NFR: In-situ Chainsaw Art

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Jim Wallace, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Could this be a new trend? " IMGP1681.jpg Discovered" on the beach just south of Westhaven Sate Park, this was just a burnt stump last week. I took this shot yesterday afternoon.
    Methinks its the work of a local chainsaw artist who was out hunting for pieces of driftwood. I suppose that this stump was too big for his truck, so he had at it right there, and left it for us to enjoy!

    edit: I found out that the name of the artist is Tony Robinson.
     
    Dan Nelson and Patrick Gould like this.
  2. GAT

    GAT Active Member

    It means some guy is carrying around a chainsaw.... and probably wearing a hockey mask.
     
    Jim Wallace and Olive bugger like this.
  3. Patrick Gould

    Patrick Gould Active Member

    I always like to come upon a piece of guerrilla art
     
    constructeur likes this.
  4. Rick Todd

    Rick Todd Active Member

    Speaking of chainsaw art, I just had a big pine tree cut down over at my Winthrop place. Had the tree guy leave a 6' tall stump thinking it would make a cool trout sculpture. Anyone know a chainsaw artist in the Methow area? BTW-that is a really cool work of art! Rick
     
  5. Scott Salzer

    Scott Salzer previously micro brew

    Rick:

    You know my guy that did the spirit face in our tree is way too far from The Methow.

    Take a look at www.loggerrodeo.com, it is Sedro Woolley.

    They have a contest and their site has a list of carvers.
     
  6. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

    Since it on the beach, I wonder how long it will be before somebody cuts it up for fire wood.
     
  7. GAT

    GAT Active Member

    I'm not so sure you can do something like that on an Oregon beach without authorization. I know you can't show up with a front loader and start removing large pieces of driftwood without approval from the powers that be..


    State Park Beaches
    The taking of driftwood in small amounts by visitors for souvenirs, for personal use or as gifts is permitted. The removal of large amounts of driftwood, or any wood with mechanized loading equipment, shall be prohibited except as approved by the park manager. Chainsaws must be approved by the park manager. No wood shall be removed which is embedded in the beach or in sand dune banks.

    Under no circumstance shell a person be allowed on the beach with an operational chainsaw while wearing a hockey goalie mask.
     
  8. GAT

    GAT Active Member

    I assume everyone figured out the last sentence was a joke. More or less...
     
  9. jessejames

    jessejames Flyslinger

    Under no circumstance shell a person be allowed on the beach with an operational chainsaw while wearing a hockey goalie mask. [/quote]
    Yeah right and when you see this guy are you going to be the one to tell him the rules???
     
  10. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    I think that this piece of wood is safe for now. If it hadn't been transformed into such a fine specimen of beach art, for sure it would have been cut up and removed.
    There's a crew of hard core beach wood gatherers out here. Some are just looking for firewood, or the occasional landscape piece. Others are driftwood artists and chainsaw carvers.
    I walk the beaches here regularly, and the same guys are out scouting in their trucks or on foot early nearly every day, checking to see what washed in overnight. Some of 'em head right out after high tide during the night hours, using floodlights to scan the tide line. The "best" pieces get taken first, and then it eventually gets picked down to what is of little artistic or heating value.
    If it wasn't for those guys, our beaches would all be covered with drift logs, slowing down any beach erosion.
     
  11. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

    I found this piece of art on a beach a couple years ago: :D
    beach art 1.jpg
     
  12. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

    Bump, to credit the artist.
    An article about the bull carving appeared in the local rag, "The Beach Bulletin," and I learned that the name of the artist is Tony Robinson. He's a local carver, and he sells some of his work.