March Brown Parachute SBS

Discussion in 'Fly Tying Step by Step' started by ScottP, Feb 7, 2013.

  1. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    Temporary home base established in the Cali desert - check. Tying stuff set up - check. Internet connection - check.
    Hoping to hit the hatch (skwalas, too) this spring when we get up to MT. Pretty basic 'chute; floats well, visible, easy to tie.


    hook - Dai Riki 320 #14
    thread - Danville 6/0 tan
    tail - hackle fibers grizzly dyed brown
    abdomen - biot tan
    thorax - dubbing tan
    wing - Congo Hair white
    hackle - grizzly dyed brown


    mash barb and attach thread at 75% mark (that'll be the reference mark for the wing tie-in)

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    wrap back to point above barb and create thread bump

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    pull off a clump of hackle fibers and even tips

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    measure (shank length) and tie in; wrap back to thread bump to force tail to proper tilt and splay angle

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    tie in biot (notch side down to create ribbed body)

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    wrap biot forward to initial tie-in; trim and smooth with thread wraps

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    tie in a clump of Congo Hair (or whatever you prefer) on top

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    and secure with a couple crossing wraps

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    pull wing up and post with thread wraps; apply a bit of Sally to post

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    prep hackle (upsize by 1) and tie in on post, shiny side out (fibers will "cup" up)

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    apply some dubbing

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    dub thorax and move thread back to base of post

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    wrap hackle down post (8 wraps from this feather) and let it hang down

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    trap hackle with wraps at base of post

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    half hitch x 2 and SHHAN; trim hackle tip

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    trim wing (hook shank length)

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    black wing (Grecian Formula Special) for poor light conditions

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    Regards,
    Scott
     
    Teenage Entomologist likes this.
  2. Joe Goodfellow

    Joe Goodfellow Active Member

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    Cali desert? Where at? If your in so-cal hit up the kern it has a skwalla hatch
     
  3. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    We're in Borrego Springs. Kern's about 280 miles but I was hoping to take a road trip up there and that just makes it more enticing.

    Regards,
    Scott
     
  4. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    Nice Scott. I like the way you tie in the wing post. Helps me not have a large lump at the backside of the post, which is great when tying small stuff! I like it! I presume Congo hair is a synthetic?
     
  5. Kenneth Yong

    Kenneth Yong Member

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    Scott, thanks much for this, great looking fly, and the photography's also top notch.

    Regards,
    Kenneth
     
  6. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    Larry,

    It is (polypropylene, I think). A cheaper alternative to EP Fibers, I get it from Flytyer's Dungeon; great assortment of colors, sheds water.

    Regards,
    Scott
     
  7. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    The pattern looks very similar to my MB dry fly. I tie my parachute hackle on differently otherwise, pretty much the same. I did give up on adding a tail. I found my pattern worked just as well without tail fibers so I save myself a step... remember my fly tying moto... less is more.

    I use antron fibers I make from carpet samples for the body. (I call it rug dubbing) The color is very close to that of the MBs in this part of Oregon. I do add a touch of olive when blending my dubbing. I noticed that the MBs in The Willamette Valley have a tint of olive when you look at the underside. The back is always dark brown but the belly is a much lighter tan color with a bit of olive.

    Either a light tan Compara-Dun or the parachute patten is the one that works the best for me in this part of the world. March is coming up, so Scott, your pattern is very timely. Nice photos.
     
  8. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    Gene,

    I think I got my lighting issues fixed, thanks to you. I'd love to see some pics of your March Brown.


    Regards,
    Scott
     
  9. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Scott, yup. You certainly corrected the lighting issue. Did you end up going with blue bulbs or something else?

    Here's my MB in all its simple glory -- three materials. It works quite well for me. I think the coarse, antron carpet fiber dubbing aids immensely in its flotation.

    IMG_1595.jpg

    I use the same dubbing for my tan Elk Hair Caddis pattern.

    Here's a bit of interesting facts in regards to the MB hatches in The Willamette Valley. The first March Browns to hatch are quite large-- size 8-10. As time goes on, the bugs reduce in size. Toward the end of the MB season, the duns are a size 14. This means a fat old Compara-Dun can work quite well during the beginning of the hatches but the parachute patterns work better later on.
     
  10. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    Gene,

    Probably makes the fly stain resistant and easy to clean, too :)
    Cool fly; beautiful in function and simplicity.
    I did order one of the blue bulbs you suggested and then my daughter told me all I needed to do was change the lighting setting on the camera to "fluorescent" - that seemed to do the trick. I'll hold onto the bulb just in case.

    Regards,
    Scott
     
  11. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Scott, if you ever decide to move up to a DSLR, the camera normally gives you multiple lighting adjustments. My Canon allows to me adjust the light from cool to warm with an adjustment wheel and it shows the color changes on the screen. Danged handy.

    Just about all my parachute patterns are simple. My parachute Adams is also three materials. It's tied the same as the MB but with a grey body and grizz hackle. It's my go-to fly in a size 18 when the trout are taking small flies off the surface. It doesn't seem to matter if mayflies or caddis are hatching. As long as the body of the natural bug is basically grey, it works. Again, I first tied the pattern with a tail but found the tail made no difference to the fish so I no longer include one.

    The most complicated parachute style pattern I tied is a size 18 parachute Royal Coachman. It's tricky to tie but works quite well if you can't match the hatch.
     
  12. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    chute.jpg
     
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