nothin' doin' nothin'...

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by mr trout, Dec 13, 2005.

  1. mr trout

    mr trout Trevor Hutton

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    So I think I quit. I have been out a bunch of times, got fish once, and got cold the rest of the times. Beach fishing is just too hit or miss for me. I feel like the fish can be anywhere along thousands of miles of shoreline, and being restricted to where a bus and my bike can get me puts even more of a limit on things. If the fish aren't there, they could be anywhere, it isn't like fishing rivers (or even lakes) where there are general places one can expect to find fish. With the salt water, there is just soooo much water that it seems hopeless. You show up, no riseforms, splashes jumps, nothin. So you cast aimlessly hoping that something might just swim by where your fly happens to be. I might as well go drown a worm under a bobber at green lake or something, the odds seem about the same to me. The most fun I had today was getting a crab to pinch my clouser... Of course, in a few days, I'll cheer up and then want to try it again...and not catch anything. This Stinks.bawling: bawling: :beathead:
     
  2. TomB

    TomB Active Member

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    I wish every angler had your attitude and didn't try to learn how to predict where the fish will be. That way I wouldn't ever come to a beach with tons of fish and see people.
    -Tom
    keep thinkin that.
     
  3. Willie Bodger

    Willie Bodger Still, nothing clever to say...

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    Trevor, you just need to go kick around Lone Lake for a while, that'll get you some fish...
     
  4. mr trout

    mr trout Trevor Hutton

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    Dang...no sympathy here! Anyway, I am not getting down on the sport itself, I think finding them is most of the challenge. But how do you go about predicting where they are? I guess having fished small ponds and streams mostly, I am just getting overwhelmed by the vastness of things out in the salt water. How long do you stay in one spot not catching anything before you pack it up for the day? Even water that looks good doesn't always hold fish, and along hundreds of miles of shoreline, there are lots of places for fish to be...so where do you even start? I can see how having a boat would be a huge advantage, so you could check out a number of different spots if you found things to be slow at one location. Any tips?
     
  5. TomB

    TomB Active Member

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    yeah...looking back my post was pretty harsh...the ability to predict comes from several things:
    -reading- read Les Johnson's book on coastal cutthroat, greg's article on this site, and anything else you can find
    -keeping a fishing journal so you can remember where you caught them
    -watch other anglers
    -check the tide and light conditions

    -Tom
     
  6. Willie Bodger

    Willie Bodger Still, nothing clever to say...

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    And, of course, if it's a new place you look for the subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) changes in the water surface hinting to you that there is some structure or tidal collision happening around there, either of which are a more likely place for them little fishies to find food. I like points as well. Not necessarily off the end, but around the edges and if you can look at a computer before you go, check out the satellite pics to find where there are troughs...

    willie
     
  7. hikepat

    hikepat Patrick

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    Just remember if the Salmon or Cuttroat will not come out to play its not to hard to go slow and deep for flounder and sculpin you know. They may not be a high and mighty fish but it gets the skunk off you.
     
  8. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    "I might as well go drown a worm under a bobber at green lake or something, the odds seem about the same to me. "

    Actually the odds at green lake would be much higher...

    But that aside, I understand your delima. I get that feeling whenever learning a new type of water. The bigger the water, the more intimidated I feel. I grew up fishing small rivers and streams where I could quickly identify holding water, have high confidence my presentation is getting looks from fish, and have pretty consistent and usually pretty darned good results. As the water gets bigger, I just start to lose confidence. But I love a challenge, and know it is just a matter of time, trial and error, paying attention to details, research, timing, experience, etc before things start falling in place.

    One word of advice - don't race all around the sound from beach to beach blindly hoping to stumble upon some fish. Pick a beach or 2 you know produce, then learn all you can about them. Learn the tides, where the fish feed (where the bait is), time of day, part of tide, patterns, presentations, etc. Once you build your confidence by picking apart and becoming an 'expert' on your 'home beach' (applies to rivers and lakes too), it will be easier to tackle a new beach and greatly decrease your learning curve.
     
