MF Snoqualmie Report

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by kbromer, Aug 4, 2008.

  1. troutingham

    troutingham Member

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    I would think the main stem above the falls is the place to go for the realy realy big ones. I think just that slight fluctuation in gradient and temperature would make all difference in food source and growth and then realize these fish travel up the forks to spawn. It's a great surprise to catch one and rare. Great streams, take care of them.
     
  2. CoastalCutt

    CoastalCutt Member

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    Awfully large dries like size 10 stimulators and the like always account for my bigger forks fish, and I usually like to fish the holes that I have found to contain these bigger trout right after a snorkel.
     
  3. Richard Olmstead

    Richard Olmstead BigDog

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    and now the real reason for doing those snorkel surveys!
     
  4. Xander

    Xander Member

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    I see how it is... use a fly that's too big for the dinks to get there mouth's around!! :rofl:
     
  5. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Xander, you've done a better job of squeezing out secrets from this crowd than anybody I can remember. We're gonna have to track you down and kill you now.

    Just kidding of course :rofl:

    K
     
  6. Brookie_Hunter

    Brookie_Hunter aka Dave Hoover

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    While I haven't caught anything especially large by the Forks standards mentioned in past threads, I have to agree with CoastalCutt that the largest fish that I've caught have been on big stimulator and caddis patterns.
     
  7. Stew McLeod

    Stew McLeod aka BigMac

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    Contrary to what has been said above, the largest fish I have caught on the forks have been with size 14-16 dries (Adams, BWO and such). Granted the largest I've caught have only been in the 14-16 inch variety but I do consider that large for the forks.
     
  8. CoastalCutt

    CoastalCutt Member

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    That is for sure large! Everyone has to keep in mind also that the S.F. and N.F. are under the 2 fish over 10" rule in the summer season. I have seen a lot of fish kept over 10"....and anything over ten inches on any fork in my opinion is a great fish. So I wonder if S.F. and N.F.fish would get a little more size if it were C&R also?

    The attachment was about a 13" Cutt. caught by my boss' son last night. It is in my opinion a great forks fish.
     
  9. Xander

    Xander Member

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    CoastalCutt, iagree

    That is a great fish for that water! And I also like the kid's T-shirt, showing some love for the Northeast with the Saranac Lake reference. That's a beautiful place and some nice, storied trout waters nearby as well. Worth a trip upstate if you have to go to NYC or environs. But I digress...

    What fly did he catch that guy on? Does it conform to your statement that 'bigger is better?'
     
  10. Xander

    Xander Member

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    I'll take that as a compliment! :clown:

    But, Kent, please see post following yours, whereby Stew proceeds to present differing evidence that contradicts the 'secrets' divulged by CoastalCutt and Brookie_Hunter re my question "What are you doing differently to catch those lunkers?" This goes to show that there is no 'easy answer.' So, indeed, I might be able to extract some info from the gang here, but they sure do a damn good job of keeping it nebulous enough to make me want to continue 'squeezing' for more! ptyd That's the fun of it after all- always trying to learn more to become a better fisherman!

    And btw I am quite wily, so you better be a good shot when you find me :cool:
     
  11. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    Xander, just keep in mind that all those spots you marked in your Gaz where the lunkers might live are terribly infested with rattlesnakes and ticks, and I've heard that a large sow has been teaching her cubs to forage nearby... just trying to keep my fellow fishermen safe. :D
     
  12. jcnewbie

    jcnewbie Member

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    Nice fishie!!

    ...Uhm, is the rod in the backgroung lying in the water with the butt section and reel completely submerged up over the cork? Or is that just a "perspective illusion?":eek:

    ....probably had been on that stick just above it and fell into the water while you were taking the picture....probably, huh?:hmmm:

    Just curious....!

    jcnewbie
     
  13. CoastalCutt

    CoastalCutt Member

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    Xander, that was on a 12 rubber legged stimi. Bigger is better. JC, my buddy is holding one rod, while there is one in the water also.
     
