noob who needs raft help

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by sharpshooter223, Oct 5, 2007.

  1. sharpshooter223 Member

    Posts: 486
    richland/pullman, wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    i just got into fly fishing this past summer and next summer me and my dad are planning on making a high lake trip to the snow lakes area just south of leavenworth. the main thing right now is that all we have is a float tube. we dont want to use this because we dont want to get that wet in such a high altitude place. so i am looking around for inflatable rafts or backpackable pontoon rafts. i have about 300-400 to spend at most so im after beginners line stuff. i saw a backpackable pontoon boat on cabelas called the arrow and i was wondering how well that would work out. also i was wondering how good a sevyeller fish hunter raft would work. why last question is does anybody know what kind of access permits are required for the leavenworth area snow lakes specifically. i have done quite a bit of spin fishing and decided to take up fly fishing also and will need a raft or pontoon boat anyway, just dont have much money to spend for it.
  2. Salmo_g Active Member

    Posts: 7,572
    Your City ,State
    Ratings: +1,702 / 0
    The Curtis ultralight backpacking raft has been discontinued, but that Sevlor at about 3.5 or is it 6 pounds is probably as good as your going to find (~$75) short of an Alpaca which is also around 6 pounds, but it's bulletproof price is between $700 and $800.
  3. sharpshooter223 Member

    Posts: 486
    richland/pullman, wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    what do you think about backpackable pontoon boats/rafts. i dont want a small raft made to only seat 1 person. i saw the fish hunter inflated at the store made for 3 people and looked good for seating 1 person fishing.
  4. Bob Martin Member

    Posts: 145
    Woodinville, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Most high lakes can be effectively fished from shore. You really don't need a tube or raft. I have a raft but rarely use it because of the excess weight and the time it takes to inflate, deflate etc. However, there are some cliffy, brushy, or large mountain lakes where it would be an advantage to have one.
  5. PhlyPhisher New Member

    Posts: 85
    shoreline WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Maybe I missed something here in your message. What's the deal about not wanting to get a float tube wet in a high altitude? What difference does that make? :hmmm:
    Regarding your other questions... I don't think you're going to get much for 3-400 dollars that'll give you any sort of use and/or take any abuse. In my opinion, you'd be better off saving your money until you can buy something of higher quality. I agree with Bob Martin that you can fish most of the lakes from shore. (That's where fish will tend to congregate most of the time anyway.
    As far as special permits, rules and regulations... I don't think there are any for the lakes you're referring to. But I could be wrong. Check your Wash. State Fishing Regulations pamphlet that you should have picked up when you bought your license.
  6. sharpshooter223 Member

    Posts: 486
    richland/pullman, wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    and those are the lakes that i would need it for, but also i am planning on getting something for lowland lakes and i figure it would be nice to have something for high lakes, im not sure how easy it would be to cast out of a sevylor fish hunter raft which is why i was thinking of getting a pontoon boat so i am higher out of the water. would the sevylor fish hunter rafts be strong enough to put a sleeping cushion or whatever liek that on the floor of it and put a small chair in, or even place a board over the top so i could sit higher out of the water. also would it be worth it to get a 20-30 dollar raft and just replace it as it wears out cause they are fairly lightweight. its not that i dont want to get a float tube wet, its that i dont want to get wet from sitting in the water. i think a pontoon boatthat costs 250-350 should be able to take quite a bit of use, i dont plan on hitting it as hard as i can against sharp rocks and knives, i just plan on using it for fishing. the fishing regs dont acctually list snow lakes, but on one of the game departments fact sheets it list snow lakes as holding trout and it says "Limited entry area-wilderness use permit required"
  7. Mr.E He called me an Elitist ?? LOL ..what a moron

    Posts: 688
    Lakewood,Wa.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    So if you have a float tube already just buy a decent set of waders so you don't get wet.:confused:
  8. sharpshooter223 Member

    Posts: 486
    richland/pullman, wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    well i already have waders that i use for duck hunting, but those would be too heavy for hauling up a mountain. also i dont like a float tube because its low to the water and i already cast bad enough as is, as a noob i could use as much casting room as i can get. would securing a wood board of some sort across the top of a raft as a way to place a seat on the raft be to unstable?
  9. Old Man Just an Old Man

    Posts: 21,785
    Dillon, Mt
    Ratings: +1,722 / 0
    It depends how big you are. But you can get float tubes that will hold you out of the water. And a good pair of breathables will keep you dry and warm if you wear fleece under them. The name of them escapes me for the moment.

