can do it; I fish Foam-backed Convertibles because they work as well, are easy to see and float all day long.

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    Regards,
    Scott
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  11. Richard Olmstead BigDog

    Posts: 2,483
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    Scott -
    I like those a lot. I tie and fish a lot of parachute Madame X as a bushy dry fly, but they are a step or two more complicated than I prefer. Yours look like they would have +/- the same profile and be easier to tie.

    Am I correct that the calf tail trude wing and upright wing are the same clump of hair?

    Dick
  12. ScottP Active Member

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    Richard,

    That's correct; I stack the calftail to get the tips for the Trude portion as even as possible, and trim the butts for the Wulff's wings to length. Here's a SBS I did using a synthetic wing:
    http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/index.php?threads/sanchez-ragtop.81636/

    Regards,
    Scott
  13. Richard Olmstead BigDog

    Posts: 2,483
    Seattle, WA
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    Scott,
    Thanks for calling that link to my attention. I'm going to tie some of them before the summer.

    That SBS also shows an interesting use of soft wire to hold materials out of the way while wrapping hackle, or doing some other step. For that purpose, I keep some segments of plastic drinking straws of varying diameters that are slit lengthwise to slip over materials that I want to hold out of the way. They are easy on and off. I'll try to remember to post a pic later.

    Dick

    Not exactly every barb in place, but good enough to do a whip finish.
    Madame X with straw sections.jpg
  14. ScottP Active Member

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    Dick,

    The soda straw is a great tool and I have used it; with bigger flies, like the Convertible in a #10 or #12, I had trouble getting it to stay over the legs, body and wing, so I started using the non-tox wire.

    Regards,
    Scott
  15. Gary Knowels Active Member

    Posts: 1,073
    Seattle, WA
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    Scott,
    When you do that Sanchez Ragtop in colors other than peacock so you just dub the body heavily or use another type of material?
  16. ScottP Active Member

    Posts: 590
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    Gary,

    I've used a lot of different materials for the bodies on Convertibles - dubbing, Flat-waxed thread, Uni-Stretch, Sexi-floss, Furry Foam; with the color selection available in the spandex products like Sexi-floss, I'm tying more and more with that stuff.

    Regards,
    Scott
  17. Gary Knowels Active Member

    Posts: 1,073
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +392 / 0
    Thanks! I think these will be great for some of the heavy broken water I like to fish on the Snoqualmie. I'll tie up a bunch in various colors for this summer's adventures