Now all I need is a green drake hatch

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Pat Lat, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    Ive been playing with emerger patterns a lot lately, this one is easy enough to tie and I think it will actually fish well, The only problem is I don't know anywhere around here besides the yak that has a green drake hatch, and from what I've read that is sporadic and hard to pinpoint since its limited to only certain sections of the river.
    I guess Ill have to adapt it for smaller more abundant species of mayflies that are common around here.

    IMG_4922.JPG
     
  2. NewTyer1

    NewTyer1 Banned or Parked

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    Wow, that is awesome.
     
  3. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Great looking fly! There is a small, sporadic green drake hatch on parts of the Cedar. I found some of the nymphs last summer when flipping rocks. And green drake nymph imitations got eaten like crazy.
     
  4. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    I have yet to find a nymph pattern that successfully imitates a Green Drake... and it certainly isn't for not trying. The Met has a heck of a Green Drake hatch but nothing I've tried subsurface to mimic the bug has worked. That is a very interesting pattern, you should do a SBS for that one.
     
  5. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    Well I would think a big green hares ear would do the trick, but I guess what you mean is that the fly would have to convince you that it is a green drake. I'll try to work something up. As for the SBS, I'll get working on it pronto.
     
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Actually, I tried large, olive colored HE with no luck. The Stove Pipe, once very popular for use on The Met, was evidently supposed to represent a Green Drake nymph and it did work, but only for the planters. The wild trout ignored it. I've yet to learn of a Green Drake nymph pattern that works to catch the wild trout on the river. Adults, no problem, the wild trout will fall for those... and nothing fancy. A large, olive colored Compara-Dun is usually all it takes.

    A lot of folks swear by the foam, extended body Green Drake adult pattern originated by Richard Bunse but it takes 11 steps to tie so I don't bother with that one.
     
  7. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    Pat, very nice tie

    I hear Silver Creek has a nice Green Drake hatch and BIG brown trout
     
  8. Patrick Gould

    Patrick Gould Active Member

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    Great tie Pat! Last summer I was staying at the in laws time share on Chelan. One evening there were about a dozen large green mayflies on or around the porch.
     
  9. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    Thanks for the good info guys, Ive always seen the flies in shops but never witnessed a green drake hatch in person. When I look on the web pretty much everywhere just says hatches are sporadic and its more of a treat than something that happens on the regular. That being said, I wouldnt want to be caught in the middle of a hatch with no flies to imitate, so I'll keep a few of these in a corner of my box for that special occasion.
    Maybe I'll have Derek guide me into some next spring on the yak.
     
  10. Steve Vaughn

    Steve Vaughn Member

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    Pat,
    Really nice tie. What is the wing material?
     
  11. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    swiss straw, it looks better dry than it does wet. It tends to crumple up when wet so I use double to make sure it still has a good profile. For this one I used two of each, olive and yellow.
     
  12. coastal cutthroat

    coastal cutthroat Member

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    Hey Pat,
    Amazing tie (dare I say as usual).
    Try the Metolius (1st 1/2 of June). It's not heavy, and doesn't last that long, but when you catch it it is pretty amazing.
     
  13. Truckeetroutbum

    Truckeetroutbum New Member

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    Last June we had an amazing drake hatch and i got my biggest rainbow of the year on an emerger. We have a ton of GD nymphs. Both the small Flavilinea and larger Grandis. The big ones are actually alot more grey than green, and the smaller ones have a reddish olive tint. atleast to my eyes. That fly looks nice... Id be interested to see how it cast and fished... is it meant to sink into the film the way you displayed it? I hope you find a hatch and get to fish it... IMO it doesnt matter if there hatching or not, if your fishing a river with them in it, fishing a green drake during there emergence period is a safe bet. Yes, when they are really going off it is a dream come true and it seems like every fish in the river goes dumb for them. But at the same time, I have always done well with them regardless of it being sparse. The bottom line is that its a big meal, only available for about a month out of the year. Ive done pretty well swinging emergers up off the bottom aswell. I think the green drake is a species that breaks out of the husk underwater before or during the ascend to the surface. (correct me if im wrong.)
     
  14. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    You got that right! It is a short hatch but the larger, wild trout go crazy for the big, green bugs.
     
  15. Richard Olmstead

    Richard Olmstead BigDog

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    I think many/most clean cold streams in the west have green drakes. In my (limited) experience with them, they tend to emerge in early summer, often while flows are still quite high (previous comments about June; early July in northern Idaho streams). Combine this with what others have said about the hatches often being sporadic and of short duration and it is a bug relatively few fishermen encounter, unless they are out looking for them, which is worth doing, because there are few other bugs that fish take so willingly.

    Also, as I noted in the thread on the Lochsa Special, because trout love 'em so, they will often take green drake imitations well after the hatches are over.

    D
     

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