Nymph Fishing

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by rlight, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. rlight

    rlight Member

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    Greetings,

    I am new to nymph fishing in lakes. I would like your thoughts on some of the best nymph patterns for lakes such as Squalicum, Padden, etc. Also, I would like your input on good soft hackle patterns for lakes.

    Thanks I appreciate your help.
    rlight
     
  2. pfournier

    pfournier Do it outside!

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    If its shallow, an 18-24 beaded hares ear under an indicator works like a charm. If shallow like Leach Lake, just 10 inches or so below the surface is all you need.

    Hang on time to your rod <-- pun intended.

    Pheasant tail works great to. I don't think it has to be all that complicated.
     
  3. cabezon

    cabezon Sculpin Enterprises

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    My top two choices for lake nymphs on the west side are a convincing damsel imitation and a black bead-head hare's ear nymph, occasionally tied with a flash back option. I will often use them in tandem, with damsel as the trailer.

    Steve
     
  4. pfournier

    pfournier Do it outside!

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    OMG, I almost forgot my damsel nymph. Or event that it counts as a nymph. It is my go to fly trolled around the lake. Good way to prospect for fish and pump the menu. Then plan your day from there :)
     
  5. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    Damsel, Chironimid, Hairs Ear, Scud. These four patterns will keep you in fish 97% of the time. For these patterns as well as soft hackles think in the following colors, black, brown, green, peacock. Just dream up your own variations and profiles. It's hard to go wrong.

    TC
     
  6. Keaten LaBrel

    Keaten LaBrel Formerly Tyinbugs

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    My fav. lake nymphs include
    1. green roll-over scud #16-20
    2. silver lightning bug #16-20
    3. ice cream cone #16-18
    4. any kind of damsel nymph #8-12
    5. zug bug #14-18
    6. water boatmen #12-14

    soft hackles
    1. brown bear brown (tough to find, old woven patt.) #10-16
    2. hare's ear s.h. #14-18
    3. delek. orange juice #16-18
    4. s.h. scud in olive #14-20

    my overall favorite lake pattern is the articulated m.o.a.l. leech in black....hope this helps a little!
     
  7. rlight

    rlight Member

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    Thanks for all the imput.
    So, if you have the correct pattern would you recommend using a floating line with a long leader? What about strike indicators? Or would adding a sink tip section to the floating line be the way to go?

    rlight
     
  8. Keaten LaBrel

    Keaten LaBrel Formerly Tyinbugs

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    depends on when and where! if you are fishing somewhat close to the banks (which is usually the way to go with nymphin) i use a long leader...as for the indicator, i don't use them on lakes b/c most of the time you'll catch fish is on the downfall (sinking) of the bug, twitching it off the bottom, or stripping your bug in. I use a full sink or a sink-tip when i'm trolling with a leech or bugger and using (usually a scud) as a dropper!
     
  9. golfman65

    golfman65 Guest

    I don't think I've ever nymphed stillwater really, I'll cast and slow strip nymphs..as you want some motion on them..If your using an indicator only three flies I use, chronies, micro leech and scuds...and the scuds I'll twitch it really slow...

    Now rivers are a different matter and yes I nymph them quite a bit with stones, p.t.s' etc.

    Sounds like your around the b'ham area...Squalicum doesn't work too hot with an indicator..it's way shallow, though I have tried and gotten the odd fish...I've done allot better on slow stripping then anything, damsels, carrey specials in the spring, micro leeches at times...wait till twilight and fish dries...small alexandra's etc. work too earlier in the season and you might hook up a tiger with one...
     
  10. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    Fishing a nymph in a lake is like watching cement dry. This is one thing I don't have patience for.

    Jim
     
  11. pfournier

    pfournier Do it outside!

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    OM, if you are watching it dry like paint your doing something wrong. I'm constantly moving. Whether its reaching for my beer, changing flies, casting/retrieving line, resetting my fish finder, kicking my fins, rowing my ores, taking a leak..... always moving :) Oh, did I mention reaching for my beer? :)
     
  12. pfournier

    pfournier Do it outside!

