Mukilteo

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Jeff_e_d, Jun 13, 2005.

  1. Jeff_e_d

    Jeff_e_d Member

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    After reading several good reports on this site, I gave it a try at the Mukilteo park just before dusk Sunday evening. Tide was coming in and I was fishing just before high tide. All I was getting was a bunch of sea weed on my line. Good to get out but not much going on.
     
  2. Steve Rohrbach

    Steve Rohrbach Puget Sound Fly Fisher

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    The beach at Mukilteo should fish well later this summer when the Pinks start to arrive. I caught and released about a dozen there two years ago over several early mornings fishing. It is blind casting but when you hook up you will have some fun. There are usually lots of buzz bombers up by the boat launch. I work my south down the beach. Good fishing, Steve
     
  3. Jeff_e_d

    Jeff_e_d Member

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    Thanks Steve. I was looking for SRC's and didn't see a lot a bait acitivity.
     
  4. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    Jeff, I usually try to avoid the public parks in the evening to avoid the mass of stick and rock throwers and stand right behind you to see what you're doing people, in favor of the early mornings. Some folks never will get it that you're throwing a high speed impaler of flesh 40 ft behind you. You will generally avoid the buzz bombers too.

    Also, I try to avoid high tide because of all the salad that gets shifted around in the water at that time. Move to Howarth park or one of the other parks along the waterfront; try hitting 2 hours before or after a low tide, or earlier than just before high tide when the sea weeds from the beach all get picked up and start moving with the tidal current.
     
  5. Jeff_e_d

    Jeff_e_d Member

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    Good point salt dog about casting with folks behind you. You're right on about that beach being filled up with people.
     
  6. Steve Rohrbach

    Steve Rohrbach Puget Sound Fly Fisher

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    Jeff, Salt Dog is absolutely right. I always fish there at 0:Dark Thirty. As the morning progresses you need to start watching the beach behind you because people will walk right up into your back cast. I have politely asked several people if they wouldn't mind moving down the beach instead of throwing rocks at my fly and decided that arguing "it's a public beach" isn't worth it. There is a lot to be said about getting away from the public beaches. Steve :mad:
     
  7. Ken Hunter

    Ken Hunter Member

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    All you need to do for any city beach is find a light mist coming from the sky. That will be the end of all other foot traffic. Anything before 10 am on such a day and the gate may still be locked.

    Mukilteo is a great place to find such conditions.
     
  8. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    Ken, I know what you mean about locked gates; few things are as bothersome, and in need of efficient means of getting around, than locked gates for public parks.

    However, by 10 am I am usually calling it a day unless it is one of those special days were the reel is still singing. I feel that low light is a significant factor for fishing from the beaches for SRC or Salmon, and can be as large a factor as tide movement, so I am usually on the beach at near first light.

    I do fish the late afternoon/evening fish, but mostly when the salmon are in. Then it is worth the trouble of dealing with retrieving dogs, stone throwers, gawkers, and strollers oblivious to sub-sonic missiles hurling near their heads. But I certainly agree that poor weather usually clears the beach nicely.