Peaon

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by pittendrigh, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. pittendrigh

    pittendrigh Active Member

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    This fly has been a consistent producer on the lakes recently. The trout move out to deep water in the middle of the lake in summer--on places like Montana's Canyon Ferry reservoir. But in spring and fall they move in close to shore where you can reach them with a fly rod. On days when it's too windy to float the river you can usually find a place--somewhere on the big lake--where the wind will be at your back, with a nice sandstone cliff behind. A good chop on the water is essential. If you use a fly rod bobber five to ten feet above the streamer the waves jig the fly for you. The fish seem to average 17 to 20 inches long. And oh so fat and healthy. River fish never get so heavy.

    Chartreuse is a hot color. Not sure why. But it is.

    Pea Sucking Leech didn't ring right. So I call this one the Peaon. It sure has been a good fly for me.
    [​IMG]
     
    Mark Mercer likes this.
  2. Mark Mercer

    Mark Mercer Member

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    I can see why this could be a killer fly, could you give us a receipt and how it's constructed? I think it could be a deadly salt water fly as well, nice tie!
    thanks,

    Mark
     
  3. pittendrigh

    pittendrigh Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    Making this fly is involved and a bit time consuming. I wont' be for everyone. I try to concentrate on fast and easy flies. Most of the time. So I do have time for a few oddball patterns like this one. This is one of my best all time flies. For me it's worth it. But maybe not so for others.

    http://www.montana-riverboats.com/?page=Fly-Tying/Sandy-Pittendrigh/Lathe/The-Lathe.jpg
     
  4. McNasty

    McNasty Canyon Lurker

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    man thats a wicked leech! good job.
     
  5. riseform

    riseform Active Member

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    Sandy, how are you constructing that head? The old system was a loop of mono for the head.

    I still marvel at this idea and technique, well done.
     
  6. Mark Mercer

    Mark Mercer Member

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    You're right, pretty time consuming pattern... I wouldn't want to tie dozens of them but it would be worth tying up a
    few for myself. Thanks for giving us the construction info.
     
  7. pittendrigh

    pittendrigh Active Member

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    I retired six months back. A year in January actually. I'm in less of a hurry to do everything now. And I realize I tie flies because I like the process. I end up giving away a good third of the flies I tie anyway. So a few time consuming patterns aren't a problem--turn on the football. Turn off the sound. Turn on the Coltrane. Fire up the vise. Time doesn't matter in that context.

    However--while the fly pictured above may well be time consuming and complex, the "two vise rotary lathe" technique in general is useful. That's an understatement. I've got some simpler snelled hook patterns that are fast and easy to tie on the lathe. Effective too.

    Most articulated leech and streamer patterns are tied with two hooks, one up front and then a trailing stinger hook behind. But that's a troublesome technique. The rear end of the fly so often tangles with the front hook many tiers clip the front hook off, and thereby use the front hook as a shank only--as sort of a tying convenience.

    With the two vise wire lathe you can substitute a barrel swivel for the (clipped) front hook. It's fast and easy and you get even more end-to-end flexibility. Photos are in the works......