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    rLight... one more thing, I hear those BC boys do well with micro leaches under indicators. I would guess that you could do the same thing with a type 3 sinking line and just slow retrieve.
     
  13. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    I've had good luck on red, pink, black and chromie soft hackles.
    Lots of times I'll fish them behind a bugger as a searching dropper pattern. You can do this with any nymph pattern.
    If I start hooking up regularly on the dropper, off comes the bugger and I'll just fish the dropper by itself.
     
  14. Sean Beauchamp

    Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

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    anything with rubber legs, coneheads, bunny fur, and steel eyes is a winner in my book.

    wait.... whats a nymph? ill ask the alpha trout next time i see him.
     
  15. rlight

    rlight Member

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    I appreciate all your help.
    What are your views on adding a sink tip leader to my floating line? I've looked at various types of sink tips (some are 7ft and 12ft long) at the local tackle shop made by Rio. If you have some thoughts on this, can you recommend types, brands and lengths.

    rlight
     
  16. Sean Beauchamp

    Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

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    if you dump a tip on your uncut WF floater it is going to cast like crap. especially considering you are most likely throwing a 4-6wt rod for your trout. try a poly leader instead or man up and pick up some spools and different lines.

    these questions come up A LOT and i think the general consensus is no.... you cant do everything with your floater. at some point an intermediate full sink and another type III or IV or even V full sink is what is desired for stillwaters. you will be hard pressed to find situations you cant handle with 3 lines to choose from.

    besides the fly on the end of your tippet, your line is what makes it happen. without the proper presentation you are goin home fishless. lines if taken care of will last several seasons (or longer!) so bite the bullet and get it done. you wont regret it.

    good luck my man!
     
  17. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    I agree with Sean.
    Having a floating, intermediate and full sink lines will provide you with the best chances for success. Those lines would pretty much cover every stillwater situation.
     
  18. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Active Member

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    Echo Sean. I wouldn't bother showing up in stillwater w/o a full sinker. 80%+ of my time on lakes/ponds is spent using a Type V density compensated full sink (falls in a straight line). I tend to use that at most depths, including shallow, and I don't even bother with a slow/intermediate line. One rod, one reel, two spools (1 float, 1 fast sink), that's it. And anymore, if I'm not pitching dry flies I'm probably not using a floater. I tell most guys to start w/ 2 lines, a floater & Type IV full sink. Then decide over time if you want another sinker, maybe a Type II. But it's like a 6 iron. You can leave it home and still play golf. Check out the SA Mastery series. Good luck!
     
  19. _WW_

    _WW_ Fishes with Wolves

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    There is a distinction between sink tips and sinking leaders. A sink tip is a piece of an actual flyline-complete in most cases with the braided core. A sinking leader is a piece of monofilament with a sinking coating applied.

    Usually a sink tip will alter the way a line that it is attached to casts. To restore the line to casting like it should the front taper and part of the belly are removed and replaced by the sink tip.

    With the sinking leaders you can usually attach these right to your line without making any alterations to it and your cast will be affected only slightly if at all.

    I have and still use the Rio sinking leaders. Other than a few lines I keep as strictly for dry fly use, I've looped the end of most of my lines. When I do this, I remove some of the taper to help the line turn over right to the loop. At the loop I can attach either a regular mono leader or one of the Rio sinking leaders.

    I usually go out with 3-5 rods depending on the season and the expected weather and will have them all rigged up differently. I like using the Rio sinking leaders for casting towards shore or when fish seem to be suspended shallow over deeper water. If you can only afford to buy one, get the longer one. You can always make it shorter if you feel the need.
     
  20. Krystoff

    Krystoff Member

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    In regards to having a single reel and multiple spools, how hard is it to change them out? Keep in mind I sit in a belly boat at this time cause I haven't found a v-style float tube or pontoon boat in my price range yet.