  9. Dizane

    Dizane Coast to Coast

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    Break it down into areas that you can manage. The Sound may seem vast, and it kinda is, but you're never gonna be able to cast out to the middle of it...so don't worry about it! Focus on one boulder on the beach, one log on the beach, one gravel bar or depression in the beach at a time. Basically focus on anything that might hold bait or fish. Oh, and keep a log book so that when you do find the times, tides, and conditions that the beach you're on holds fish you'll remember it.

    Dane
     
  10. TomB

    TomB Active Member

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    if you are coming from seattle (or I-90 since i see it says you are from yakima) a good morning trip that most shops will advise, which lets you search a bit, is to drive across the narrows bridge and fish the narrows at docs, if there are no fish, continue to purdy, if there are no fish head north on the peninsula and fish the beach south of the ferry terminal at southworth before taking the ferry back to seattle.
    -Tom
     
  11. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    Trevor, hope springs eternal. Of course having to get around by bus makes it all the more difficult. To that, you do have my sympathy. bawling: The rest is just paying dues my friend and while whining is allowed, don't expect more than chuckles and head shaking from those that have already paid the dues (and continue to do so). If it was easy, everybody would be doing it, eh?

    You will find that getting skunked is going to happen a certain percentage of the time on the Sound, especially when fishing from the beach. You will also find that as you come to learn a certain location, see it at different times of day and different tides, your skunk percentage will decline rapidly. Follow the advice of Tom, Willie, Chad etc., above, and you will go up the learning curve.

    It is easy to be overwhelmed by the vastness of it all. Just like getting on a large river the first time after fishing streams. Like Dane said, break it into manageable size units. Frequently, the areas fish much the same as rivers. Fish like to hang out on seams, and around structure in rivers, same with the P.Sound: focus on the areas with cover, protection from fast current, and areas that food is condensed for easy feeding. As the current passes around a point, you definitely get current seams showing. If you are on a point, probably the area on either side of the point is acting like very large eddies, and will have counter currents.

    Best thing you can do is accept the learning curve, go out for a 1/2 day of learning the water and casting practice; see the structure and bottom contours that are revealed only at minus tide. Fish the 2 hours before and after a low tide, check out the same for a high tide at the same beach; then see the same at different times of day. IMHO, in many places, the single biggest factor is to get there early and fish at first light, regardless of tide.

    When I go to a new beach for the first time, I mostly expect to get skunked unless I luck out, and see fish rising or just happen to catch it just right, which is all a bonus: I go down to new water to take a time out, practice casting a bit, see a sunrise from a new beach. Maybe I'll get lucky, maybe not. For sure though, you won't be turning up you nose when somebody else reports excitedly that they caught a couple of 10"-12" sea runs. Like hikepat says, when you've just got to have that tug on the rod, go deep and slow: both sculpins and flounder put on a pretty decent fight, just to take the skunk off of a trip. By April, with the Searuns are again spreading out along all the beaches, and the resident coho are getting larger, you will feel some confidence, like you know what you are doing.
     
  12. mr trout

    mr trout Trevor Hutton

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    Dang it guys, just when I think I have one less type of fishing to worry about, you go and say smart crap to make me want to cowboy up and do better...:thumb: :p :beathead:

    Thanks...I guess...maybe.
     
  13. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

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    There is some great advice on this thread. Fishing the beaches is indeed not a pat hand, which is really the beauty of it. I'd rather prospect for cutthroat or salmon and hope to catch a few rather than pound trout at Rattlesnake Lake (example only). This extended cold spell has not made it any easier. However, we are fortunate to have all of this shoreline, much of which we can access. There is a lot to learn to become a successful saltwater fly fisher, which is why our beaches remain reasonably uncrowded. Many folks prefer an easier approach to catching fish. Keep in mind though; one tide that garners several hookups will wash away many days of skunks.
    Good Fishing,
    Les Johnson