Oar Rites report

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Kent Lufkin, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    I bought a pair of Oar Rites last spring, installed them on my 7' Carlisles and then didn't use my pontoon boat until last Saturday when a couple friends and I floated the Skagit from Marblemount to Rockport (2 dollies, 1 brief LDR, and 1 strike between us). I was pleasantly surprised by how well they kept the oar blades properly aligned and prevented unintended 'feathering'. At about $50 for the pair, they turned out to have been money well spent as it's one less thing to think about while rowing, especially in the sections that require a bit more operator attention.

    K
  2. Jim Jones flytosser

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    Woodinville, WA
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    After reading the other oar thread, are you using floating blades? I too have been thinking about getting some oar rites, but now may end up going to glass oars and oar rites. I need to rob a convenience store or something. :rolleyes:
  3. Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Hey Jim,

    My Carlisles are just the cheapo oars that came with my pontoon boat, they float but they're nothing fancy. I tend to rotate my wrists periodically when I row so the boat will occasionally take an unexpected turn one way or the other when I've managed to feather the blade by mistake. The Oar Rites took me about 30 seconds to instantly fall in love with.

    But if you've got a better boat than mine or some extra tax-return money, you might also look at the pin-and-clip-style oars and oarlocks the whitewater guys use. They're pretty bulletproof and you won't need an Oar Rite with them. Here's a link that shows the difference: http://www.nrsweb.com/Frames/OarAccessories.asp

    K
  4. Jerry Daschofsky Moderator

    Posts: 7,761
    Graham, WA, USA.
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    Here's something you can do, and get a "double" effect. Some people don't like oarrights because it's harder to "feather" the oar. Which some people like to do. But oarrights are well needed if you do alot of "technical" rowing where oar placement is a necessity. But all you need is just a little bit of the oar rites. So if you look underneath (where it attaches to the oar) you'll see little braces of plastic. What you can do is cut back the plastic to near the back. So you have just enough of the oarright so that it fits into the oarlock and keeps it aligned. But with a slight pullback, you will be able to feather the oar. If you're running something technical, chances are if your oar comes up, it'll come up past the oarright anyways. The moment you push it back down, it'll go into position again. So you can have the best of both worlds.
  5. pwoens Active Member

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    Spokane, Washington, USA.
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    Wow...the first piece of advice from Jerry that I can use.... :rofl: :clown: :clown: :clown: :p :p :p :p Just kidding, about the first piece of advice....LOL

    That is such an awesome idea!!! The best of both worlds no doubt. I could see it causing a problem once in a great remote while but how cool of an idea. Thanks Jerry!!! :thumb: :thumb:
  6. Jerry Daschofsky Moderator

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    Yeah, I've been known to give some good advice occasionally. :rofl:
  7. ibn Moderator

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    I don't mind oar rites, they seem to come in handy, but they will often bug me. A friend of mine bought a year old hyde boat and his oars had something even cooler. The handes of the oars had 2 small nipples on the end of the oar, they lined up with the blades, so basically you would grip the oars and your thumb would rest on the end of the oars between these 2 nipples.

    I found myself able to feather the oars, but at the same time always know the allignment of the oar blades so I could react fast. It seemed very natural to grip the oars in this manner to. Whoever came up with this is a genius in my book!

    -I
  8. ray helaers New Member

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    Oar rites are a nice little gadget, but it is certainly possible to row correctly without them, either with another gadget like the one described by ibn, or by just paying closer attention. I've been rowing my boat for 10 years without them, which is not to say that I couldn't have used them a time or two, and when I have had a chance to row with them, I could certainly see the benefit. But where they could be considered indespensible is in fishing from an achored boat. The oar rites keep the blades vertical, so that they act like rudders, and keep the boat from swinging in the current on the achor line; without them, you're pretty close to screwed in this regard.

    Having said that, I too really like Jerry's idea.
  9. Jerry Daschofsky Moderator

    Posts: 7,761
    Graham, WA, USA.
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    I do believe that oarrites were originally designed for the whitewater community. When you're rowing, that blade has to be in position. There's not errors when it comes to that. Sometimes even conditioning won't help. Especially when you're running say a class 4/5. You won't have time to look to see if you have the oar in position, you're too busy watching straight ahead. Pin/clips have been the answer, but some people like to bring their oars in. With pin/clips, they are locked in position. So assume some whitewater guys designed it so they could bring oars in yet still have that "positive lock" of the oars. I know I saw them in whitewatering well before I saw them on fishing boats.

    Actually, on my driftboats I usually won't use oarrights. Only time I even put them on (I swap out between standard clamp down rings and oarrites depending on river I'm on) is if I know I'm doing some technical rivers (like the upper Duc or the Calawah). Most part, don't need them in fishing EXCEPT as Ray said on anchor. They are wonderful.