  14. jroni

    jroni Member

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    I had the pleasure of fishing the upper Cedar river in the closed section for the government who is doing some studies on the salmon in that section and the resident trout and their potential affect on the water quality. This section of the river has been closed for decades. The river is full of 6"-10" fish but not that many larger fish. The larger fish are mostly in the lower section of the river. I saw perfect hole after perfect hole that hadn't been fished in decades thinking I was going to pull lunkers out but mostly just little ones. The water is much like the Snoqualmie a bit too fast and sterile to support large fish. This is just the nature of Cascade streams. Also, the water comes from the bottom of the dam which tends to keep it very cool and not particularly productive for insects.
     
  15. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    I've fantasized about fishing the upper, off-limits reaches of the Cedar for years. I heard a similar story a few summers back by a City of Seattle biologist who confirmed what you stated about the Cedar below the dam. However, he said that there are MUCH larger fish in the reservoir itself and especially in the forks of the Cedar above the reservoir, where as I can only imagine, the fish have rarely if ever seen a fisherman.

    Sigh.

    K
     
  16. Mingo

    Mingo the Menehune stole my beer

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    Supposedly, some leviathan bulls swim in there too Kent..............hell, if most people knew what was swimming in Lake Youngs reservoir they'd shit themselves..........:rofl:
     
  17. blueridgefisher

    blueridgefisher New Member

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    Fished the Middle Fork and the South Fork of the Snoqualmie last week on my first ever trip to Washington. I caught over 30 fish in two days. Beautiful river, Beautiful mountains, beautiful fish. I really enjoyed myself. I'll be back soon. Until then I'll enjoy fishing close to home here in Maryland. Caught these two brook trout today near Thurmont.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The trout fishing around here is good, but the beauty of the Cascades will have a lasting impact on me. I feel the calling already.
     
  18. jasmillo

    jasmillo Member

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    In my homestate back east, the reservoir are off limits to any type of recreation- fishing, swimming, etc. As a kid we used to sneak and and fish them on occasion. Monsters on nearly every cast who were not picky. Mostly smallies but there were some big trout near feeder streams.

    Now that I am older I obviously to not partake. The fine is $250, plus these days your likely to get sniped by a department of homeland security officer since the reservoirs supply drinking water to some big metropolitan areas. It was amazing fun as a kid though
     
  19. Bob Martin

    Bob Martin Member

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    According to my 1958-59 Northwest Fishing Guide, all three forks of the Snoqualmie in those days were stocked with cutthroat and rainbow and the South Fork with EB at various times. The progeny of those initial plants are most likely still around. Also, as Kent mentioned, trout planted in various high lakes have migrated down the outlet streams into all the Snoqualmie forks just to add to the mix. Curiously, in 1947, grayling eggs were planted in the Middle Fork as an experiment.
     
  20. Jeff Peacock

    Jeff Peacock Member

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    I just have to tip my hat at the quality of the posts in this thread.
    I've been fly fishing for nearly 40 years, and a Western Wa resident for about 20. I had developed my own ideas and theories regarding the nature of the trout in W.Wa rivers, but several of the posts make great sense and really help to explain why the fish are generally on the smallish size realitive to other big rivers across the west, Ie;
    Steep gradients generally equal less opportunity for biomass buildup and hence fewer bugs in the water; water thats generally on the acidic side, and frequent heavy flooding due to high annual rainfall and historically poorly managed watersheds.
    It's a pleasure to have access to such rich understanding!

    I've been able to keep my Jones going on a couple of OP rivers I've found where I've been fortunate to consistently be able to tap bows in the 12-15" range and an occasonal big bull thrown in to keep things really exciting.

    I just had an office move to Auburn and will be spending a little more time exploring the Green. If anyone's up for an evening of fishing there this week drop me a PM, (especially if you've already got the Green dialed in :D.
     

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