    Jim
  10. Mr.E He called me an Elitist ?? LOL ..what a moron

    Posts: 688
    Lakewood,Wa.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Sharpshooter, you may want to re-think what you are wanting. Please take this from a noob that has been doing this for many a years.( 5yrs of fly fishing and I still consider my self a noob.)

    I was once like you. I had terrible casting and would buy every gadget out there (Float tubes/backpack pontoons and modify the platform to sit higher of the water) to try and compensate for the lack of skill to cast and offer them fish a good presentation. Now alot of them sit idle in my garage collecting dust.:hmmm:

    Packing in collapsible flotation devises plus your normal camping stuff are heavy and cumbersome. I used to find myself to tired to fish when setting in base camps.

    I would suggest to you to fix your first problem(s).
    1. Casting: Take casting instructions!

    2. Light Weight Waders: Keeps you dry and are easy to pack in and out.

    3. A longer rod: 9'6" - 10'

    I fish out of Kayaks most of the time and it takes allot of practice/practice/practice to form good casting techniques.

    Once you fix them, you'll find more enjoyment out of this sport.
  11. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Yes.
  12. billkendrick831@msn.com Northsounder

    Posts: 94
    Bellingham,WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I agree with Roy,I've been fishing out of kayaks for years but when I went to fulltime flyfishing it was a different ballgame.Tightening up your casting stroke is essential whenyou use a fishing platform that you are inside.Anything cheaper than the fishhunter models and you are probaly doing yourself a disservice.I used a fishunter as a dinghy of sorts on a bigger boat I had and it proved fairly durable.I would say Sevylors are your entry level and go up from there.Good Luck.
  13. Snake tryin' not to get too comfortable

    Posts: 621
    between the mountains and the sound
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    The whole raft vs. float tube vs. nothing for high lakes has been hashed out numerous times on the board. Here's one thread: http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/board/showthread.php?t=41303

    Semi-related to your question:

    Are you dead-set on the Snow Lakes? The Enchantments get HEAVY use (hence the requirement for a permit, which can be hard to get), and the fishing isn't that good (IMHO). Just a thought.......

    Here's the link for the permits for that area (for 2007, but it's probably not going to change in 2008):http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/wenatchee/passes/enchantments/
  14. sharpshooter223 Member

    Posts: 486
    richland/pullman, wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    where would be a good high lake place to fish that you can camp by, has good fishing, you cant drive to so that there are less people there, and isnt huge so that i can manage the entire lake by pontoon boat or raft.
  15. Bob Martin Member

    Posts: 145
    Woodinville, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Sharpshooter, I recommend you call or visit a USFS ranger district in the area you wish to hike and fish. Explain to them the kind of trip you're planning. They can be a source of much helpful advice and general information about trails, equipment needed, camping, fishing, mosquitoes, problem bears, trailhead break-ins, on and on.
    If you would like more specific information about latest fish plants etc., call the WDFW office.
    You might want to choose an area with several lakes. Then if one is not fishing well you can move to another. You'll have fun whether you take a tube/raft or not.
  16. sharpshooter223 Member

    Posts: 486
    richland/pullman, wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    my german club is making a trip to leavenworth in december so i plan on finding out what i can then, but for now i am wondering what you guys would suggest for a beginner, i would prefer to be fishing right about the middle of east and west in the cascades, north or south. i guess mid cascades on the west side works also. maybe i should start a new thread for this?
  17. Allison Banned or Parked

    Posts: 829
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Now that Curtis Rafts have been discoed, there's nothing really feasable boatwise for carrying in with backpack gear. Learn how to cast so that your backcasts don't get gobbled by brush and go for it.

    As far as high lakes that have fish in them, look on your maps for spots of blue, and there's a pretty good chance there will be fish in them. The quality of the fishery varies by a number of factors.