Need help with carp catching

Discussion in 'Warm Water Species' started by Kaiserman, Jul 24, 2011.

  1. Kaiserman content

    Posts: 2,612
    Ratings: +420 / 0
    I've found a place, where believe it or not, the carp are not that easily spooked. I've waited for the "tail tip", presented my fly, even twitched it a couple times. Changed flies twice, had only one maybe two takes (missed both) - spoked 'em - gone.

    I think I had one chase a crawdad pattern in, hooked briefly right in front of me, then came off. It was just after sunset so I don't know if it was a monster brown or a carp. I'm thinking carp....cause DAM that fish was HUGE!

    The water I'm fishing is a small river that runs slow and clear, so getting the fly in the exact spot (and timing) is tough.

    Should I just toss a fly, let it sit, then twitch it when they come by?

    I WANT TO BE A MEMBER OF THE CARP CLUB SO BAD!!! All I'm catching is trout in the upper teens (which is of some condolence I guess).

    Should I stick with it? Stay with the crawdad pattern at dusk, or something small at mid day? Can you cast upstream and "swing" it to where they are feeding?

    Please help put me out of my misery....
  2. Upton O Blind hog fisherman

    Posts: 2,158
    out of state now
    Ratings: +211 / 0
    Times have sure changed...

    Great report though, fun read.
  3. speyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 1,056
    State of Jefferson U.S.A.
    Ratings: +136 / 3
    Suggest "Carp on the Fly" by Reynolds, Befus & Berryman. A must have full of info on the subject. Also, hooks must be very sharp in order to penetrate those gummy lips! Presentation is of utmost importance. Under no circumstance strip the fly towards the fish. Prey never attacks the predator!
  4. Gary Thompson dirty dog

    Posts: 3,891
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +131 / 0
    I've never caught a carp on a fly either and I want to "BAD"
    Getting the fly in the right spot, knowing the take and setting the hook, just hasn't come together.
    I was using scuds and they always checked it out and I think picked it up I just couldn't set the hook before they spit it back out.
    practice, practice, practice
  5. miyawaki Active Member

    Posts: 3,213
    Kent, Washington, USA.
    Ratings: +839 / 1
    I'm no expert but I went out to the carpon flats yesterday for the first time and I sighted, cast and landed a 5 pounder. The fly I was given to use worked on the first fish only. After that, it was refused. I was told to expect that particular behaviour. They are smarter than we think. They talk to each other!

    Leland.
  6. Upton O Blind hog fisherman

    Posts: 2,158
    out of state now
    Ratings: +211 / 0
    Ah, Leland, you diverted everyone to LP while you snuck off to the carp flats. Sneaky guy.
  7. Gary Thompson dirty dog

    Posts: 3,891
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +131 / 0
    True that "they talk to each other"
  8. Joe Smolt Member

    Posts: 532
    Bothell, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +9 / 0
    Just came back from a business trip to St Paul. Fishing destination..No. But I have a coworker there who is really into pursuing carp with a fly rod and he took me to one of his spots and shared some of his experience. We mainly were sight casting, but I was not against some blind fishing too.

    His guidance was:
    1) spot feeding fish (not necessarily sunning or cruising). See them mucking the botttom or tailing or look for bubbles
    2) Figure the direction of feeding
    3) Get the cast within 2 feet preferably 1 foot from the fish without lining them. Try to put the fly ahead of the feeding direction or just to the side of the head of the fish.
    4) If going to move the fly away from the fish, start with significant movement. to get the fish's attention. In some cases, he moved the fly faster than I expected (vs how I was coached for true bonefish)
    5) If followed, keep retrieving and look for the fish to dip. Wait 1 sec and strike. Fish will quickly spit out the imitation, so timing is everything. Thats why blind fishing can be challenging unless you use a fairly rapid retrieve.
    6) He believes the retrieves can vary based on the size of the fly. Fish will accept a faster retrieve for a bigger fly. He has even caught carp with a clouser minnow. He has been able to take fish while retrieving in the middle of the water column. Sometimes this is dictated by the weeds. So don't be afraid to try different retrieve styles.

    Luckily, he took me to a place with a lot of fish and a lot of shots at fish. Having so many shots, you see that you can have a lot of good presentations without follows. You can see how skiddish they are, whether you see them spook and swim off, or they shut down and stop traveling that area. I botched many casts lining and spooking them off.

    Its addictive. Fun to spot. Challenge to stalk without being spotted. Challenge to present the fly close without spooking. Tough to decide when to strike. In MN, really tough to cast with trees and dense vegetation. Too often I spotted fish within 10 ft, and damn it if I can't roll cast just a leader accurately. I really think this is a short game. When you spot them, they can be close. Makes me wonder about overlining the rod to enable fast casts without much line out of the tip. My coworker would fish a relatively short leader so as to have the line out of the tip for that quick cast.

    Fly type didnt seem to matter much. I fished large nymphs. He fished simple fly of chennile body, bead eyes and rabbit fur tail of contrasting colors. Something that would jig with an ungulating tail. We got 4 fish in a few hours.

    Probably nothing here you didn't know. My take home from the trip is a sense of try different retrieves than you think.

    joe
  9. speyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 1,056
    State of Jefferson U.S.A.
    Ratings: +136 / 3
    I had a friend who got to fishing small scuds on really long leaders, 12 to 18 ft. I preferred to stay with shorter leaders, in the 9 ft range. They are where you find them. Sometimes back in the reeds, and they will not come out. So you have to put the fly back into cuts where they feel safe. You lose flies to bad casts. Just break them off rather than going back there to get your fly and spooking them out of there. I once saw one lone fish cruising/feeding along the bank some 70 ft away. Made the cast, and he took it. At that distance, kind of a Zen thing for seeing/feeling the take. Another time I spotted those rubber lips working under an algae bed. Put on a sloppy excuse for a green wholly bugger, tied up with marabou. I got lucky, was able to judge his direction and cruising speed. Again kind of a Zen thing about sensing the take. But when he felt the hook, and the line came tight, algae went flying everywhere.
  10. Rick Todd Active Member

    Posts: 1,861
    Ferndale/Winthrop
    Ratings: +237 / 0
    Leland-you were at our club last night and not a work about carp! Now that would have been an interesting side note! Was the shop rat with you when you caught it? Rick
  11. miyawaki Active Member

    Posts: 3,213
    Kent, Washington, USA.
    Ratings: +839 / 1
    No, I was out with Dave Williams, a renowned and feared man on the carpon flats.

    Leland.