Pass Lake Report 1/29/06

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Wayne Jordan, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. Time- 9 AM- 1 PM

    Weather- Windy & Rain after 11:30, and more wind (typical Pass Lake conditions for January)

    Fish- 6 Rainbows

    Flies- 1 caught on a nymph, the rest on streamers

    Anglers- My friend James and I had the lake to ourselves.

    Interesting sight- A family of 5 otters were playing along the shoreline when we first got on the lake.
     
  2. Now that's how to post a report!
     
  3. Which part of the lake did you catch your rainbows? My fishing buddy and I fished the lake last week without any luck but it was sunny and the water wasn't as murky as normal. Maybe the weather being wet and windy had something to do with your success. Did you catch your fish all at one time or spaced out during the day?
     
  4. The fish weren't concentrated in one area. When the fishing is slow like it was yesterday I'll troll with a full sinking line with a fly that will get their attention. Try to cover the water and don't concentrate on one small area, or depth.
    Spring will be here soon enough, the bugs will be coming off, and the fish will be more active.
     
  5. It's nice to know that the otters are still there. Over the years, I've seen them and their ancestors on a number of occasions, along with the deer, bald eagles, ospreys, and assorted waterfowl. There always seems to be a great blue heron, perched on on a low cedar limb, critiqueing my casting technique. Once, when I was rowing my pram along the west shoreline, I heard dogs barking in the distance. In a couple of minutes a handsome four-point blacktail, blowing hard, crashed through the shoreline brush and splashed into the water. He swam within thirty feet of my pram and continued uplake for about 300 yards before wading ashore and disappearing into the vine maple. A minute or two later two panting dogs, with tongues hanging out, arrived at the same spot where the deer entered the water. One, a black lab, even jumped in and swam around in circles a few times before giving up on the deer chase. Are those big old bucks smart or what?
    Pass Lake is a special place. Catching a few nice trout there is the icing on the cake. Kudos to the watch-dog fly fishing club and others who help protect her.
     
  6. It's nice to know that the otters are still there. Over the years, I've seen them and their ancestors on a number of occasions, along with the deer, bald eagles, ospreys, and assorted waterfowl. There always seems to be a great blue heron, perched on a low cedar limb, critiqueing my casting technique. Once, when I was rowing my pram along the west shoreline, I heard dogs barking in the distance. In a couple of minutes a handsome four-point blacktail, blowing hard, crashed through the shoreline brush and splashed into the water. He swam within thirty feet of my pram and continued uplake for about 300 yards before wading ashore and disappearing into the vine maple. A minute or two later two panting dogs, with tongues hanging out, arrived at the same spot where the deer entered the water. One, a black lab, even jumped in and swam around in circles a few times before giving up on the deer chase. Are those big old bucks smart or what?
    Pass Lake is a special place. Catching a few nice trout there is the icing on the cake. Kudos to the watch-dog fly fishing club and others who help protect her.
     
  7. Dang it, I enjoy watching the otters a lot! I've even stopped fishing for more than an hour just to try to get close enough to one to take a good picture. (I have a couple good ones from different settings.) It is nevertheless discouraging to remember that they "eat", more like just belly bite, so many fish. Oh well, that's the way of things. Congratulations on a good day and thanks for the report.
     
  8. The otters are probably part of the reason the fish in that lake are so big!
     

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