Lookin' to upgrade

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Dipnet, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Dipnet

    Dipnet aka Tim Hartman

    So I've only been tossing salty flies for about 3 months but I gotta say, I'm hooked!

    I've caught a lot of SRC on spin gear in the past but I'm havin' much more fun tossing flies!!

    Anyway, I wasn't havin' too much luck until yesterday when I went fishing with an old friend who's much more experienced in the fly game. He took me to a beautiful spot and gave me a lot of tips on technique and his help paid off with several nice SRC! He also let me fish his higher-end gear for awhile and I could really feel the difference from my hand-me-down outfit.

    So I'm wanting to upgrade the rod/reel without spending the next mortgage payment.

    Been lookin' at reviews/recommendations on the interweb and I'm thinkin' maybe I'll buy the rod first.

    Kinda intrigued with the Redington Voylant (maybe 6 wt 9 1/2 ft.? Thinkin' I can use it for both SRC and coho) and wanting to know if anyone fishes it and opinions.

    Also, what about matching it with a Lamson/Waterworks Konic reel?

    I appreciate any input and recommendations!

    TIA!! :)
     

  2. Lamson reels are great I have used the velocity before and have nothing but positive things to say about their prduct
     
  3. Jeff Peacock

    Jeff Peacock Member

    I use a Konic on my 6wt when fishing the salt. I really like how tight the drag mechanism is and feel it helps keep the salt out even though I wash/rinse after every trip. Two thumbs up on the Lamson. Now if they would just make the Konic with a large arbor.....
     
  4. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

    I have the sage VT2 697, its a 4 piece 9ft6in 6wt, with fighting butt, and saltwater reel seat, I got it on closeout at patricks shop for $335, Absolutley love it. You can still find deals online but I would definately get the saltwater version with the butt, the freshwater non butt version has a funky reel seat the looks like it will crossthread really easy.

    I toss a 6wt floating outbound trout LT, which I like alot, also a streamertip 7wt line that has 15ft intermediate clear tip. works great for minimal false casting and cutting through the wind.
     
  5. Dipnet

    Dipnet aka Tim Hartman

    This is all great info and thanks for it!! So how 'bout the Volant rod? :)
     
  6. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

    Never used it but Redington makes some great products at very reasonable prices. You may think about searching the classifieds for a used stick of higher quality at the same price point.

    Sent from my SGH-T679 using Tapatalk 2
     
  7. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

  8. rotato

    rotato Active Member

    How does the warranty change w/ ownership transfer?
    That is a good used rod
     
  9. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

    A 9' 6" 6wt would be a excellent beach stick. If you can get a salty version even better.
    A little much for searuns and winter resident coho, but perfect for coho in the summer through fall.
    Excellent when the wind comes up as well.
    Everything is a bit of a compromise as one stick can't do it all, but a 9' 6" 6 wt covers a lot of fishing opportunities in my opinion.
     
  10. PfleugerPhister

    PfleugerPhister Active Member

    I like Lamson, aside from my $800 Vanquish that completely blew apart on it's first Neah Bay salmon
     
    skokomish fly likes this.
  11. daveypetey

    daveypetey Active Member

    Just 2 throw in my 2 cents, my Reddington reel is great and picked it up on clearance for cheap. I. The order of how I spend my money by what I feel really makes a difference goes line>>>>>>rod>reel.
     
  12. Steve Knapp

    Steve Knapp Beach Bum

    I think Redington is a great company, but I haven't tried their rods yet. I always throw out TFO's BVK 691 for a great intro beach rod. I've been using it for almost two years now, no complaints.
     
  13. Dipnet

    Dipnet aka Tim Hartman

    OK, after prowling the web for awhile, talking to folks and finally swingin' a few rods I took the plunge and today picked up a 4-piece, 9' , 6 wt. Redington Predator. It felt really good to me and I like the fact that it's produced locally with a great warranty.

    I'll take it out tomorrow to see how it works in the real world of the Puget Sound.

    It felt nearly as good as the Sage VXP I borrowed for a little while last weekend but then, as a novice fly-flailer, what the heck do I know???? :p:confused::p

    I know they're both produced on Bainbridge Island but the Sage I fished for awhile, thanks to the largess of my friend, is a bit too pricey for me!

    I'm thinkin' and hopin' that the Predator will satisfy my needs.

    I'm still in need of upgrading my reel and I see that there's some good deals on the original Konic.

    So that begs the question: what's the differences between the original ver and the Konic II?

    Also, should I go with a large arbor reel instead and although I think I know the advantages, maybe smarter folks can further educate me?

    TIA! :)
     
    Eyejuggler likes this.
  14. Dipnet

    Dipnet aka Tim Hartman

    Although there was no joy for south Sound rezzies today, it was a joy playin' with the new stick!
     
    Eyejuggler likes this.
  15. kylesw

    kylesw Member

    I use the original konic for my 6 wt searun setup (TFO Clouser rod and RIO outbound short). I've been very pleased so far- the drag system is exceptional!

    My hope was to use the same 6wt setup for pinks this summer, and have a reel with a strong enough drag to handle any incidental silvers. I was a little worried about getting into any big fish on this setup, that was until I landed a hatchery steelhead with ease thanks to the drag on the konic :D

    As for the new version of the konic, I think they share the same dimensions and components (new and old spools are interchangeable). The difference is in the color and possibly the finish (sounds like they new ones have a polyurethane finish).

    Bottom line - I wouldn't hesitate to go with the Konic. Buy the old one if saving $$ is your game, but keep in mind you may not be able to find spare old-model spools and then you just won't be the most fashionable man out there on the beach ;)
     
  16. Jonathan Tachell

    Jonathan Tachell Active Member

    Go with the original Konic, it will be more than sufficient for sea runs, humpies and most silvers. The only advantage to a large arbor reel is that it allows you to retrieve line faster when reeling, which can be important when fighting large quick fish especially with barbless hooks.
     
  17. Dipnet

    Dipnet aka Tim Hartman

    Yeah, the new and old spools seem interchangeable. A copy/paste from the clearance part of Pacific Fly Fishers: "These original Konic reels and spools are compatible with the new Konic II reels/spools."
     
  18. Dipnet

    Dipnet aka Tim Hartman

    Found the original Konic for under a c-note and lookin' forward to putting it on the Predator!

    And for being the most fashionable guy out there? Man, with a burgundy-and-black twill deer-stalker hat, a tie-dyed Grateful Dead shirt with a George Hamilton ascot tastefully wound 'round the neck and a pair of Dickies cut-off overalls and my UGG boots I expect to be on the cover of the fly-fishing edition of GQ pretty darned soon!!! :)
     
    Mark Mercer and Eyejuggler like this.
  19. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member


    This sounds like a fine candidate for a member of the Kitsap County beach gang
     
    Dipnet likes this.
  20. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

    Redington products, though distributed and supported through the Farbank center on Bainbridge are manufactured in Asia, China I believe. I own a few Redington rods and reels, but if you want hand made in WA you have to pay for a Sage.