Nymph Fishing

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by rlight, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Changing spools while in a float tube is pretty easy but a pain if you do it multiple times during the day. Do it in shallow water so you can recover your rod or spool if you drop them.

    I've been using a Super Fat Cat for the past five years. I can take three rods set-up ready to fish (floater, intermediate and sinker). Very convenient and they aren't in the way.
     
  2. rlight

    rlight Member

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    Thanks to all of you, I appreciate your help.

    rlight
     
  3. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    Isn't trolling a dragon fly nymph or damsel fly nymph, nymph fishing in a lake? That can be very fast action way to fish. Fishing chironomids is also nymph fishing and fishing chironomids under an indicator can be very fast and exciting fishing at time. However the Old Man is correct fishing a nymph under an indicator can be boring at times.

    Keith
     
  4. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    I always change reels or spools right next to the shore. I've never lost anything yet but had a friend loose a rod and reel by trying that trick in the middle of a lake. Some big bucks went down to the bottom of the lake.

    Keith
     
  5. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    When fishing a lake, getting to the right depth is important. I sometimes use floating line if there is lots of surface action. I also use a sink tip, medium sink line, and fast sink line to make sure I get to where the trout are. Most smaller lakes in Washington can be fished with floating and sink tip line.

    Keith
     
  6. golfman65

    golfman65 Guest

    When your in a kickboat most have the aprons you put across in front of you, you shouldn't have any problem changing a spool unless you are handicapped...Here's a hint...your rod comes apart so you can run the line through again pretty easy...

    I also carry three spools, dry, clear intermediate and full sink...I use the dry and clear the most..hell I use the dry for almost everything as I'm normally chironie fishing. Instead of worrying about sink tips, tie some of your flies with bead heads and use a longer leader or add more tippet..
     
  7. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    Golfman:
    Us old people are clutzee. We go to the shallows to protect our investment.

    Keith
     
  8. Sean Beauchamp

    Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

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    i can change out a spool and string my rod in a hurricane in less than 3 minutes. its easy (and not dangerous) if youve done it a few times. as with everything in a float tube there is a learning curve. ie pissing, landing fish, drinking, eating, casting....

    (knock on wood)
     
  9. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    But when your as old as me you become senile. :beathead:

    Keith
     
  10. wolverine

    wolverine Member

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    Changing spools is easy. Reel the leader in so its close to the reel. Use a rubber band or a clothes pin to hold the leader against the rod so the leader stays put. Clip the leader off at the fly line, re-tie the leader to the new spool. Swap spools. Takes all off a minute to do. No re-stringing through the guides needed.
     
  11. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    That is the best approach I've heard yet. I normally break my rod down, restring and re-assemble. Having done it many times, its pretty quick and easy but leaving the leader strung though the guides is a great idea. Now why didn't I think of that :beathead:

    TC
     
  12. SmokinAces

    SmokinAces Keepin' It Reel

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    So are you tying a new albright knot from your leader to your fly line everytime? Only problem with that would be that your fly line would start to shrink after awhile. Great idea though, that thought never even crossed my mind.
     
  13. wolverine

    wolverine Member

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    I learned the technique from the brits across the pond. They often use cartridge reels and carry 4 different lines and in a days fishing, use them all. If there is a welded loop on the end of the fly line its easy to tie a Uni knot. You can also nail knot a 12" (or less) piece of 20 Lb Maxima to the flyline and put a small loop on the end of the mono. Then all you have to do is tie either a clinch or a uni knot to the loop.
     
  14. cutthroatking

    cutthroatking screw work lets fish

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    One of the best friggin' ideas I've heard in a long time!!!!

    john
     
  15. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Not sure why there is a desire to resist restringing through the guides. I generally put the leader that I want on each line while spooled so if I switch from a floater with a long leader I spool the whole thing up. When I switch to a sinking line with a shorter leader it is already on there. On my multi-tip/versi-tip line systems I also tie via nailknot each leader to each tip so they are fully ready out of the tip wallet. I'd rather spend a few seconds restringing than trying to retie my leader to line knots (besides loop to loop or nailknot to fly line would require the full thing to be removed from the guides anyway). That is my view from the cheap seats.
     
  16. Sean Beauchamp

    Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

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    exactly.

    not sure what makes it a hassle.....

    i try as hard as possible to eliminate tying nail knots and such on the water. tough thing to do with numb hands. my $.02
     
  17. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    What makes it a hassle is being in a float tube. In a boat or a pontoon, no problem.

    TC
     
  18. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Tim, good point, but here is one to consider for restringing in a float tube, I separate my rod into two pieces, string up one, then the other, stripping out plenty of line to keep hold of my leader/tippet and then reassemble. This works for me on both my pontoon and float tube even though I'm often using a 10' 4wt or 10' 5wt rod. I guess to each his/her own. I've also not yet had difficulty landing a fish in a tube or toon with my 10' rods, but some say it will eventually happen. I look forward to that HOG hauling event!
     
  19. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Gary,
    Good idea. The only downside I see is you are still likely to have to do some work on your leader after the spool change. This of course would be based on what line you just changed to.
    As an example, say you have a floater with a 12' leader, intermediate with a 7.5' leader and a full sink with a 4' leader. If you changed from the floater to the full sink, your full sink would end up with a 12' leader. Flip flop that going from the full sink to the floater, you'd end up 4' leader on your floater.

    I've gotten really lazy when it comes to this stuff. ;) I guess that is why I carry three rods strung up to ready to fish. If a hatch comes off and fish are taking dries like crazy, I like to be ready to fish to them immediately without changing spools or leaders.
     
  20. Sean Beauchamp

    Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

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    agree to disagree i guess.

    i spend 60+ days a year in my float tube and i change spools and retring rods without breaking them down everytime. i string as far as i can reach ( past the halfway) and pull through a pile of slack (in case i were to drop my rod i have something to grab) and then the lower half goes in the drink where i hold the reel between my ankles and retring the rest. pull the slack through and reach down and grab my rod between the first guide and reel, pull it up shake it off tie on my fly and im ready to fish.

    i dont even think about it.

    the one time i dropped a rod was while unhooking and photographing a brown on pass lake. somehow in the excitement i nudged my rod off the side of my tube. never will that happen again. i now have a new spot for my rod while taking care of fish.

    everything about float tubes is trial and error i guess. everyone works out there own systems. the one thing that is always a bit complicated is taking a piss in a float tube.

    still wondering why no one sells a bladder system. sometimes i even consider a catheter :eek:
     

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